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Undated Sarah Orne Jewett Letters

Jewett sent many letters that lack dates.  Some may be dated from internal evidence, but many cannot be assigned even approximate dates, given our current state of knowledge.  However, as this archive of transcriptions grows, new information may help to date more of these letters and, then, to place them in or close to their proper sequence.  The site manager always welcomes ideas and information.



SOJ to an unknown recipient, possibly Mary Rice Jewett
 

Monday night

[ After 1871 ]

 

…….…I didnt know which room she wanted them for.  This day has been devoted to friendship.  I went to find Susy Ward in Fullton St., but she was in Washington and I had a few pleasant minutes with Dr. Ward,* and then had to come back to lunch for I was kept so late by my story man before I could start.

 
Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Susy Ward ... Dr. Ward:  Susan and William Hayes Ward. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.
 

SOJ probably to Mary Rice Jewett and Caroline Jewett Eastman*

Thursday afternoon
[Before 1878 or between 1892 and April 1897 ]

Dear Girls

            ……….It wasn't you being busy that was unnoticed, but you said that it was a beautiful morning and we would go somewhere if I were home, and I thought it was proper for you to go anyway, and I afterward found that you did, so I laughed.  But I always think the fuller we can make our lives when we are apart the more we have to give when we are together -- which has a didactic tone, but you will please excuse.  I think sometimes people who are a great deal together get to be each one-legged when they are apart -- and it is not useful to be one-legged.

 
Notes

Eastman:  Jewett often writes to both of her sisters, sometimes addressing them as "girls."  That no other family members are mentioned suggests that the letter comes from before Caroline's marriage in 1878, but it may come from between the deaths of her husband, Edward, in March 1892 and of Caroline in April 1897.
    The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

[Winter 1881-1891]*

Thursday morning

My dear darling
      I didn't read a word in the cars and I must say that the way seemed long! It was a lovely brown and gold winter afternoon with a cold clear yellow sunset and a great wind that really rocked the car to and fro when the trained stopped at those little stations on the marshes, but the air was fresh and sweet and not too cold. I thought and thought of you my darling and I had such a pain in my heart when I thought that I had been cross only it wasn't with you. I felt so baffled and helpless and as if I were doing wrong just when I had meant to do right. [AF parentheses begins] I don't mean that I am going to talk all about things in this letter [end parentheses] -- for you know how it is with me better than I do myself -- and know all that I could say, except that I must tell you over again how dearly I love you and always have you in my heart as I could never have anybody else. It is as much a love born into me and grown into me as for Mary and Carrie and Stubby, and what you are to me and have been in my life I can never write or say. So when I have to say no to any wish of yours or have to come away when you wish I would stay it hurts me terribly. Do remember always how I think and think to [of?] you if I am away ----
     [AF parentheses begins] I found Mary very cheerful thank Heaven, and enjoying her visit from Stubby who still remains -- his father having taken the little room while Carrie is ill. She is looking weak, but getting on pretty well I should think and the grippe is taking its course so that she ought to be better now in a day or two. Mary has been busy between the two houses & [unreadable] has been good.
     I am going to the bank and so I must end my letter. Good bye dear darling Fuff -- from

your Pinny [end parentheses]

Earlier transcriber notes.

A Letter from Sarah Orne Jewett to Annie Fields
(nd - but written while Ned Eastman was still alive. AF has marked a couple of passages with parentheses in pencil)


New notes

Winter.  Theodore Eastman (Stubby) was born on 4 August 1879.  His father, Edwin Eastman, died 18 March 1892.  Jewett's intimate letters to Fields begin in 1881.

The manuscript of this letter is at the University of New England,  Maine Women Writers Collection,  Jewett Collection  correspondence corr058-soj-af-07New transcription by Terry & Linda Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields [1881 or later]

"The country is beautiful to look at, but it is such clear cold weather that you feel as if you were under a great block of clear, shining ice, instead of air and sky. There is a grey cloud-bank hanging over the sea all along the eastern horizon and I think it is going to snow again, or rain. The wood-sleds are creeping out of the woods and into the village, and the oxen are like rocks from the pastures, or the tops of ledges, they look so hard and tough and frosted over.

     You are like my monkey and the jack-in-the-box with your meetings. Some day you will get up a big one that will scare you to death."

Note

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Saturday morning
[ After 1881 ]

Dear Mary

                  ………….…What an empty calico bag Vallie* is!  She is devoured by self love and self pity poor thing  --  if anybody wants to see where those things lead a person there she stands -- miserable herself and making everybody miserable and bored.  Only a little while ago, I wrote of Discontent* and a note, that was all no good.  Well, we can see what turns up but cant give her either Mr. Howell's letter or Mr. Aldriches* the latter only signs his name to the letters I want to keep  --  the rest are but notes with an initial.  She wears me all out only to think of her.  Oh my “sister now blows a great whoo like Fappy Rice”.  I wonder if people stopped doing she would turn round and try to please them.# My heart breaks for Mary Harriet a wintering of her, I don't think it was worth a while.

                       #Now she only tries to make you pleasedwithher -- Whoo!

  Notes

after 1881  This letter must have been composed after Jewett become friends with Thomas Bailey Aldrich and would have substantial correspondence from him, which makes 1881 about the earliest likely composition date.  The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Vallie:  The identity of this person is not yet known. Assistance is welcome.

Discontent:  Jewett may speak of her poem, "Discontent,"which appeared in St. Nicholas (3:247), February 1876. 

Mr. Howell's letter or Mr. Aldriches:  William Dean Howells and Thomas Bailey Aldrich.  See Correspondents.

Fappy Rice:  Presumably this is a nickname for a Rice family relative, but this person has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Mary Harriet:  The identity of this person is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ probably to Mary Rice Jewett

[ Saturday a.m. between 1880 and 1903]

I left my letter open thinking that I would send a few lines this morning but I am catching a fair wind & tide to go to H. & Mifflins so I shant stop to write.

 
Notes

between 1880 and 1903:  The composition date of this letter seems bounded between the formation of Houghton, Mifflin and Company in 1880 and Jewett carriage accident in September 1902.
    Handwritten notes with this transcription read: [Saturday  a. m.]

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Bucklin Davenport Claflin

[ Begin letterhead ]

148. Charles Street.
    Boston.

[ End letterhead ]

10 March*
[ After 1881 ]
Dear Mrs. Claflin

    Thank you for remembering me, but I am going away for a few days for a change, and I am afraid at any rate should not be quite equal to the day at Wellesley --

Yours affectionately
Sarah O. Jewett

Notes

10 March:  Sent from the home of Annie Fields, this letter almost certainly was composed after the death of James T. Fields in April of 1881.

The manuscript of this letter is provided by Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center from the Governor William and Mary Claflin Papers,  GA-9, Box 4, Miscellaneous Folder J. On the back side of the ms is this note: January 1960 -- from original in Colby College Library, Waterville, Maine.  Gift of the Librarian.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Sarah Wyman Whitman

3 October [ After 1881 ]
South Berwick
Maine.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The truth has been that all summer I could not put myself down to steady work but autumn weather is always kind, and certain things have blown away that troubled the summer air . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S. O. J.


Notes

After 1881:  The earliest letter so far known between Jewet and Whitman is dated April 3, 1882.  Jewett seems to have become close friends with Whitman at about the same time she became friends with Annie Adams Fields.
    A handwritten note on this transcription reads: To: S W.  The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Wednesday evening. [1881 - 1890.]

   

     Sometimes, the business part of writing grows very noxious to me, and I wonder if in heaven our best thoughts -- poet's thoughts, especially -- will not be flowers, somehow, or some sort of beautiful live things that stand about and grow, and don't have to be chaffed over and bought and sold. It seems as bad as selling our fellow beings, but being in this world everything must have a body, and a material part, so covers and leaves and publishing generally come under that head, and is another thing to make us wish to fly away and be at rest!

     [One day these verses came with the usual bulletin of prose.]

Right here, where noisiest, narrowest is the street;
Where gaudy shops bedeck the crowded way;
Where idle newsboys in vindictive play
Dart to and fro with venturesome bare feet;
Here, where the bulletins from fort and fleet
Tell gaping readers what's amiss today,
Where sin bedizens, folly makes too gay,
And all are victims of their own conceit;
With these ephemeral insects of an hour
That war and flutter, as they downward float
In some pale sunbeam that the spring has brought,
Where this vain world is revelling in power;
I met great Emerson, serene, remote,*
Like one adventuring on seas of thought.

Notes

After 1880, perhaps around 1890:  Jewett read and referred to Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) throughout her career, but she seems to have shown particular interest in reading him late in the 1880s.  After Carlyle's death, James Anthony Froude published a several biographical volumes on Carlyle through the 1880s.  Jewett read these and, presumably, they stimulated her interest in him.

great Emerson: Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882).  Jewett included this poem in her unpublished story, "Carlyle in America."

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     May. [After 1881 and before 1891, the date of Jewett's mother's death]

 

     This is something I remember at this moment in Voltaire. "He labored at every new work as if he had his reputation still to make!" But oh, his letters! such grace, such "gaieté de cœur"! They are really wonderful, are they not? I only wish that there were more of them, and when I saw an edition of his works for sale in Libbie's catalogue,* I was tempted to bid. I don't dare propose to Mother the bringing in of seventy volumes at one fell swoop! or it might be ninety-seven in the best edition.
 

     Good morning, dear. I begin to set my day and to wonder if I can't spend a week from this coming Sunday with you....

     I hope you can get off to Manchester by the fourth or fifth, as you planned, for I can only get a few days there at first, for I find that the County Conference,* dear to my heart, is coming on the eleventh, all the country ministers and their wives and delightful delegates who never appear to go anywhere else -- nice old country women.

Notes

in Voltaire. "He labored at every new work as if he had his reputation still to make!": Voltaire, (François-Marie Arouet, 1694-1778), according to the Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia, "was the most influential figure of the French Enlightenment." He is best known, perhaps, for his novella, Candide (1766). Information on the location of the quotation would be welcome.

Libbie's catalogue: Charles F. Libbie & Co., auctioneers of Boston, regularly published catalogs of book collections to be sold at auction. For example: Catalogue of a portion of the libraries of the late Rev. Convers Francis, and his sister, Lydia M. Child, of Cambridge, being a very interesting collection of standard, rare and curious books ... To be sold by auction ... May 12, 13 and 14, in the Library salesroom, no. 608 Washington St. ... (1887).

County Conference: a meeting of representatives from local churches. See above note for Manchester.
 
This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




Olga von Radecki to Annie Adams Fields

[ After 1882 ]*

My dear Mrs. Fields,

    Fearing to be unsuccessful in my attempt to see you, I write to tell you how very very sorry I was, another engagement interfered with my spending the evening with you in the quiet neighborly fashion which I should have enjoyed extremely.

    Please accept the little remembrance I brought for you from home,* and believe me

    Yours devotedly

Olga von Radecki

96 Charles Street, Monday.*


Notes

After 1882:  Von Radecki moved from Latvia to Boston in 1882 and began performing locally late that year.
 
from home
:  Olga von Radecki was born in Riga, Latvia, and it may be that she has given Fields an item from Latvia.

96 Charles Street:  Note that this address makes von Radecki literally a near neighbor to Fields at the time she wrote this letter.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, MS1743, Series: III. Letters to Annie (Adams) Fields: Letters to Annie Fields from various correspondents.(320). Radecki, Olga von, fl. 1882. 1 letter; [n.d.].



SOJ to John Greenleaf Whittier

  Friday --
[ August, between 1882 and 1889 ]


My dear Friend

            Your package came today and I must thank you first for your dear note and then for something so touching and peculiarly interesting that I cant be grateful enough.  Poor Miss Sally.* I never shall forget her: -- few persons or things have ever made so deep an impression in me though I only saw her once in her late years.  I have not had time to more than glance at these memorials, but is not t[h]e letter that came with them a charming one?  You are so kind to me.  It makes the relationship we sometimes have talked of half laughingly a very real one, and draws me very close to you all the time.  I really belong to you more lovingly every year, and it makes me truly feel like “the little girl” to be so tenderly thought of, and remembered in so many lovely ways.  This has come so close to my birthday* that I like to connect the worn letters and your thought and the day all together.

            We talk every day about the First day afternoon and how much we rejoiced being with you.  Mrs. Lodge* has been here for a day or two, so sweet and bright and kind and there has been a great gossiping about the Associated Charities* not to speak of lesser subjects.  I must say good bye, but we both send love to you.

                                                                                    Yours affectionately

                                                                                                Sarah

 

Note

between 1882 and 1889:  This letter must have been composed between 1882, when Jewett began regular stays with Annie Adams Fields in Boston and the death of Mary Greenwood Lodge in 1889.  A handwritten note on this transcription reads: Whittier.

Poor Miss Sally:  Miss Sally has not been identified.  She seems clearly to be close to Whittier and at least an acquaintance of Jewett, who died between 1882 and 1889.

my birthday: Jewett's birthday is 3 September.

Mrs. Lodge: Probably Mary Greenwood Lodge (1829 - 1889).  See Correspondents.

Associated Charities: Annie Adams Fields was a patron of and volunteer for the Associated Charities of Boston.  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields
 Tuesday morning
[ Between 1882 and 1897 ]*

Dear Fuff!*

    The long wished for showers are hindering me from going to York and I hear that the Howells* are at Wells, or were last Sunday.  I wish that they would fall in love with the old place and its green marshes and win other people there.  If I feel just like it I mean to drive round there from York forst [forest?] to the Cliff* to see the friends of last year and then to Wells to spend the night.  I shouldn't dare to tell Mother but I should like to [remain?] and have a day by myself.  I feel like your Berkshire old woman who said My God!  More creatures!  And yet I am having a dear quiet time at home.  And now that Carrie* is better I am so thankful and hopeful that everything seems right.  It is so pleasant here in the old house, the old houses I ought to say.  And yet I like to play out doors all alone sometimes just as I used when I was a little girl.  Fuff not to be scared about Pinny going round the shore alone.  Every fisherman knows her and she will be protected!    And I daresay she wont go!. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(Pinny)

 
Notes

Between 1882 and 1897:  The composition date of this letter is bounded by the appearance of "Fuff" as a nickname for Fields and the death of Carrie Jewett Eastman.  See notes below.
    The ellipsss in the transcription indicates that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Howells: William Dean Howells.  See Correspondents.

the Cliff: York Harbor, ME is known in part for "The Cliff Walk ...an ancient shoreline path lined with beach roses, [that] winds along Eastern Point ledges above the surf."  The surrounding area has long included summer residences.

Carrie: Caroline Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.

Pinny:  Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Friday morning
[ May 1, after 1882 ]


Dearest Fuff*

            I have been on a trading binge to hold the horse for John* while he got a bunch of shingles to mend the well house roof.  And we also went down to the boat house to see what must be done about painting etc.  I begin to feel in a hurry about going down river!  I particularly wish to take some photographs before the leaves are fully out.

            Here is the first of May, and no Pinny* going a Maying for press of other business, only she may "fetch a compass" round by the woods later in the day.  --  I wonder what you are going to do.  Is it Board meeting*  (As usual?) 

            There is such a bustle out of doors now all the farmers are out and they come hurrying into the village for seeds and shovels and all sorts of things. After this time they have to be just as hard at work as possible until after haying . . . . . . . . . . . . .

                                                . . . . . . . . . . . . .  --  With much love  from  P. L.

 

 Notes

After 1882: The letter must have been composed after Jewett began using the Pinny Lawson nickname for herself in the summer of 1882. 
    The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

John:  John Tucker. See Correspondents.

Pinny: Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Board meeting: This would likely relate to the Associated Charities of Boston.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields 

 

Wednesday morning
[ After 1882 ]

Dearest Fuff.*

            Didn't we have . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

            Dear Fuffy I feel sure that being so ill makes everything harder to bear and now you are better life will be a good deal easier, though never easy for us who are in the middle of its waves.  The best we can say to one another is Courage and Patience!  but first of all Love and Hope!  and that we do have in both our hearts, and if it were only to be in the world for the sake of the joy it is to have one another I should think it worth while!   to have you and to love you is so dear to me.  And indeed a life very full of satisfaction for both of us & we must forget the hard things in the bright ones . . . . . . . . . .

Your own Pinny*

 

 Notes

The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Pinny: Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.    See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Thursday afternoon
[ After 1882 ]


Dearest Fuff*

            I thought you were in Boston yesterday!  I am afraid you were very hot, for it was high above ninety here and only excelled in discomfort by the celebrated Saturday.  But this morning there was a delicious north wind with a touch of east in it and I have been in the garden picking currants all the morning long and I had a beautiful time.  Few persons know that it is very pretty to sit on the ground under a tall currant bush and see the colour of it against the blue sky.  No Pinny* not to get cold; she mostly was throned on a little box!  Mary has gone down to York in solemn state to see Hattie Denny* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Your own  S. O. J.

 

 

 Notes

The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Pinny: Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.    See Correspondents.

Hattie Denny: Probably Mary Harriet Denny.  See Augusta Maria Denny Tyler in Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Monday

[ Summer, After 1882 ]

. . . . . . . . . . I have been weeding the garden with great industry since tea  --  and the portulacca bed is clean as a whistle  -  much transplanting is also done this day by me and sister!  or I should have properly & honestly said sister and me.  Dear Fuff how I think of you and love you. . . . . . . . . . . . .

                                                 (Pinny)

Notes

After 1882: The letter must have been composed after Jewett began using the Pinny Lawson nickname for herself in the summer of 1882. 
    The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Pinny: Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.    See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[ After 1882 ]


Dear Mary

Thursday.  ---------- Give ever so much love to both Aunts* also best respects… Mrs. Fields* sends affectionate remembrance.  Oh, here was slaying of Hittites and Jebusites* last night.  You know she had curiosities respecting buffalo bugs?*  Well, a beast was found in her basket that has the crewels in it in a funny little pink & white box, and we had to go out in the Avenue to slay it properly, scratching it into the dirt.  You ought to have been here.  I never saw but one or two before myself.  Goodbye from Sarah.

 
Notes

The hyphens at the beginning  indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

both Aunts: The Jewetts had many aunts with whom they exchanged visits and letters.  Which aunts are meant in this case is not yet known.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

slaying of Hittites and Jebusites: Hittites and Jebusites are named in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible as among the Canaanite nations who were occupants of the "promised land" that was the destination of the Hebrews after their escape from slavery in Egypt.

buffalo bugs:  Probably black carpet beetles, the larvae of which feed on natural fibers in carpets and clothing.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


Monday afternoon
[ After 1882 ]


Dear T. L.*

            You know that I told you about the poor woman who disappeared in the night?  Today somebody came racing to the village with the news that there was a drowned person in the river,* and so this is the end of the miserable story.  Instead of going to the river at the landing she went across the fields and pastures to a lonely spot far from any houses and there tied a great stone into her apron and fastened it to her foot and another to her [so transcribed] and to her neck with bits of her clothes  --  all this at midnight and in the white moonlight of that week.  She said in the piteous letter that she left that she should need no burial  --  and so down she went into the water to be done with her life and its troubles.  It seems to me a most tragic thing, and as if people here didn't half take in the full misery of it.  After the fisherman saw her she was taken out and brought to the village an awful muffled thing in a wagon and the people stood in little knots together and watched it go by.  Then imagine a little later that the daughter is brought by the coroner and that she goes in to the little building where the town's prisoners are put and where the body lies, while a little black crowd wait silently outside, and she acknowledges that it is her mother and is told that she may go away and out she comes alone trying to be bold and not to show that she is shocked, but with a dismal white color to her and a consciousness of guilt surrounding her like a cloak of lead so that she walks heavily and hindered.  I saw her as she went up the street, and afterward some body told me that she showed no feeling but I have wished and wished that I had gone over to her.  It was a low dull face, yet not without some prettiness.  Where is there a preacher who can make such people hear!  Why, it was somehow like having seen The Scarlet Letter* in real life, it was exactly as solemn and weird a thing as that would be.  The whole story is most sad.  The poor soul who drowned herself had been wild and astray in her youth  --  it seems as if she had gone crazy with the daughter's sin to double her own guilt.  It is all most pathetic to hear of the little legacies that she left to her friends and of her saying in the letter that she gave some poor trifles to an acquaintance "in gratitude for her kindness"  --  I think the wretched fellow who has been with the girl is to be blamed as much as any one.

 

 Notes

T.L.: A nickname for Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

drowned person in the river:  No further information about this event has yet been found.  Assistance is welcome.

The Scarlet Letter:  American Nathaniel Hawthorne's (1804-1864) novel, The Scarlet Letter (1850), examines the consequences of a woman bearing a child in an adulterous relationship.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett (2002), refers to this letter, indicating that the manuscript is in the collection of Harvard's Houghton Library. Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields
  

           

Friday morning

[ After 1882 ]*

Dear Mouse*

         . . . . . . . . . . I hope to finish the sketch today.  Things are always longer than ropes when you have to copy them but this is really only fifty five or six pages just about right I think for what it is.  I long to read it to you.  I don't know when I have laughed so over anything that belonged to me!  I hope your picture sale has been prosperous but I am afraid it cant draw as it did last year.  People would buy one who would care about two! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Notes

After 1882:  The earliest boundary for this letter would have to be after Jewett and Fields return from their first European trip late in 1882.  While it cannot be known which of Jewett's stories would make her laugh, some strong candidates are: "The Dulham Ladies" (1886), "The Courting of Sister Wisby" (1887), "Law Lane" (1887), "The Guests of Mrs. Timms" (1894), and "Bold Words at the Bridge" (1899)

Mouse: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Saturday afternoon

[ Winter between 1882 and 1890 ]

I came so near seeing you today darling that I miss you all the more because I gave it up.  This morning I said to myself why shouldn't I go to you and spend Sunday and come down on Monday with Cora*, and it was the loveliest thing in the world to think about, so pretty soon I tumbled out of bed and felt very eager and happy and I was to take the two o'clock train and reach Charles St. before you came in yourself and then I didn't exactly know where I would be when you hurried up the stairs to get ready for dinner.  Oh darling I cant bear to give up this lovely long evening I might have had with you!  But you must see that when I came down stairs I found that Mother looked even more pale and tired than when we came home last night and she told me that she was not feeling quite well by everything she did much plainer than if she had talked a great deal about it.  And a little later John* who rarely takes a holiday said that he hoped to go to Portsmouth if it is good weather tomorrow and might he have one of the horses?  So I thought that Mother might not like to stay alone tonight, and I didn't wish to break up John's plans and I shall like to keep my eye on the furnace if he is gone!  and so  --  I couldn't see my little books, and there is a little crack in my heart that never will be mended until I do see you dear.  Mother brightened up amazingly when it was too late to go!  and I suppose I really might have been away as well as not but it did not look like it and I did what was right then.  I feel as if I were tying myself to the rigging this time!  --  for you did want me to come today, didn't you darling?  It was dismal to have Mother propose that I should go over to Exeter and spend Sunday!  I couldn't

                                                                        (rest missing)

 

 

 Notes


Winter between 1882 and 1890:  The composition date is bounded by the the establishment of intimate friendship between Jewett and Fields and the death of Jewett's mother in October 1891.  For Caroline Perry Jewett, see Correspondents.

Cora: Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

John: John Tucker. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Edward Henry Rollins 


South Berwick, Maine February  23 
[ Before 1889 ]

My dear Mr. Rollins

    I shall certainly do whatever I can in regard to the matter of the Hale property,* both for the sake of those good ladies our friends, and because I agree with you that such a beautiful old estate ought not to fall into unappreciative or unworthy hands, for their sakes or its own.  I am sending your letter to some friends who have had the matter in mind and who already know about the place, since they may be able to do more than I can just now.

    We must both wish that the land between the house and the river had not been sold, but that cannot be helped now.  Neither can we bring back the old warehouse!  The exquisite old garden can be brought back, however, and I hope that we can find the right persons to do it.

    Believe me,                   

Yours very truly,
 S.  O.  Jewett


Notes

Before 1889:  The letter must have been composed before the death of Senator Rollins.  Notes on this transcription read: ROLLINS ESTATE  [letter owned at "Three Rivers Farms" by the heirs of Edward Henry Rollins, U. S. Senator  (b.  Rollinsford,  1824;  d.  Isles of Shoals,  1889)].

Hale property:  It seems possible that Jewett refers to the property of the Portsmouth Manufacturing Company in South Berwick, formerly owned by Samuel Hale and his son Francis.  This includes what is now the Counting House Museum of the Old Berwick Historical Society. See also "The Landing Mill and its Time" by Annie Wentworth Baer.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields 

Monday morning

[ Late Winter after 1883 ]

Dear darling  Your letter has done me good, and I wish you would scold at me a great deal more than you ever do.  I dont believe it was anything but tiredness that made me miserable when I read the Atlantic notice.*  An awful feeling of despair rushed over me at the thought of doing any more writing at all.  This has been one of the times when I really have lost all my interest in my stories  --  and it was not so much that my pride was hurt as that I felt entirely incapable of doing anything more at all.  When I think about it now, seriously, I am sure that I have done the best I could at this work of mine, and so I have nothing to fear.  I shall be better by and by, and the stories will begin to write themselves down again but the truth is that most of the time now I am really ill.  It frets me even to think about copying and all the rest of it!  and at the same time I am worrying because I cant get any work done when for many reasons it would be best.  I begin to dread next winter before this one is finished.  I wonder why the people who are well most of the time are not a great deal better contented!  I believe I should not mind anything much if I were only well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 

Notes

The ellipsis in the transcription indicates that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Atlantic notice:  It is as yet difficult to know of what review Jewett speaks. Generally, Atlantic reviews of her books were very positive, though Horace Scudder and others repeated that Jewett's scope was narrow and quiet.  Atlantic usually had some interest in speaking well of her work because good sales of her books and stories benefited the magazine.  Among the known commentary in Atlantic, only one review seems less than wholly complimentary, The Story of the Normans in Atlantic Monthly 59 (June 1887), 859.  It is difficult to believe that this would discourage her as much as she reports in this letter.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Sunday night
[ Before August 1891 ]*


My Dearest Fuff*

            . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  I have come across an enchanting book called Forty Years in a Moorland Parish*  --  the Parish of Danby not far from Whitby.  I dont think it is your kind of thing but I love it and find so much in it that is curiously familiar in works & ways to a Berwick herron.*  I must ask Mr. Lowell if he knows anything about him if he feels like talking when I see him again.  I mean to try to get out there this week.   Goodnight darling                        

from Pinny.*

 

 Notes

The ellipsis in the transcription indicates that this is a selection from the manuscript.

1891:  That she implies James Russell Lowell is chronically ill suggests that this is the final year of his life.  He died in August 1891.

Fuff: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Forty Years in a Moorland ParishJohn Christopher Atkinson (1814-1900) was an English Anglican priest, writer and antiquary. "His best-known work ... was a collection of local legends and traditions which he published in 1891, with the title Forty Years in a Moorland Parish."  He served the Parish of Danby (Yorkshire) from 1847 until his death.

Berwick herron:  Is this a misspelling? What Jewett refers to remains mysterious.  Assistance is welcome.

Mr. Lowell:  James Russell Lowell.  See Correspondents.  

Pinny: Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.    See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Greenleaf Whittier

South Berwick

Thursday [Spring before  September 1892]*

My dear Friend,

            I sent you a bottle of medicine yesterday afternoon, for I think it will do you good to “take a little sometin” as the old farmers say.  I think that two or three teaspoonfuls several times a day in a little milk would be a good prescription.

            I am so glad to have seen you and to know with my own eyes that you are on the mend.  I think with sorrow of being far away from you, and then I remember how near we are who love each other, and the time will fly fast at any rate until I am back again.

            Mary* and I had a dear call to remember and we both send you much love and to Mr. and Mrs. Cartland and Mrs. Pickard* if she is still there.  Dont try to write until by and by when you feel stronger.  Wait until the robbins [so transcribed] come and bring you a new pen.  Yesterday I was out driving and we thought we heard one and stopped the horses in the woods with great interest and then found that it was only the whiffle-tree* squeaking.

Yours most affectionately

 Sarah

 

Notes

before 1892:  This letter must have been composed between 1877, when Jewett and Whittier became acquainted, and September 1892, when Whittier died. A handwritten note on this transcription reads: Whittier.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mr. and Mrs. Cartland and Mrs. Pickard: Cary identifies Joseph Cartland (1810-1898) and Gertrude Cartland (1822-1911), who ac¬companied Whittier on his summer vaca¬tions in Maine and New Hampshire for five decades, and in whose home at New¬buryport, Massachusetts, he lived most of his last fifteen winters.
    See Samuel Thomas Pickard in Correspondents.

whiffle-tree: Usually whiffle-tree, this would be known to Jewett and Whittier as a mechanism for allowing horses to pull implements, especially in teams.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

         October. [1882 or after; before January 1901]*


     The two notes you sent me tonight are very dear prints of your footsteps along the path of life. A sentimental Pinny to express herself so, but she feels it to the bottom of her heart. Miss Grant# is in the full tide of successful narration. She described an acquaintance this morning as a "meek-looking woman, but very understanding!" I have not been writing today. I should have been called off at any rate a good deal, so I did some hammering and housekeeping this morning, and "box-pleated" sixteen breadths of silk ruffle this afternoon. (I think we shall have the little lace frock. It is not going to be a great deal of work, and is getting on capitally.)
 

Fields's note

# the village dressmaker.


Notes

1882 or later:  At this point, the earliest example of Jewett referring to herself as "Pinny" in letters to Fields comes from 1882.  Olive Grant, a South Berwick dressmaker, died in January 1901.  See Correspondents and Blanchard, pp. 38-9.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Monday night
[ 1882 or later ]

Dear Fuffy*

            What a dear letter came from you to night!  but I am afraid this will be a sleepy answer, since it is getting late.  I wrote until dark this afternoon, and then went out to walk in the early moonlight, way down the street by the Academy* and even up on the hill back of the Academy itself.  There is a great grey cloud in the west but all the rest of the sky was clear and it was very beautiful.  When one goes out of doors and wanders about alone at such a time, how wonderfully one becomes part of nature -- like an atom of quicksilver against a great mass.  I hardly keep my separate consciousness, but go on and on until the mood has spent itself.  I don’t know when I have ever enjoyed the fresh air as I did Saturday. . . . . . . . . . . .

                                    Yours always

                                          Pin*

 


Notes

The points at the end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

Fuffy: A Jewett nickname for Annie Adams Fields, which Jewett appears to have begun using in 1882, while the two were traveling together in Europe.  They began calling her "Pinny Lawson" at about the same time.

Academy: The Berwick Academy in South Berwick, ME, from which Jewett graduated.

Pin:  A Jewett and Fields nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett, short for Pinny Lawson.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

South Berwick

Monday night [ May after 1882 ]

Dearest Fuff

            We have had a delightful play day in York and I wished so much for you.  The clouds were lovely and the sea, and we all played like children.  Pinny* achieved a pretty house built with damp sand and sticked little weeds about it for trees and left the little mansion with regret, it being much admired by all observers -- and was a great play.  It was so warm that we sat in the grass above the beach and I stretched myself at full length and found a lot of nice blue violets next my face.  The grass had not grown there but they were, blooming away by themselves.  There were three or four old crows on the sands and a little schooner or two out at sea and the sun kept going behind a cloud and coming out again.  I saw Cora’s* house from a distance and it is very pretty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Your

Pin

Notes

The points at the end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

Fuff:  A Jewett nickname for Annie Adams Fields, which Jewett appears to have begun using in 1882, while the two were traveling together in Europe.  They began calling her "Pinny Lawson" at about the same time.

Cora's house:  This may be Cora Clark Rice, though her residence was in Boston. See Correspondents.

Pinny: A Jewett and Fields nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett, short for Pinny Lawson.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to "Abby"  [Abby Anneline Manning]*

 148 Charles St.

Thursday morning [After 1882]


Dear Abby

I look forward to the tea-party on Sunday with great pleasure.

Yours affectionately

 Sarah O. Jewett

P. S. I hope that you're not going to make your little round balls of minced meat exactly by Mrs. Masel's recipe! too much onion!!!!!


Notes

Abby:  While there is as yet no way to achieve certainty about the recipient's identity, the number of Jewett's known acquaintances in Boston who were named "Abby" is few.  Therefore, a likely prospect is Abby Anneline (Addy) Manning (1836-1906), the partner of the American sculptor, Anne Whitney. (1821-1915).  Paula Blanchard says that the couple were early friends of Annie Fields, and later of both Fields and Jewett (p. 215).
    Britannica.com says that Whitney maintained a studio in Boston after 1876.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


          Tuesday morning. [ Spring after 1883, probably before Whittier's death on 7 September 1892. ]

     It seems as if two leaves for one had suddenly come out on the trees. Yesterday afternoon I went to the funeral of an old patient of my father on one of the old farms -- where the neighbourhood minister preached and the old farmhouse was crowded with people -- and then we all walked out, two by two, across a broad green field, with old-fashioned pall-bearers carrying the coffin by hand and changing, -- first four would take it, and then four others who went before, just as it must have been in England two hundred years ago. There was such a long procession, a hundred and thirty or forty, and all in little flocks, -- the father and mother and their big and little children, by twos, following them, and then another father and mother and their children. Somehow it looked quite scriptural! and the burying-ground was a little square out in the middle of this great field, with tall high-standing trees shading it. The whole scene was most touching and simple and curiously archaic. Usually the farming people have the hearse come and do all the things that village people do.

     I have been reading a really wonderful little book by poor Richard Jefferies. I had never even heard of it - "The Story of My Heart," he calls it, but it is really the expression of his religious growth and aspiration toward higher things.* He finds little in conventional, or rather formulated religions, but everything in an eager belief in higher forms of life and unrevealed wisdom. He comes closer to these in out-of-door life, as one might expect who knows his other books, but his ability to put into words the consciousness of life and individuality and relationship to eternity is something amazing. I have never known anything just like it. I thought of "thy friend"# as I read it, and of "Phantastes,"* which I haven't read since I was growing up. There is a queer touch of Tolstoi's creeds now and then. This copy was printed in '83, -- how strange that I never knew anything of it!

     Tonight I saw the dear little new moon through the elm boughs; and have read part of one of Hawthorne's American Journal volumes but didn't care for it as much as I used to. On the contrary, I found the "Rambles about Portsmouth" a mine of wealth. One description of the marketwomen coming down the river, their quaintness and picturesqueness at once seem to be so great, and the mere hints of description so full of flavor, that it all gave me much keener pleasure than anything I found in the other much more famous book. This seems like high literary treason, but you wait and see. This was a volume of Hawthorne's younger journals, a conscious effort after material and some lovely enough notes of his walks and suggestions for sketches; but these last lack any reality or imagination, rootless little things that could never open seed in their turn, or make much of any soil they were put into, so "delicate" in their fancy as to be far-fetched and oddly feeble and sophomorish. You will find it hard to believe this without the pages before you as I have just had them. But oh! such material as I lit upon in the other book! one page flashes into my mind now as 'live as Kipling and as full of fresh air, and all the touches of brave fancy and quiet pathos. Let an old fellow like Brewster keep at it as he did, and he quietly brings you a ruby and a diamond, picked right up in a Portsmouth street.* Such genuine books always live, they get filled so full of life: it's neither Boswell nor Johnson* who can take the credit, but the Life on the pages.

"Too useful to be lonely and too busy to be sad."

That is the most lovely thing that Miss Phelps ever said or wrote.*

Fields's note

#Whittier.


Notes

poor Richard Jefferies. ... "The Story of My Heart": Richard Jefferies (1848-1887) was an English writer and naturalist, best remembered for his nature writing. The Story of My Heart (1883), perhaps his most famous work, caused some scandal upon its publication; it is a spiritual autobiography that tells of his growth into a kind of transcendentalism that rejects traditional Christianity.

"thy friend" ... and of "Phantastes": "Thy friend" is John Greenleaf Whittier, the Quaker poet. Phantastes: A Faery Romance for Men and Women (1858) is by the Scot, George MacDonald (1824-1905).

one of Hawthorne's American Journal volumes ... "Rambles about Portsmouth" ... Brewster: Nathaniel Hawthorne's (1804-1864) American Note Books appeared in several editions and forms beginning in 1868. Charles Warren Brewster's (1802-1868) Rambles about Portsmouth: Sketches of Persons, Localities, and Incidents of Two Centuries: Principally from Tradition and Unpublished Documents appeared in 1859 (First Series) and 1869 (Second Series).  The account of the market women is in "Second Series," Ramble 132. Jewett drew upon this description in Chapter 7 of The Tory Lover.

Boswell nor Johnson: James Boswell (1740-1795) published The Life of Samuel Johnson in 1791. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) was one of the most prominent English literary figures of the eighteenth century.

"Too useful to be lonely and too busy to be sad." ... Miss Phelps: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844-1911) was the author of Dr. Zay, a novel about an aspiring woman doctor, like Jewett's A Country Doctor. She probably was best known for her Spiritualist novel, The Gates Ajar. On-line searches for this quotation show it being repeated often soon after the publication of this letter, which suggests that few readers had seen it before 1911.  Perhaps Phelps spoke this to Jewett or wrote it in a letter to her?  Information regarding its source would be welcome.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[Sunday After 1883 ]*

Louisa* was here yesterday but I was out.  --  I met Miss Baker in front of the State House* yesterday and she thought for some time that I was you and speaked on that affectionate basis, and then discovered of a sudden that I was I and had to begin all over again holding fast my hand all through  --  so that I saw her some time in both capacities!

 

 Notes

Sunday After 1883:  This surmise arises from Blanchard indicating that the Jewetts first began to know Charlotte Alice Baker in 1883.
    Handwritten notes with this transcription read: [to Mary]      [Sunday]

Louisa:  Probably Louisa Dresel, though possibly Louisa Putnam Loring.  See Correspondents.

Miss Baker ... State House:  Miss Baker may be the American historian, Charlotte Alice Baker (1833-1909). According to Paula Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett (2002), the Jewett's became close to Baker and to the artist Susan Minot Lane (1832-1893) during the mid-1880s.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.





SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel

[ 1884 or later ]*

Dear Loulie

    Thursday shall be the day if you still wish, and I shall try to be prompt at one o'clock --

Yours affectionately
 
S. O. J.

Tuesday






Notes

1884 or later: As of this writing, the earliest letter of Jewett to Dresel is dated in 1884.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Columbia University (New York) Library in Special Collections, Jewett.  Transcription from a microfilm copy and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Louisa Dresel

Wednesday morning
[ 1884 or later ]*

[ Begin letterhead ]

148 Charles Street
    Boston.

[ End letterhead ]

Dear Loulie

    I think it will have to be next time! for I haven't an afternoon to my back and I must go home on Friday morning.

Yours affectionately

S.O.J.

( In haste! )



Notes

1884 or later: As of this writing, the earliest letter of Jewett to Dresel is dated in 1884.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Columbia University (New York) Library in Special Collections, Jewett.  Transcription from a microfilm copy and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Dresel


148 Charles St.
[ 1884 or later ]*

Dear Loulie

    I return "the other sketch" with many thanks for its company since Christmas but I love the new one and thank you for it twice over and over.  A. F.* likes it so much too.  I was sorry to miss you yesterday and now I am going home tomorrow but only for

[ Page 2 ]

a week or so.  I had a very nice time in Newport but I am pretty lame this day and so you must forgive my bad writing also a short note --

    With love to Mrs. Dresel*
Yours ever affectionately

S. O. J.



[ Page 3 ]


I am so glad to have seen the sketches the other day --

Notes

1884 or later: As of this writing, the earliest letter of Jewett to Dresel is dated in 1884.

A. F.:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Dresel:  For Mrs. Dresel, see Louisa Loring Dresel in Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Columbia University (New York) Library in Special Collections, Jewett.  Transcription from a microfilm copy and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel


Friday
[ 1884 or later ]*
  

[ Begin letterhead ]

South Berwick, Maine

[ End letterhead ]

Dear Loulie

    Thank you so much for your note and the kindest of messages from 'Mamma' -- I am afraid that we cannot come for the little visit because we have promised to go to the mountains for two or three days -- and must leave Mrs. Cabot's Thursday

[ Page 2 ]

to go there from here on Friday.  But the luncheon would be delightful and you can ask Mrs. Cabot and ^to^ set the day for us -- I believe that she has planned something for Wednesday the day before we leave, but we have not made any engagements, at least I have not.

    And you must come and call


[ Page 3 ]

very early! -- I have to write this in a hurry to catch the morning mail but I shall save the rest of my letter to talk about next week.

With love and thanks

S. O. J.


Notes

1884 or later: As of this writing, the earliest letter of Jewett to Dresel is dated in 1884.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Columbia University (New York) Library in Special Collections, Jewett.  Transcription from a microfilm copy and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel

South Berwick
Thursday --
[ 1884 or later ]*

Dear Loulie

    I have been spending two days in Exeter and when I came home last night I found your dear sketch which I like very much -- oh very much, and I like the little note on the pasteboard cover, and I think that I can 'tell' you better when I see you than I can in a letter [ two deleted words ]

[ Page 2 ]

[ deleted word ]

    Somehow eyes that are very poor for reading and writing, take great pleasure in pictures.  I dont know when I have enjoyed ours so much as in these winter days when I have often sat idly in my chair.  But dear friend you are always so thoughtful, and such

[ Page 3 ]

a friend to my little and great pleasures!  A.F.* and I sometimes turn thoughtful into thinkful, which has a meaning that will please you when you come to think of it!  I mean true sentiment when I say that the little picture indeed is a new window set open.  I shall not forget to look out of it.  You must tell

[ Page 4 ]

me still more about the place when I see you again.  That will be next week.  I h;pe to go to town Tuesday or Wednesday --

    Yours with a great deal of love.

S. O. J.


Notes

1884 or later: As of this writing, the earliest letter of Jewett to Dresel is dated in 1884.

A. F
.:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Columbia University (New York) Library in Special Collections, Jewett.  Transcription from a microfilm copy and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

 

Thursday morning
[ After 1884 ]

Dearest Fuff*

            I am so distracted by a charming three of Italian musicians who now play Santa Lucia* under my window that I have doubts about this letter's turning out very well as to hard facts.  (Now they go into another air which starts me up the grand canal so that I suppose I must have heard it there!)  They are gathering an idle crowd out of the village and I must  --  in fact I have descended, and ascertained the fact that Napoli was their home and we have bowed many times and been as polite as we know how in our best moments.  They now play The Anvil Chorus* with a bent pin some where in a fiddle string, perhaps for the family seems [illegible] of over generosity!!  but what a funny bit of gayety they bring into a sober New England village.  Deacon Litchfield of the Baptist Church* stands in his shop door with his foot twitching in his big shoe as if it might dance any minute.

               We went to Portsmouth yesterday and had a delightful drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Notes

After 1884:  Jewett wrote another letter to Annie Fields, tentatively dated in April 1884, in which she describes almost identical events.  It seems unlikely that she wrote both letters in the same year.  Probably this letter was written at a later date.
    The ellipsis in the transcription indicates that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Santa Lucia:  According to Wikipedia, this is a traditional Neapolitan song: "The original lyrics ... celebrate the picturesque waterfront district, Borgo Santa Lucia, in the Bay of Naples, in the invitation of a boatman to take a turn in his boat, to better enjoy the cool of the evening."

Anvil Chorus: According to Wikipedia, is from act 2, scene 1 of Giuseppe Verdi's 1853 opera Il Trovatore (1853): "It depicts Spanish Gypsies striking their anvils at dawn ... and singing the praises of hard work, good wine, and Gypsy women."

Deacon Litchfield of the Baptist Church:  Deacon Litchfield has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Thursday morning. [1885 - 1889]


     I mourn for poor Crabby -- poor little dog! I hate to think we shall never see him again. I never liked him so much as I have this summer, in his amiable and patient age. However, I had worried much about what should come next when he was blinder and feebler, and it is good to think that his days are done so comfortably. I am sure all the girls felt sorry as we do.

     It is a grey day and looks like a cold rain, but John and Theodore, like "Benjy" and "Tom Brown," have gone to the Rochester fair, with smiles on their faces that seemed to tie behind and be quite visible as they walked away!*
 

     I have been reading "Miss Angel." It is a most lovely historical story. If you haven't got it, I want to send my little Tauchnitz one. Venice is so exquisitely drawn in it, and afterward in London, all the life of that day. Dr. Johnson comes along the street as if one's own eyes saw him. I think you have got "Miss Angel," but perhaps you can't put a hand on it.

     I took down the two Choate volumes,# yesterday, and read with unforgettable delight, -- not that it was new altogether, but somehow new then.

Fields's note

#The biography of Rufus Choate.*

Notes

poor Crabby:  F. O. Matthiessen in Sarah Orne Jewett (1909) identifies Crabby as one of Jewett's dogs, and he describes her walking with Crabby, when he already is an elderly dog, before her father's death (20 September 1878).  Yet, Theodore, her nephew, was born in 1879 and, presumably, would have to be older than 5 or 6 to go off to the fair with John Tucker.  In the opening of Tom Brown's School Days, Tom is about 10 years old.

John and Theodore, like "Benjy" and "Tom Brown," have gone to the Rochester fair:  John Tucker, Jewett family employee, and Theodore "Stubby" Eastman, Jewett's nephew.  See Correspondents.
    Thomas Hughes (1822-1896) was the author of Tom Brown's School Days (1857).
    The reference to Benjy is mysterious.  Juliana Horatia Gatty Ewing (1841-1885) wrote a popular children's story, Benjy in Beastland, apparently first published in Aunt Judy's Magazine 8 (1870).  Thereafter it was frequently reprinted in collections of children's stories.

"Miss Angel" .. Tauchnitz one ... Dr. Johnson: Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) was a prolific and multi-talented English writer and lexicographer, known for his witty conversation. Miss Angel by Anne Thackeray, Lady Ritchie (1837-1919) appeared in a Tauchnitz edition from Leipzig in 1875. In The Atlantic (April 1882: 563-4) is an appreciative essay on the history of Tauchnitz editions, high quality inexpensive reprints of English and American literary works usually published in partnership with their authors, but free of copyright restrictions.

The biography of Rufus Choate: a two volume book on Rufus Choate (1799-1859) is The works of Rufus Choate: with a memoir of his life (1862).

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Sunday afternoon
[ 1887 or after ]


Oh dear Fuff*

 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

            I have been writing Marigold* today and telling her we are going.  What rainsome weather it is nowadays though I did get quite a walk up the street and was chased by a shower and felt so much better for it  --  just before dark.  John* hovered about the house this morning after giving delightful hints about the high surf that must be beating the Wells shore, and the cliff but I was afraid to risk the dampness and at last consoled him by saying that we had seen it splashing over the Cliff* as high as ever it went and we smiled together and contented ourselves with reminiscences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Your own

     S. O. J.

 
Notes

1887 or after: As of this writing, the earliest known instance of Jewett using the nickname "Marigold" for Mary Greenwood Lodge occurs in 1887.
    The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Marigold: Mary Langdon Greenwood (Mrs. James) Lodge.   See Correspondents.

John: John Tucker. See Correspondents.

the CliffYork Harbor, ME is known in part for "The Cliff Walk ...an ancient shoreline path lined with beach roses, [that] winds along Eastern Point ledges above the surf."  The surrounding area has long included summer residences.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

  Wednesday night

[ 1887 or after ]

Dear Mary

                   ………I think that D. Merriman D. D.* had better make a sermon on one of the ten commandments saying that we mustn't work, but never saying that we mustn't play.  I do believe myself that judging from both the Old Testament and the New that we have got Sunday all wrong!

 
Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

1887 or after:  The earliest mention of the Merrimans in Jewett's letters appears to be 1887.

D. Merriman D. D.:  Daniel Merriman.  See Helen Bigelow Merriman in Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.
 


SOJ to Samuel W. Marvin


148 Charles St
2nd April. [Between 1886 and 1897]

Dear Mr. Marvin

    How much trouble you have taken for me! -- I am not going to be tempted by the Atlantic -- to tell the truth I care a great deal more for the original gold and white cover, in this case, than for the best binding of any other sort.

Mrs. Fields had it once and was foolish enough to let it be used up at the press in making a new American edition and I have heard her lament the loss of it, and so I thought it would be a jolly bit of a surprise to hunt up another copy and leave it on one of the shelves to be discovered.* -- I think $15 is all the price I ought to put on my enjoyment, and I beg you not to hunt for the book, only if a copy comes in your way at anytime I should like to have it -- You see I am beginning to catch the "first edition" fever alittle [so transcribed]  --  from being in this well-stocked house I suppose!  -- I am going southward for a while for I have been ill (and half well) for ever so many weeks, and I  hope to be able to spend a few days in New York on my way home.*  I like to hear about Miss Eleanor (Marvin)* and I should like better to see her --

Yor Sincerely

SOJewett [so transcribed


Notes

Between 1886 and 1897:  See notes below for evidence that this letter probably was composed within this period.

discovered:  Though it is impossible to identify the book's title, the gesture does show an interesting facet to the Jewett-Fields relationship.

southward for a while:  To date, there is only one record of a trip south undertaken by Jewett for her own health, when she and Fields traveled to St. Augustine, Fl arriving in February 1890.  Unfortunately, the dates of that trip do not match well with the April date of this letter.  Other documented, health related trips to less distant places, but in a generally southward direction include:

    August 1886:  Richfield Springs, NY
    October 1893: Richfield Springs, NY
    August 1894: Richfield Springs, NY
    March 1897:  Hot Springs, VA

These also fail to match up with the April date of this letter.  However, they place such trips within the same decade, and all follow the birth of Eleanor Marvin.

Miss Eleanor (Marvin)The Prater/Prather Genealogy indicates that Marvin married Susan Maria Decker in October 1872.  Their four children included Eleanor Sands Marvin  (18 Aug 1885 - 19 December 1975).  She married Fred Schrater in 1919. See also:  Eleanor Sands Marvin Schrater.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


[ 1888 or later ]

I went to Mrs. Cabot’s* to dinner yesterday and we settled almost everybody down hard, and if they had been flies on the wall they would have known very well what to think of themselves.  Then I went to see about the green curtains for the Library and found a nice little man who remembered all about the others and he is coming down Monday morning next so we must remember about telling Rose* when I get home.

 

Notes

1888 or later: A handwritten note on this transcription reads: To Mary Thursday evening  This guess at the date is based on the probability that the Jewett sisters are decorating their home after the death of their uncle William Durham Jewett in 1887.  Renovations on the house were under way in the spring of 1888, while Jewett was traveling in the south.  However, curtains for the library could have been bought at any time from 1888 on.

Mrs. Cabot's:  Susan Burley Cabot.  See Correspondents.

curtains for the Library ... Rose: The Jewetts may be purchasing curtains for the library in their home, but this is not yet certain, nor has Rose been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 73, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Katharine and Louisa Loring
[ After Christmas, 1888 or later ]*

148 Charles Street
Wednesday

My dear Katharine and Louisa

        Your dear presents came straight to my heart and I thank you both very much.  I thought of you, too, though I gave no sign of it -- When I came to town a few days before Christmas I was full of Plans but it was a joggling car ^that brought me^ and set the pain in this old head going and I meekly retired to bed . . .  All right now, thank you! (though more or less damaged as a general thing) and wondering

[ Page 2 ]

if you wont be coming to town some day so that I can see you.  Neither Mrs. Fields* nor I can remember or guess just who Louisa's lovely French Diana is and familiar as she is already -- and seemed to be at first glance -- we dont know her proud name. I like her very much.  And dear K's letter case is what I like.  I 'find' this as our French friends say, a great beauty -- it somehow goes with my best purse and I should like to see them together ----

[ Page 3 ]

    I hope you had a happy Christmas but you did because you made one. -- I thought many times of you with the sea and the winter woods, and I could believe -- almost -- that I was walking along the avenue to see you and hearing ^the noise of^ the brook now and then in the stillness.

    Many a day I think of you both and send you my love and blessing, dear friends!

Yours most affectionately
Sarah ---------------

[ Page 4 ]

Mrs. Fields sends her love too and asks me to tell you how pleased she is with the cover for her dressing table.  She took a great liking to it and loved to have you remember her --

Notes

After Christmas, 1888 or later:  This letter offers little information for determining its date.  We know from SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett, St. Augustine, Monday [March 4, 1888], that Jewett and Fields became acquainted with the Loring sisters and their father while traveling in Florida and South Carolina in March of 1888.  However, they may have met earlier.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held in the Manuscript File -- Sarah Orne Jewett, at the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center of Boston University.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel

148 [Charles street]
Thursday [Between 1888 and 1904]

Dear Loulie

I wonder if you have got home yet? I am afraid I shall miss seeing you after all for I must go home tomorrow but I shall very soon bee becoming [so transcribed] down again -- I may say of the buttons that they shine so in the skies of my imagination that I easily mistake them for planets. To day is the day of Mrs. Whitman's fair.* How I wish I could see you coming in!  I shall be there until early afternoon and again this evening.

With love
S. O. J.

 I had such a nice time with Ellis* the other day!

Notes


1904:  Correspondence between Dresel and Jewett seems to begin in 1888 and continues until Jewett's death.  Mrs. Whitman died in 1904.

Mrs. Whitman's fair:  Sarah Wyman Whitman; See Correspondents.  Whitman was very active in her church and in volunteer community service, which included organizing fund-raising fairs.

Ellis:  Ellis Dresel, Louisa's younger brother.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel


Sunday afternoon [Winter between 1888 and 1909]

Dear Loulie

I started out this afternoon to go down to see you but I did not feel quite well enough to stay "out and about" so long and had to come home again.  I begin to think that the grippe must be going to assail me annually! I have felt like a second edition of it lately -- and the little snow storm also proved unkind -- I am going away tomorrow for the night, but I shall hope to see you when I come back, I was very sorry to miss you yesterday.

Yours affectionately

 S. O. J.


Notes

1909:  Correspondence between Dresel and Jewett seems to begin in 1888 and continues until Jewett's death.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Tuesday morning, [1890 or after]


     What do you think I am reading but "Middlemarch," though I confess that I have to make skips often. How much more she dwells and harps than in "Adam Bede" and "Silas Marner."* She draws her characters so that they stand alive before you, and you know what they have in their pockets, and then goes on for three pages analyzing them and their motives; but after all one must read them with patience for the sake of occasional golden sentences, that have the exactness and inevitableness of proverbs. Perhaps I read my "Middlemarch" too late in the evening, but I find very dull stretches in it now and then. But think of Mr. Casaubon being but forty-five at the time of his marriage! I think of him as nearly seventy and old for his years at that, and indeed be must have been growing old since he was born, and never have had a season of merely ripening. It is a wonderfully drawn character to me, the pathos and reality of it. How I should like to go on talking about it.

     What do you think I am reading with deepest interest but Mahan's "Influence of Sea Power on History,"* which is perfectly delightful! I don't know whether you would care much about it, though it is not too technical and nautical, but rather historical. One thing is so nice, about the fleets that are attacked having the best chance (according to the French). They stay in their places while the enemy comes at them, but wastes power in coming, and then, the principle holding good from the days of galleys until now, the attacked fleet has kept its power in reserve and its men fresh to resist. You get so interested before you know it. I have been interested in what I saw about the book for a long time, and I find it a great pleasure to have it. The use of English words is so fresh and good and the whole tone so manly and sailor-like.

     Well, I mustn't write about folkses this busy morning, but tell important tales about my walking up the garden yesterday afternoon, and hearing a great buzz-buzzing over among the apple trees, and seeing the whole air brown with a swarm of bees, and rushing for one of the old hives and trying to take them; but off they went, leaving part of their company about some comb which they had fastened on a bough of a tree, a thing I never saw before. Minnie, who is an experienced country person from Bantry Bay, as we have long known, came out ringing a bell as if she were one of those who took the bees in that pretty "Georgic" of Virgil.* There never was anything simpler or prettier. We got the remainder bees and their pieces of white new comb into the hive, and there they are, I suppose, in all the rain. I coveted the big swarm that went away. It was such a pretty, lucky thing to go out and find them.


Notes

"Middlemarch" ... "Adam Bede" ... "Silas Marner": George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans, 1819-1880) wrote the novels Adam Bede (1859), Silas Marner (1861), and Middlemarch (1871-2).

Mahan's "Influence of Sea Power on History": Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was a distinguished American naval officer and historian. The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783, was published in 1890.
    It is possible Jewett is reading in preparation for her work on The Tory Lover, which includes naval engagements during the American Revolution.

Minnie:  The Trafton Collection transcription of the final paragraph (see below) adds the information that Minnie is an employee in Carrie Eastman's household.  More information is welcome.

that pretty "Georgic" of Virgil: At about line 64 of Book 4 of The Georgics, Virgil (Publius Vergilius Maro, 70-19 BC) recommends the prospective beekeeper to "raise a noise / Of tinkling all around, and shake the Cymbals / Of the Mighty Mother" in order to call a swarm of bees to a new hive.
    The Trafton collection includes a transcription of the final paragraph of this letter; this varies in many details from the Fields transcription.  His transcription reads:
Well, I mustn’t write about folks in this busy morning, but tell important tales about my walking up the garden yesterday afternoon and hearing a great buzz-buzzing over among the apple trees and seeing the whole air brown with a swarm of bees, and rushing for one of the old hives and trying to take them, but off they went leaving part of their company about some comb which they had fastened on a bough of a tree, a thing I never saw before.  Carrie's Minnie who is an experienced country person from Bantry Bay as we have long known! came out ringing a bell as if she were one of those who took the bees in that pretty "Georgic of Virgil".  There never was anything simpler or prettier . We got the remainder bees and their pieces of white new comb in to the hive and there they are I suppose in all the rain.  I coveted the big swarm that went away!  It was such a pretty lucky thing to go out and find them.
There is also a signature:   

        from your
         Pinny

The Trafton text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, folder 63, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.





SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett



Sunday noon
[ Probably after 1890 ]

Dear Mary
 
But as for Brother Robert* we must be having other privileges.  You never heard anything so dear as he was after I came yesterday -- telling A. F.* all over again about going to Berwick last summer.  "They put on the beautiful old blue china"  he said -- "all their beautiful things; they didn't say to themselves  'Oh its only old Robert Collyer and his folk' --  no, they had everything beautiful!"  "Best they'd got", I said, and he gave one of his funny laughs, but he did speak with such feeling Mary.  I was all of a choke so we couldn't continue the conversation.

 
Notes

Probably after 1890:  Robert Collyer first appears in a Jewett letter in 1890.

Brother Robert
:  Dr. Robert Collyer. See Correspondents.  It is not yet known in what year he visited South Berwick.

A.F.:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Wednesday

[ 1890s before 1896 ]


Dear Mary

We are going to the funeral* now and how hard it does rain! a real north easter, when yesterday was such a lovely day.  I was hard at work writing until afternoon when we went to walk and met Mrs. Bell and Mrs. Pratt* who had much to say.  I meant to write you a good long letter in the evening but I got reading by the fire and forgot it and then went off to bed early.

I have got a long list of things to do in town but it is so wet that I dont know how are I shall get along.  Mrs. Fields is going to Chardon St.*  The corduroy is 27 inches wide -- cant you measure somewhere near allowing a good bit over for new arms and a cushion?  It isnt likely we can match it easily.  Please let me know as soon as you can.  This is but a poor letty but it is an early morning.

Much love from

Sister
 

Notes

1890s before 1896:  A handwritten note on this transcription reads:189-?  Though the rationale for this guess is not known, to date there are no references to Mrs. Ellerton Pratt in Jewett's letters before 1888; Pratt died in 1896.

funeral: It is not yet known to which funeral Jewett refers.

Mrs. Bell and Mrs. Pratt:  The sisters, Helen Choate (Mrs. Joshua) Bell and Miriam (Mrs. Ellerton) Pratt, both were members of the Fields-Jewett circle of artistic friends. See Correspondents

Mrs. Fields is going to Chardon St.:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents. Chardon Street in Boston, is the location of the Charity Building, where among other offices were those of the Associated Charities.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 73, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


 Thursday evening
[ Summer between 1892 and 1896 ]


Dear Mary

There are those who are dressing themselves for tea in a room over head so sweet and contented, and the tide is out and all the pretty seaweed showing in nice colors.  I thought you would like to know… Oh such pretty stories of Bar Harbor life* have been going on all day, and Carrie* & I laughing so and wishing that you were present to have the first freshness.  I met A.F.* at the train and I happened to say something that you said, as we came along, and she turned to me with such an eager look: Oh is Mary here? and was so disappointed

[rest of letter missing]


Notes

Summer between 1892 and 1896: A handwritten note on this transcription reads: 189-.  This date range is determined by the death dates of Carrie and Ned Eastman.  See below.

Bar Harbor life:  Bar Harbor, ME is a resort town on Mount Desert Island, near what is now Acadia National Park. It is not yet known when Jewett may have visited Bar Harbor with his sister Carrie, but presumably this would have been between the death of Ned Eastman in March 1892 and her own in April 1897.

Carrie:  Carrie Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 73, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.





SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel


South Berwick

14th October

[ Between 1892 and 1899 ]*

Dear Loulie

    I wonder if you can come over to Manchester on Monday?  Perhaps you will send a line.  I shall have to come back on Tuesday -- so that I am planning out my time with as much care as possible.  I had a cheerful laugh over

[ Page 2 ]
 
the likeness of Loulie and the poor thin pussy!  I should long to know how much more she ^he^ weighs than sixteen pounds.  I should go to the next shop and be weighed first with him & then without him, this being an easy manner of ascertaining the weight of a Cat.  I dont think it is so good a likeness of you that I could not be parted

[ Page 3 ]

from it, so if you really care to have it back again you may!  But I feel as if I had had a very nice glimpse of you.  Do bring the mountain sketches.

Yours affectionately
S. O. J.   

I am to have my nephew* with me and he has not been quite well of late, so that I shall have to stay by and not be quite so free as usual.


Notes

Between 1892 and 1899:  While it is possible this letter could have been composed any time between Jewett opening correspondence with Dresel around 1884 and Jewett's death in 1909, the more likely period is between the death of Theodore Eastman's father in 1892 and Theodore starting college in 1897.

nephew:  Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Columbia University (New York) Library in Special Collections, Jewett.  Transcription from a microfilm copy and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 [Friday morning, 1892 or later]

 

I am so beat by “Liz Frances’s”* will!  Old whoppet* -- why didn’t she do well by little Mary instead of Daddy Street* and others! -- and he having a saintly smile of vain satisfaction already!!  Your sister is very mad and after all their attention and affection all these years to leave little Mary with a lot of bother on her hands.  Well, she will have her part that’s all I can say.  It mortifies your sister.  We must accept John’s letter* and send him something at new Year or some other time.  So no more at  present from

                                                                                                Your affectionate

                                                                                                    S. O. J.

With a beautiful letter from Therese.*


Notes

1892 or later:  The earliest letter collected at this writing that refers to Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc simply as "Therese" rather than "Madame Blanc" is from 1894.  However, it seems likely that Jewett may have used her first name any time after their first meeting in 1892.
    Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Friday Morning]. 

“Liz Frances’s” will! ... Old whoppet ... little Mary ... Daddy Street:  The people and incident to which Jewett refers are not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.
    Jewett appears to have invented the word "whoppet" as a negative description of Liz Frances.  The word does not appear in contemporary dictionaries or in the OED.  Twenty-first century usage seems clearly irrelevant. 

John's letter: Normally, a reference to John would be John Tucker, but that is not really clear in this letter.  See Correspondents.

Therese:  Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc.  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett and Carrie Jewett Eastman


Tuesday morning
[ Spring between 1892 and 1894 ]*


Dear Girls

    It is such a great rain that I dont believe you can start Mary, with the stage ride in view! but there is one comfort -- it will be much pleasanter afterward.  It bears the marks of being very dry here ----  My train didn't stop at Beverly so I had to go on to Salem and there I refreshed myself with orange soda (Stubby* knows where!) and took the electric car and came to Beverly and got a conveyance from old Mr. Murphy* which took me to Mrs. Cabots.*

    She wasn't quite dressed

[ Page 2 ]

but had me up and gently detained me to dinner and it being past two by that time I was glad to stay.  She looks a little pale but ^having^ felt the  heat very much [ = ?] She was perfectly enchanted with Theodore's lilacs which have been blooming away as if they never felt the sun too much for a single moment.  She liked the note too so that altogether he made her a real pleasure.  "The Trimbles"* -- her old friends

[ Page 3 ]

from New York are making her a good visit so she wont feel the absence ^lack^ of mine.  Then I was sent down at four in the Victoria* in fine style and found Mrs. Fields* and Dr. Holmes* sitting out on the piazza in the warm sunshine -- it being the end of a long long call.  He seems better, but much changed from last winter.  May Wigglesworth* came up very cheerful to make a call, and we had a cup of tea.  It was a perfectly lovely afternoon.

    There was the funniest little gell [meaning girl] on the electric car [unrecognized word] as we were

[ Page 4 ]

starting out of Salem -- with a red dress and ^a^ cropped head.  She had reached the age of some six years and sat up so prim and neat -- but when the conductor came along she wasn't prepared with her fare, and looked so pleasant and told the passengers she was going to Beverly Cove* to a picnic.  The conductor laughed and we all did and she was so pleasant all the time looking round and bobbing her head like a bird and being ascertained to live in Derby St.* was set off there with best wishes from the crowd and she stepped off as prim and little! a funny Pinny* as I ever saw.  She really made me think of myself running away

[ Page 5 ]

at her age; that sense of enjoyment and all!  Beverly Cove looked quiet as I came through.  I dont believe there was any picnic going in any direction.  Well little John* will be going and I must get my letter ready.  I hoped to get over to see Alice Howe* today but I shall have to keep me in out of the wet.  Love to all not forgetting Susy and Frances.*

from your affectionate
Sarah.

Greenheads* entered the train in large numbers --



Notes

Spring between 1892 and 1894:  Blooming lilacs indicates late spring.  As the letter does not refer to Theodore's father, it seems likely the letter was composed after Edwin Eastman's death in March 1892 and before the death of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes in October 1894.

Stubby:  Theodore Eastman Jewett. See Correspondents.

old Mr. Murphy:  This person has not be identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Mrs Cabot
:  Susan Burley Cabot. See Correspondents.

The Trimbles ... from New York: This family remains unidentified, though their name appears in several Jewett letters.  Prominent New York Trimbles of Mrs. Cabot's generation would be the banking family of Merritt Trimble (1824-1903) and Mary Sutton Underhill (1826-1908).  Their son was Walter Underhill Trimble (1857- 8 September 1926).  However, as yet, no connection between them and Mrs. Cabot has been found.

Victoria: A victoria is an "elegant" four-wheeled open carriage, to be drawn by horses.

Mrs. Fields and Dr. Holmes:    Annie Adams Fields and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. See Correspondents.  They are on the piazza at Mrs. Fields's Gambrel House on Thunderbolt Hill in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts.

May Wigglesworth:  This may be Henrietta May Goddard Wigglesworth (1804- February 15, 1895), wife of Edward Wigglesworth (1804-1876), a Boston merchant, philanthropist, and man of letters. Among their children was Dr. Edward Wigglesworth (1840-1896), who served as a Union medical officer in the American Civil War, before becoming a professor at Harvard Medical School and a specialist in skin disease.

Beverly Cove ... Derby St.:  Beverly Cove is a small inlet in Beverly, MA, a few miles west of Pride's Crossing, where Susan Burley Cabot resided. Derby Street in Salem, includes the location of the Salem Maritime National Historic Site, roughly parallel to Salem Harbor.  The runaway six-year-old, then, was not able to get far from home on her street-car adventure.

Pinny:  A Jewett nickname.  See Correspondents.

little John: Presumably a Fields family employee.

Alice Howe:  Alice Greenwood Howe. See Correspondents.

Susy and Frances:  Susy may be Susan Marcia Oakes Woodbury, and Frances is likely to be cousin Frances Fisk Perry, daughter of Lucretia Morse Fisk Perry.  See Correspondents.

Greenheads:  Jewett probably refers to an abundance of biting greenhead horseflies, a summer nuisance in coastal areas of New England. 

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in the Jewett Family Papers MS014.02.01.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[Manchester, Mass., Ju__]
Thursday morning
[ After September 1892 ]

 

…..…Yesterday I read and set on the piazza and finished covering a cushion that A. F.* had begun and late in the afternoon we walked over to the Towne place, and saw the new people MacMillian* -- who owns it and have made the house much larger.  It looks very much handsomer and pleasant.  There is a new piazza on the end this way which is a great piece of sense  --  the other was almost always too windy. The people havent moved in yet but we had a few minutes with them and were all friendly together.

 
Notes

A transcriber's note with this text reads: [Manchester, Mass., Ju ---  SOJ  to MRJ  So. Berwick, Maine].  The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

A. F.: Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Towne place ... MacMillian:  Benjamin Hill's The North Shore of Massachusetts Bay (1881), mentions the charming English villa in Manchester-by-the-Sea, summer residence of Mrs. John Henry Towne of Philadelphia (p. 51). Maria R. Tevis Towne (1822 - 12 September 1892) .  John Henry Towne (1818-1875) was an engineer who was successful as a designer of heavy steam ships and a major contributor to University of Pennsylvania science programs.  In Memories of a Hostess, Fields recalls a call by Mrs. Towne at Manchester by the Sea in August of 1872.
    The identity of the new owner, MacMillian, is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Lilla Cabot Perry


148 Charles Street
 Sunday afternoon  [1891 -1897, or 1901-1905]

Dear Mrs Perry

Mrs. Fields asks me to say, with best thanks for all three of us that we have an engagement just at the time of your music this afternoon. And that we regret having to decline so great a pleasure. Yours sincerely

S. O. Jewett


Notes

1891 -1897, or 1901-1905:  According to Wikipedia, Lilla Cabot Perry spent a significant portion of her career abroad, mainly in France (1887-1891) and then in Japan (1897-1901).  She was in France again, beginning in 1905, not returning to Boston permanently until 1908.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.




Charles Street, Boston to Mellen Chamberlain

John Alden says this letter regards "a young Irish-American whom the two ladies wished to befriend, named Henry Coyle.* Nothing appears to have come of their efforts, but Coyle himself achieved a worthy career in Catholic publishing and charitable circles in Boston, in addition to publishing several volumes of poetry: 

            Mrs. Fields has just come up stairs to me to ask if I will not write this note for her to you about a young man who has come to her for help. He has done some very good work in verse and con¬sidering his youth, shows a touch of real promise but the poor fel¬low is so beaten back by illness and poverty that he is in a sad way. His disabilities hinder him in what he is trying to make of himself as a compositor. Mrs. Fields thinks that you may know of something to recommend to him in library channels familiar to you, where his acquaintance with books and his carefulness with his pen may be of use. He spoke of you gratefully in answer to her mention of your name, as "a kind and approachable man" -- so that we are following our own instinct in sending him to you. We shall try to do what we can for him too.
            I wish that we might sometimes see you. I have not been in town this winter however except for some brief visits.

Notes

Henry Coyle:  Biographical information about the poet, Henry Boyle, seems scanty.  The following biographical sketch appears in Donahoe's Magazine 39 (1898) pp. 74-5.

Coyle

WorldCat gives his birth year as 1865 and lists the following publications:

The Promise of Morning (poems, 1899)
Our Church, Her Children and Institutions (1908).  (Link to Volume 1 of 3)
Lyrics of Faith and Hope (poems, 1913)

This biographical sketch appears in The Poets of Ireland (1891) p. 85.

COYLE, HENRY. -- The Promise of Morning, poems, Boston, Mass., 1899.
Born at Boston, Mass., June 7, 1867. His father was a Connaught man, and his mother from Limerick. He is self-educated, and has written frequently for American journals, including verse for Harper's Bazaar, Detroit Free Press, Boston Transcript, Catholic Union and Times (Buffalo), and Boston Pilot. Is now assistant-editor of Orphan's Bouquet, Boston, of which James Riley {q.v.) is editor.

    Further and more consistent information would be welcome.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Tuesday morning

[ Between 1898 and 1902 ]*

Your affectionate sister encloses a little good pair of gloves and omitted them yesterday & Saturday beside only because she forgetted them.  It is a very beautiful cool morning and I am going to make the most of it going on with my work until noon when we are bespoken to Juniper Hill to luncheon with Josie Dexter & Gracie Howe.*  I wish that you were coming too.  We had great plans laid for going over to Alice Howe’s* yesterday afternoon but a big thunder shower came up all of a sudden and then cleared away again when it was too late to start.  We spent a quiet day.  I had a good many letters to write early and then I went to writing on a little poor story.  There were those who were very active with early walks and proper seeing to things & some company but I dont think of much to write about.  I should be greatly obliged if Mr. Stubs would take off the black paint from the Viking gentleman* and should deem it a useful service in the great cause of art.  I think there is something very pleasing about him -- there is a nice touch of carving about the hemlet as I used to pronounce it.  I thought that Emily and Dr. Mary* were only going to pass a night but they may have designed a larger plan.  I hope that they would be the kind that one could have a word, with, but I dont know that our friend returned from Foxcroft much settled.  Poor Mrs. Hale has been through with many trials, and now that I think of it Mr. Hale and Mr. William Huntress* seem to have had much the same idea about public trusts!  I hope that Sarah Leah* will go on with the type writing as fast as she can by day! and if by any chance she should have got it done I should like to have it.  Perhaps it will be good for her after the visit.  So no more at present from your loving sister with much love to Stubby, and a nice pat to Mr. T. Toes

We are going to town tomorrow.


Notes

Between 1898 and 1902:  A handwritten note on this transcription reads: 189-. This date range places the letter between Jewett's first meeting with Emily Tyson in 1898 and the carriage accident that brought an end to Jewett's fiction writing.

Juniper Hill to luncheon with Josie Dexter & Gracie Howe:  Though Josie Dexter is mentioned in several letters, she remains unidentified, though she may be connected in some way with Mrs. Fred Dexter, who also is mentioned several times in Jewett's letters.  Likewise, Juniper Hill and Gracie Howe have not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Alice Howe's:  Alice Greenwood Howe.  See Correspondents.

Mr. Stubs ... the black paint from the Viking gentleman: This reference is unknown.  Normally, Mr. Stubs would be Stubby or Theodore Jewett Eastman, but in this case, it may not be. See Correspondents. The word "hemlet" also needs explanation.

Emily and Dr. Mary:  At this writing, the only "Emily" mentioned in Jewett's letters is Emily Tyson.  See Correspondents. What is meant by Foxcroft is not certain, but possibly Tyson has spent some time in Foxcroft (Now Dover-Foxcroft), ME,  
    Dr. Mary remains unidentified.  Assistance is welcome.

Poor Mrs. Hale ... Mr. Hale and Mr. William Huntress:  The incident referred to here remains unexplained and the people not identified.  It may be that this Mr. Hale of South Berwick stands accused of some breach of the public trust, and this may relate to a Maine Supreme Court case of the "Inhabitants of South Berwick v. William Huntress et al." from 1864 which involved a dispute over a bond that was delivered with blanks to be filled in (Cases on the Law of Suretyship, pp. 49ff.) 
    Several people named William Huntress lived in the South Berwick area during Jewett's lifetime.  Three of them seem likely candidates: William H. Huntress (1844-1903) and William M. Huntress (1848-1926), and his father, William W. Huntress (1817-1894).

Sarah Leah:  Sarah Leah, apparently of South Berwick, worked as Jewett's typist and is mentioned in several letters.  However no details about her identity have been discovered as of this writing. 

Stubby, and a nice pat to Mr. T. Toes: Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.
    Mr. T. Toes seems to be a family pet, perhaps the dog, Timmy, who appears in Jewett letters from 1894 to 1903.  Information is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 73, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to "Sally"*


Friday afternoon
[Between 1894 and 1903]*

Dear Sally

I was in Cambridge this morning after I saw you and asked Sally Norton* about the stories, thinking there was a chance about Margaret* since she so loves a school. And Sally at once said 'Oh Helen Child and her sister!* They have a charming gift for story telling!"

'Ten minutes at a time" said I -- "and all clear and definite?"  -- and she said yes. So I pass this answer on to you at once. I hope it will prove to be of some help. I think that the ballads & folk-lore they couldn't help knowing would be the best of funds to draw from.

Yours affectionately

 S. O. Jewett


Notes

Between 1894 and 1903: Sorting out the problems of this letter leads to tantalizing possibilities, but little conclusive about the recipient or the date. As the letter recounts a talk with Sara (Sally) Norton and mentions Helen Child, daughter of Harvard professor Francis James Child, one may infer that it was composed after the earliest letter we have between Jewett and Norton in October 1894, and before the death of Helen Child in 1903.  However, Jewett recounts meeting Norton in a letter to Mary Rice Jewett of March 22, 1888, so there may be earlier correspondence between them.

Sally:  Sally Fairchild (1869-1960) is a possible recipient, one of the few local people named "Sally," in addition to Sarah (Sally) Norton, with whom there is evidence Jewett had contact.  Sally Fairchild wrote one letter to Mary Jewett in 1924 that is held by Harvard's Houghton Library.  Also at the Houghton are letters between Fairchild's parents (Charles and Elizabeth "Lilly" Nelson of Boston), Jewett and Annie Fields.  The Brookline Historial (Massachusetts) Society provides this suggestive sketch of Fairchild:

     Her father was a wealthy stock broker and banker and her parents were frequent hosts of prominent artists and writers. She never married and often lived with her younger brother, Gordon: at St Paul’s School where he ran the Upper School; in the Philippines; in Japan; and, when he returned to Boston around 1930, at his house at 391 Beacon St., Boston. After he died at sea in 1932 she moved to 241 Beacon St.
    She made quite an impression on some very famous people of that era. There are descriptions of her by George Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell, George Santayana, the Fabian leader Beatrice Webb, and the Shakespearean actress Ellen Terry. Shaw took several photographs of her and corresponded with her for many years. She also gave a young Ethel Barrymore a letter of introduction to Shaw. Here is a description from Gertrude Kittredge Eaton, in her Reminiscences Of St. Paul's School: "Mrs. Fairchild had at one time what might be called a salon, in Boston. She knew all the interesting people of the day. She was one of the first to appreciate Walt Whitman. John Singer Sargent was a great friend, and painted many pictures of Sally, who had lovely red hair. Red hair fascinated Sargent. She was an early admirer of Robert Louis Stevenson. When her husband went abroad one year, she told him to look up young Stevenson and have Sargent paint his portrait, which he did. Stevenson stayed with the Fairchilds in Boston, and Gordon remembered sitting on the foot of his bed while Stevenson told him stories. There are many letters to the Fairchilds in the collected letters of Stevenson. "

Sally Norton:  Sara Norton.  See Correspondents.

Margaret:  We have almost no clues in this case.  Jewett knew a number of persons named Margaret, including Margaret Deland (1857-1945), a Boston novelist who began her writing career in the late 1880s.
    Jewett also corresponded with Margaret Thomson Janvier (1844-1913), who "was born in New Orleans. Under the pen name Margaret Vandergrift she wrote many juveniles, among which are: The Absent-Minded Fairy, and Other Verses (1884); The Dead Doll, and Other Verses (1900); Under the Dog-Star (1900); and Umbrellas to Mend (1905)."

Helen Child and her sister:  Almost certainly, here Jewett refers to daughters of Francis James Child, "Harvard’s first professor of English, eminent folklorist, and noted Chaucer scholar..."   The Cambridge Historical Society sketch continues: "In 1860, Child married Elizabeth Ellery Sedgwick (1824-1909), daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Dana Ellery Sedgwick. The couple raised four children, Helen Maria Child (1863-1903), Susan Ridley Sedgwick Child (1866-1946), Henrietta Ellery Child (b. 1867), and Francis Sedgwick Child (1868-1935). Among Child’s close friends were his cousin and classmate Charles Eliot Norton, the poet James Russell Lowell, and the brothers William and Henry James.... The work of scholarship for which Child is best known is his English and Scottish Ballads, in which he included authentic versions of the best-known ballads from these countries. The work appeared in print in eight small volumes between 1857 and 1858, and included multiple versions of 305 ballads. Child provided a full history for each ballad, noting its manuscript source and its appearance in other European countries. His work was so widely accepted as the canon of folk ballads that the ballads are now known as “the Child ballads” and scholars reference them by the number that Child assigned them. "
    One may imagine that Jewett is attempting to find someone to aid a writer friend of Sally Fairchild, named Margaret, with someone Norton knows, and that Norton is suggesting the Child daughters as possibilities.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Frederick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Julia Caroline Dorr

148 Charles street

 Friday morning [late winter, between 1893 and December 1898]

South-Berwek-Maine *

Dear Mrs. Dorr.

I thank you for your most kind letter I am so glad that you are feeling a little better but how good it will be to have the sunshine again!

You are so very kind about the carriage and if you have no other use for it on Monday or Tuesday, and if it should be good weather I should be delighted to go to Elmwood* in the afternoon to see Mabel Burnett* Possibly Mrs Fields can go too.  My long illness earlier in the winter and absence from Town later make me feel as if winter were just beginning -- I have not seen Mabel for a long time. -- There's one comfort, that will be a short winter! -- It is so interesting to know of a possible relationship and I am most eager to welcome the thoughts -- I incline to the belief that you must belong to the Salem Ornes however, and I to their Portsmouth kindred[.] It was my father's mother for whom I was named: she died when he was a baby,* and there is no one left in Portsmouth of the family -- I must show you the silhouette some day and ask you more about such an interesting subject. Mrs. Fields would be sure to send her love -- She went out yesterday morning to stop and ask for you, but the rain forced her to hurry home.

Yours affectionately
Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

between 1893 and December 1898:  Because Mrs. Burnett died in December 1898, this letter must predate that event.  An obituary of Mrs. Burnett indicates that she was an invalid for several years before her death.  The letter seems to imply that one must go to Mrs. Burnett in order to see her.

Maine
:  Jewett frequently used her "South Berwick, Maine" stationery during her visits to other places, crossing out the engraved address.

Elmwood:  The home of James Russell Lowell in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Burnett:  Mabel Lowell Burnett (Sep. 9, 1847 - Dec. 30, 1898), daughter of James Russell Lowell (1819-1891).  See Correspondents.

baby:  Jewett's father, Theodore Herman Jewett was born on 24 March 1815; his mother, Sarah Orne, died on 15 June 1819.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary B. Claflin

148. Charles Street,

Boston.  10 March (Before 1896)*

Dear Mrs. Claflin

Thank you for remembering me, but I am going away for a few days for a change, and I am afraid at any rate I should not be quite equal to the day at Wellesley -- *

Yours affectionately
Sarah O. Jewett.


Notes

Before 1896:  As the note below indicates, Jewett could not have written to Claflin after her death in 1896.

Wellesley: Governor William Claflin (1818-1905) signed the charter for Wellesley College on March 17, 1870, paving the way for the Wellesley Female Seminary to become Wellesley College in 1875.  He and his wife, Mary Bucklin Davenport Claflin (1825 - 1896) remained deeply involved with the college, residing in nearby Newton, MA after his retirement from politics.  Mrs. Claflin made a number of presentations on campus.  For example the The Wellesley Magazine 2:3 (23 December 1893) reported that Jewett was "present at a distance" for a December 11, 1893 reception to honor Mr. and Mrs. Richard Watson Gilder (p. 215).

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Thursday afternoon
[ Before 1896 ]

Dear Mary

                   I have returned from Exeter and had a very pleasant little visit.  Aunty of course feels Mrs. Tarleton's death* very much but she seemed very well and 'took it' with much [ intended more or much more ? ] composure than one could imagine -- but I think the people who make the least cry about such things always feel the worst.  I saw the whole congregation.

 
Notes

Before 1896:  If the letter speaks of Aunt Lucretia Perry, then it must have been composed before her death in 1896.

Aunty ... Mrs. Tarleton's death: Jewett's aunt in Exeter probably is Lucretia Morse Fisk Perry. See Correspondents.  The identity of Mrs. Tarleton is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.
 


SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


  Sunday afternoon

[ Winter 1898 or after ]*

Dear Mary

            …..… Elise* came up and made a nice little call in my room the afternoon and Mrs. Fields* was much pleased to see her too on her way down; she looked so pretty and seemed so bright -- they talked about the house party, etc.  If there is sleighing which this rain doesn't look much like!  -- do let her have Fanny* -- or Theodore* could drive down with the double sleigh and assist.  You must let Joe* drive Fanny when you don't want her to go -- he never came to any grief with Father Gorman's* horses in long winters and if he does whirl corners remember that we have always been liable to do the same!  at any rate I had just as soon let him put Fanny along a road as fast as she can go, and run the risk if there is any, rather than have you get too anxious and careful about her.  So set him off, and if there's any damage I'll pay the bills; it's the only way to make any thing of a man like Joe, to trust him -- and he is very different from the days when he often had something taken, and used to urge the priest's pelters unduly “just like an Irishman”.  --- I've seen him drive, and he does as well as most -- so let him go with her if it isn't very pleasant, or you can drive the other one or anything.  (I hope that good Jane Ann* is well.  I feel condemned for speaking of her as “the other one”.)

 
Notes

1898 or after:  This letter must have been composed after Emily and Elise Tyson purchased Hamilton House in South Berwick.  As Jewett seems to be at Annie Fields's, it is unlikely to come from 1902-3, when Jewett was confined after her September 1902 carriage accident.  That John Tucker, the Jewetts's driver, is not mentioned, suggests a date after his 1902 death.
    The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Elise:  Elizabeth Russell Tyson.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Fanny:  Presumably a Jewett horse.

Theodore:  Theodore Jewett Eastman.   See Correspondents.

Joe:  In a letter of Saturday  [June 17 or 24, 1899] to Annie Adams Fields, Jewett mentions Joe, the gardener, and his "old" Mary.  There it appears they may be employees of Emily Tyson.

Father Gorman:  Father James P. Gorman became pastor at St. Michael's Catholic Church in South Berwick in 1892, after a decade of service at St. John the Baptist Church in Brunswick, ME, where he led in building a new church and in converting the old church into a school.  See Brunswick Churches and Religions, pp. 39-41.  He remained at St. Michael's until 1913.

pelters:  Jewett uses this unfamiliar word in a variety of ways in her letters.  Here she seems to refer to horses.

Jane Ann:  Another Jewett horse. 

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett



  Manchester
Tuesday
[ 1900 or later ]

 
[letter to Mary]

…………….At night -- after an ample supper for a returning traveller Mrs. Fields* sat down to sew and I was reading the French Country House which I had got off the table in Jessie's room* and began to read aloud.  Stubby* had gone out to smoke and presently returned and we got so pleased and laughing over the story that we all continued and read all the evening.  Night before last we were at the Howes and Jessie played after dinner and then poor old George and Alice nearly died laughing over Jess and Stubby in their great cake-walk scene.  I wish you could see them prance and do it in the big hall there, both in their best array.  A. F. urged them up to it -- she'll be going herself soon with Jessie to play the quick-step!  I must stop writing now, for I want to be busy this morning.  Give my love to all  --  especially Herring* and I am sure Stubby sends his.

                                                            Affectionately,
 
                                                                          Sarah

There were those who were caught in the rain down on the beach this morning and had to come galloping home all wet, Mary!

 
Notes

1900 or later:  Jewett's nephew, Theodore, who graduated from Harvard in 1901, is old enough to smoke cigars and to make an entertaining summer guest in Manchester, MA. 
    A transcriber's note with this text reads: [ letter  to Mary ].  The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields,. also A. F. See Correspondents.

the French Country HouseAdelaide Kemble Sartoris (1815 - 1879) was an English opera singer, the younger sister of Fanny Kemble, actress and anti-slavery activist.  She wrote A Week in a French Country House (1867).

Jessie's room: Jessie Cochrane.  See Correspondents.

Stubby:  Theodore Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.

at the Howes .. George and Alice:  Alice Greenwood and George Dudley Howe. See Correspondents.

Herring:  This person has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[Wed. evening 1900 or later]

I should think Susy* would know now.  I had a very pleasant time at Mrs. Tysons.*  Alice Howe was there & Mrs. Pratt & Mrs. John Gray and Mrs. Vaughan Ellen Vaughan again, & Mrs. Pickman “Nelly Mother”.*  I dont think they are coming right away but Mrs. Tyson said Elise* was going to see the Opera though & then take a week in Philadelphia and then “go to Berwick for the rest of her natural Life” she thought.  She said it so funny.  I didn’t see Elise but I think I heard her skip down stairs & away to the Matinees.  I made some calls afterward and only found Mrs. Henry Higginson & Sally Rice and -- who do you think little Mrs. Phipps,* at home!  I have been wishing to get to see her & it is right round the corner from Mrs. Tyson’s.  She is a good nice little woman.  I told her what I thought would interest her about things at the school* -- & especially the Library, but told no tales for she has done what she could, and I dont look to her for more.  She seemed pleased because I came, but I really liked her before when I went.


Notes

1900 or later:  The letter must have been composed after Emily and Elise Tyson began staying regularly at Hamilton House in South Berwick.  The fact that Jewett's list of people she's seen is somewhat disordered, suggests a date after spring 1903, by which she was partially recovered from her debilitating carriage accident of September 1902. Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Wed. evening].

Susy: Usually when Jewett mentions Susy to Mary, she refers to Susan Marcia Oakes Woodbury.  See Correspondents. Whether that is the case this time is not certain.

Mrs. Tysons: Emily Davis Tyson.  See Correspondents.

Alice Howe ... Mrs. Pratt & Mrs. John Gray and Mrs. Vaughan Ellen Vaughan again, & Mrs. Pickman “Nelly Mother”:
    Alice Greenwood (Mrs. George Dudley) Howe. See Correspondents.
    Which Mrs. Pratt is meant is not yet known.  In Correspondents, see Eliza Pratt and Mrs. Ellerton Pratt (with Helen Choate Bell).  Another possibility is Frances Emily Carruth (Mrs. Elliot Willian) Pratt (1845-1929), who was a friend of Anna Mason (Mrs. John) Gray.
   Mrs. John Gray may be Anna Lyman Mason (Mrs. John Chipman) Gray (1853-1932).  John Chipman Gray (1839 -1915) "was an American scholar of property law and professor at Harvard Law School. He also founded the law firm Ropes & Gray, with law partner John Codman Ropes. He was half-brother to U.S. Supreme Court justice Horace Gray."
    Ellen Vaughan is likely to be Ellen Twisleton Parkman (Mrs. William Warren) Vaughan (1853-1924), but this has not yet been confirmed.
    It seems that "Nelly Mother" may refer to Mrs. Pickman, as Ellen Vaughan seems to refer to Mrs. Vaughan.  Among the acquaintances of the above people were Ellen Rodman Motely (1854-1939) and Dudley Leavitt Pickman (1850-1938) of Boston.  Whether this Ellen is the Mrs. Pickman mentioned here is not known.  Her only child was Dudley L. Pickman, Jr. (1885-1964). 

Elise:  Elizabeth Russell Tyson.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents.

Mrs. Henry Higginson & Sally Rice ... Mrs. Phipps:  Mrs. Henry Higginson is Ida Agassiz Higginson.  See Correspondents.
    Sally Rice has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.    Jewett praises Mrs. Phipps for her beneficence to the Berwick Academy in an early draft of her essay, "The Old Town of Berwick."  In the final published draft of July 1894, Jewett apparently praises her husband instead, "the late A. Phipps, Esq., of Boston."  John Alfred Phipps (1832-1892) was a benefactor of the Berwick academy through his estate.  His wife was Mary J. H. Phipps, and she would have made part of his estate available to the academy.  It appears Phipps married Mary Jacobs (Abbott?) (b. 29 December, 1832).  More information is welcome. 

things at the school:  The Berwick Academy in South Berwick. 

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Saturday morning
[Spring after 1900 ]

Dear Mary

            I send you the materials for Miss Chases behoff* -- and I hope you will like them.  I am going to have her make me an India silk skirt which can be worn to mill and to meeting as Jennie S. says.  I wonder if Miss E. Warren could do it -- but how nice if she could come & sew (on waists & things).  If you havent done or seen, about her perhaps you could have her week after next.  I am setting upon the 10th to go home or 11th as near as I can tell.  You can take this bundle for an Easter present!*  I feel like Grandpa who had begun too late to hear of keeping Christmas in Massachusetts.*  I think I began too late about Easter the only times I have much deep association with are those young days when Georgie & I used to go to Trinity.*  I meant to write her a letter to get tomorrow, but I must now write it tomorrow.  I am still hoping that you may fetch a compass & come up.  --  --  --  --  --  --


Notes

after 1890s:  This speculative date is based upon the fact that Jewett writes about hiring seamstress work, but does not mention Olive Grant, who was the main family seamstress until her death in 1901.
    The dashes at the end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

Miss Chases behoff:  It seems possible that Miss Chase is Mary Ellen Chase.  See Correspondents.  The use of the term "behoff" is odd for Jewett.  It is a legal term (more often spelled "behof"), meaning for someone's use or advantage. Perhaps Jewett is suggesting that the materials are simply for Ellen Chase?  However, this context suggests that the Jewetts know another Miss Chase who is a seamstress.  Assistance is welcome.

Jennie S. ... Miss E. Warren: The identities of Jennie S. and E. Warren are not yet known.  It appears that among the employees in Carrie Jewett Eastman's household during the 1890s was a woman named Jennie, who is mentioned in other letters.  However, it seems likely this letter was composed after sister Carrie's death.

Grandpa ... Christmas:  Dr. William Perry (See Correspondents) apparently was among those conservative New Englanders who resisted turning Christmas into a semi-secular holiday.  See the 19th-century history of the holiday in Wikipedia.

Georgie ... Trinity:  Georgina Halliburton and Jewett sometimes attended Trinity Church (Episcopal) together when Jewett was in Boston. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.
 


SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


 [Tuesday Morning]
[ Before 1901]*

 

I have been thinking about your other lace dress, and I think on the whole, that I should get it made.  Mrs. Pierce* told me when I asked her, that such lace was in high style this winter and you might just as well take the climbing wave!  I should bring up the lace any way, but if you do use it be sure to have the dress very light and then you could use it in summer (except the very mid-summer) when you couldn’t use your satin, I should think.  I send you Zip’s note and old Helen’s:*  Both very pleasant.  I shall try to get to old Helen’s tomorrow as she has now set Wednesday for her day.  I grudge these lovely days away when we might be going to places.  I do hope that you and an illustrious not to say welcome guest are making the most of them!  I perfectly ache when I think of not getting up Agamenticus* this year but we may fetch it yet November is the month in which I have fullest confidence.  A.F.’s* cold is almost gone.  She was going to fly all abroad in every direction yesterday, but a young man came to sit with her who is writing a life of Govr Andrew.*  I must now leave you with much love

                                                            Sarah


Notes

Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary]  [Tuesday Morning].

Before 1901:  The letter must have been composed before the death of Anne Longfellow Pierce.

Mrs. Pierce:  Richard Cary says: "Anne Longfellow (1810-1901) mar¬ried George W. Pierce, described by the poet as 'brother-in-law and dearest friend'."

Zip’s note and old Helen's:  Zip is so far unknown.  Assistance is welcome.  Richard Cary identifies "Old Helen" as Helen Bigelow Merriman.  See Correspondents.

Agamenticus: The three hills of Agamenticus rise northeast of South Berwick, between the town and the Atlantic coast.  The highest is Mount Agamenticus, at 692 feet.

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

a young man ... a life of Govr AndrewJohn Albion Andrew, Republican, was governor of Massachusetts during the Civil War, 1861-1866.  The young man probably was Henry Greenleaf Pearson, whose The Life of John A. Andrew appeared in 1904.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett
 
Sunday morning
[1899 -  December 1902]*

Dear Mary

            ………..do have some good rides with John* and get Mrs. Goodwin* some day.  If they have all got whooping cough she will be so glad of the change poor thing!  Such a banging thunder shower waked me up this morning.  I wonder it if was all along shore?  With much love,

                                                             Sarah

 
Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Sunday morning:  That Jewett mentions no other family members suggests that this letter comes from 1899 or later, but this cannot be certain, especially given that we have only this fragment.  John Tucker died in December 1902.

John:  John Tucker.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Goodwin:  Which of several Mrs. Goodwin's of South Berwick is meant here is difficult to determine.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Thursday

[ After 1901 ]

Dear Mary

            ------------------- It was an enchanting day, and so is this.  There were people about the streets again, and I had a visit from two -- One, the wife, had written me before.  I felt her to be a little tiresome and she was!  but the husband was very nice.  They were from Rutgers College in New Jersey but the wife was born in Baltimore was daughter to an Adah Hamilton daughter to Baial and they had kindly wept over the Tory Lover* and came on pilgrimage.  I spoke of Mrs. Jaques* and told them how to get to the view of Hamilton House.*  They were named Prentiss.  The garden was pleasing and Oh what a resource it is!  --------------------------------------------------------

                                                            Sarah

 


Notes

The hyphens at the beginning and end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

daughter to an Adah Hamilton daughter to Baial ... the Tory Lover ... Prentiss:  Jewett's novel appeared in serial in 1900-01 and as a book in 1901.  A main character is Jonathan Hamilton, who was based upon the historical personage who built Hamilton House in South Berwick.  Baial is a common name for men of the Hamilton family, sometimes as a shortened form of Abdiel; therefore, it seems clear that Mrs. Prentiss claims ancestry from Jonathan Hamilton, the character in Jewett's novel and for this reason is particularly interested in the book.
    Robert Wadsworth Prentiss (1857-1913) was professor of mathematics and astronomy in Rutgers College. He married Adah Emery Dodge, daughter of Alanson Hamilton Dodge and Adah Hamilton.  See Class of 1878, Rutgers College, History to 1917, p. 21.

Mrs. Jaques ... Hamilton House:  Mrs. Jaques has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.
    Hamilton House is the 18th-century house built by Jonathan Hamilton in South Berwick.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

 Friday

[August 1903 or later]*

South Berwick, Maine

Dear Mary

            I opened this letter from Uncle Will* thinking that there might be the chance of his coming.  I’ll send him a note -- and then you can write him when you get round to it.  I was so glad to get your letter and M. A.’s* yesterday -- do thank her and say she was so kind to write.  I feel quite rich to share the pleasure of your visit and oh so pleased about Susy’s asking dear Miss Howe!*  So many of her old friends have gone now, that it is lonely [lovely ?] to have younger ones keep her from feeling left out and lonely.  She never was so delightful, either!  Mrs. Lewis came in yesterday for a minute, to speak about her (Mrs. Hill)* saying that she could appoint either the 24th of October or the 31st preferring the latter.  I had been thinking about Mr. Copeland,* and I told Mrs. Lewis that I would, as a FRIEND, make up Mr. Copeland’s sum.  I think it will be as good a thing as the Club can have, and we’ll get Mr. Nye to marshal forth the Academy flock, and sit Blanche Adams in the front row!  The more I think of it the better I feel[.]  BECCA came in at noon for a minute and Mrs. Wentworth* in the evening.  Timmy is well but needs exercise though Katy has taken him as far as the monument* both nights.  I shall try to get out for a little drive this afternoon.  It is Dicky’s turn to the Forge today.  The phaeton was brought yesterday looking very nice and the hay came. Make THE LAKIES* promise to come and see us -- tell dear M. A. that the hollyhocks are beginning (poor John’s* are all in bloom by the stable door) and she can be took to see the country in the trolley car! --- Your letters dont come until the second mail.  Give my love to dear Ellen and Ida* if you see them again.  I hope Ellen isn’t ill again.  She seemed so much better.  With dear love

                                                                                                Sarah

The cup [has] not come yet.

 

Notes

August 1903 or later:  As the notes below indicate, this letter was composed after the opening of the first South Berwick trolley line, and probably fairly soon after the death of John Tucker.  That Hollyhocks are just blooming indicates a late July or early August date.  While there are indications it may have been composed later, I have tentatively chosen the earliest likely year.

Uncle Will: Uncle Will is Dr. William G. Perry (1823-1910), husband of Lucretia Fisk Perry.  See Correspondents.

M. A.'s:  This person is as yet unknown.  It appears that while Mary is staying in Boston, she expects to see a good deal of this person. Assistance is welcome.

Susy’s asking dear Miss Howe: Susy probably is Susan Marcia Oakes Woodbury.  See Correspondents.
    In a letter to Mary Rice Jewett currently dated Late Summer 1900, Jewett mentions that Miss Grace Howe has visited Annie Fields.  It is possible, then, that his is Grace Howe (b. 1879), the daughter of the Philadelphia businessman and physician, Dr. Herbert Marshall Howe (1844-1916) and Mary Wilson Fell (b. 1848), and the grand-daughter of Mark Antony DeWolfe and Elizabeth (Marshall) Howe, his second wife.  Mark Antony DeWolfe Howe (1808-1895) was the first Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Central Pennsylvania.  By his third wife, Eliza Whitney (1826-1909), Howe was the father of Mark Antony DeWolfe Howe (1864-1960), thus half brother of Herbert, who became the editor of Annie Fields's diaries in Memories of a Hostess and who assisted Fields in editing Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett. 

Mrs. Lewis ...  (Mrs. Hill):  For Mrs. Lewis, see George Lewis in Correspondents.  There were Hill families in South Berwick from the 17th century on.  The identity of this Mrs. Hill is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

Mr. Copeland ... the Club: Jewett and her sister, Mary, were active members of the South Berwick Women's Club by about 1895. Mary Jewett seems to have presented a talk for the club, "Recollections of Whittier," sometime after Sarah's death.  Blanchard reports that Julia Ward Howe made regular appearances to speak at the local women's club (Sarah Orne Jewett pp. 353-4). 
    It appears likely that the club has invited Charles Townsend Copeland (1860-1952), Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard University from 1892 to 1928. Richard Cary says: "While a Boston journalist, he became a regular visitor at 148 Charles Street, eventually introducing Mark A. DeWolfe Howe to Mrs. Fields and Miss Jewett in their "shrine of associations." Copeland admired the simple force of Miss Jewett's work and gave 'A White Heron' high place in his repertoire of public readings."  See also Wikipedia.

Mr. Nye ... the Academy flock ... Blanche Adams:
    Frank Elmer Nye (1866-1937) was for many years Head Master or Principal at the Berwick Academy in South Berwick.  Miss Blanche Adams is mentioned in a Lewiston Evening Journal note for December 27, 1898:  "The ladies of the Free Baptist church held a successful Christmas bazaar in the church vestry Thursday evening.  Miss Blanche Adams entertained the audience with effective dramatic selections."
    This person seems to be "Blanche Hermine Adams," later Mrs. Young of Dover, NH, probably born 22 Oct 1871.  She graduated from the Berwick Academy in 1890.  Confirmation and further information are welcome.

BECCA ... Mrs. Wentworth: Becca is Rebecca Young. See Correspondents.  Wentworth is a common name in South Berwick and the region.  The identity of this Mrs. Wentworth is not yet known.

Timmy ... Katy .. the monument:  Timmy is a Jewett family dog, first mentioned in a letter of 1894 and last mentioned as "old" in 1903.  For Katy Galvin, see Correspondents.
    The Soldier's Monument at the intersection of Portland Street and Agamenticus Road in South Berwick became a landmark upon its erection in 1900.  It stands about a mile northeast of the Jewett property, which also is on Portland Street.

Dicky ... the Forge: Dicky is a Jewett family horse, apparently in need of a shoe.  He is mentioned in another letter currently dated 25 August 1887.

THE LAKIES:  The identities of these persons remains unknown. Assistance is welcome.

poor John's:  John Tucker died in December 1902. See Correspondents.

trolley car:  Trolley service between South Berwick and Portsmouth began in 1903.  Service to Ogunquit, perhaps more valuable for seeing the countryside, began in 1907.

Ellen and Ida:  Ellen Francis Mason and her sister, Ida.  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 [Sunday Morning]
[December 1903 or later ]

                       

I cant remember that you wanted anything at Tanks* -- if you do please speak!  The Kitty just appeared tagging A.F.* up to the library and jumping into her lap after sitting and surveying it, while we were talking.  So we had to talk on and stay as we were! and got some things settled perhaps the kitty thought it was best we should! being very solemn, and wise, but so sleepy!  Mrs. Fields was asking me about going down, and I said that I haven’t got to where I could fix the day -- and she wished you could get your things ready for express or poor Katy* to scatter about town, and then come up here on Saturday and stay over until Christmas morning and so have Christmas here too as you liked it once before.  Then we could have Christmas afternoon and evening at home by ourselves -- and I could stay all my days at home together till I go to Mrs. Cabots.* It seems to me this would be beautiful the more I think of it.  I must get every thing to rights here and sometimes it seems as if it would take all the time, though I have got a good start.  Mrs. Fields is going to Louisa’s* to Christmas Day dinner (I dont know that she will but it is promised!  I think so!)  I was just looking at this letter from the Holton man* which I shall answer like the other -- but I dont mean to get in for a correspondence.  I wonder what became of the other letter over which I toiled.  I remember thinking how little a five cent stamp seemed to carry the letter all that way -- and I am pretty sure that he asked for one of my books and I sent that too.  I should think he would bewilder an honest heathen if he talks at the length he writes, poor man.


Notes

1903 or later:  This is a tentative composition date, pending further information. The letter must have been composed after Katy Galvin joins the Jewett  household in the spring of 1899.  Jewett's reference to "Kitty," a Fields pet, suggests this letter is close in time to other letters mentioning the cat and that clearly were composed after Jewett's 1902 carriage accident.
    Transcriber's notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Sunday Morning].

Tanks: This would appear to be a Boston retail store, but no information about it has yet been located.

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Katy:  Probably Katy Galvin.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Cabots: Susan Burley Cabot. See Correspondents.

Louisa's: Louisa Jane Adams Beal, sister of Annie Adams Fields. See Fields in Correspondents.

the Holton man: As yet no correspondence between Jewett and a person named "Holton" has been located.  Assistance is welcome.  She mentions a "Holton" in The Old Town of Berwick," but this may not be relevant.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to William Dean Howells

South Berwick, Maine,
Tuesday,  August 11th.
[ 1903 or later ]

Dear Mr. Howells

          ------------------------ I wish that I could go down to see you today but alas, I have to "keep inside our own fence" pretty carefully, as they say to small children. 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Yours ever sincerely,
S.  O.  Jewett

 

Notes

The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

1903 or later:  Almost certainly composed after Howells bought his summer home in Kittery Point and after Jewett's 1902 carriage accident.  That Jewett feels more than usually limited in her ability to travel points toward 1903, but still, this could be a later year.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to  Isabella Stewart Gardner


Saturday September 12th  [ 1903 or later ]
South Berwick, Maine

Dearest Mrs. Gardner

    What a kind and dear note you have written me.  I shall never forget it!  Oh, you are quite right:  there was no reason for such a foolish disaster, and no one can make no excuses!

    My sister* and I are so sorry to have been away when you came to Hamilton House.  I must give you my story about the charming old place sometime  --  !*

Sarah  O.  Jewett

 

Notes

Notes with this transcription read: FENWAY  COURT  COLLECTION [Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett to Isabella Stewart Gardner.]

sister: Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Hamilton House ... my story:  Gardner is likely to have visited Hamilton House in South Berwick after the completion of its restoration by Emily Tyson in 1900.  Though Jewett had written a passage on Hamilton House in her sketch, "River Driftwood" (1881), it is more likely that Jewett refers to her 1901 novel, The Tory Lover, for which Hamilton House is a main setting.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Frances Parker Parkman

[ Summer 1904 or later ]

Dearest Frances

            -------------- You cant know what a dark disappointment it has been to give up my visit to you.  I have wished so to be with you and to see the dear place -- all the pointed firs* seem like my own cousins -- beloved cousins:  all cousins are not, and we should have felt nearer each other if we could have been together you and I and the dear trees.  I wish you had said that you and Mrs. Wolcott liked the Way it Came story.* There is a touch of character somewhere about it that brings S. W. back* to me always, the elusiveness -- the self-possession perhaps it is.  Goodbye my very dear friend from your

                                                            S. O. J.

Notes

A transcriber's note reads: [Mrs. Henry Parkman].  The line of hyphens presumably indicate omissions from the manuscript.

1904:  That Jewett mentions "The Way it Came" by Henry James suggests an 1896 composition date, but her seeming reference to the passing of Sarah Wyman Whitman, points toward a date after June of 1904.  I have chosen to place it tentatively in 1904.

pointed firs:  Jewett's short novel, The Country of the Pointed Firs, was published in 1896.

Mrs. Wolcott:  Edith Prescott Wolcott.  See Correspondents.

Way it Came story:  American author Henry James (see Correspondents) published his short story "The Way It Came" in London in May 1896.  It was collected in Embarrassments later that year.

S. W. back:  Sarah Wyman Whitman.  See Correspondents. Whitman died on 25 June 1904.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Sunday night
[ Boston, Winter 1905 - March 1907 ]*


Dear Mary

            ---------- Lucy Lee & Stubby* were here to dinner at two and it was very gay.  The coat appeared, and after he went away I was standing by the window up stairs and supposed he had gone down the hill, and then saw him walking discreetly along on the Common* like a sober young doctor, and I was thinking oh how nice he looked!  With an aunt's full pride, when suddenly he took to his heels with all his might and ran at a good slide he had descried in the distance!  My fond heart slid with him -- he went at it tall hat and all!!   and then walked solemnly on again.  I told Mrs. Cabot* who said 'I can see him too' with such a funny delight, and we thought that youth was not all forgotten.  We should have been together to view him, it was such a pleasing moment to an aunt. ------------            


Notes

The transcriber's lines of hyphens presumably indicate omissions from the manuscript.

March 1907:  The letter probably was composed between June of 1905, when Theodore Jewett Eastman completed his medical degree and March 1907, when Susan Burley Cabot died.

Lucy Lee & Stubby:  The identity of Lucy Lee remains unknown.  Assistance is welcome.  Stubby is Jewett's nickname for her nephew, Theodore Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.

the Common: The Boston Common, a large public space near Beacon Hill in Boston.

Mrs. Cabot:  Susan Burley Cabot.  See Correspondents.  Jewett apparently writes from Cabot's Boston home at 34 Beacon Street.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Letters that could have been composed at almost any time in Jewett's adult life


SOJ to Miss McLaughlin*


With many thanks for your kind note --

Yours sincerely

Sarah O. Jewett

To Miss McLaughlin.


Notes

McLaughlin:  This recipient has not been identified.  Stoddart observes that this is an example of Jewett's response to her public. This note is penned on a heavy 3" by 5" card.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Federick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.





Private [? double underlined]

Will the editor of the Transcript* kindly give this notice a place among literary items? I am anxious to have the delightful little book as widely known as possible. It seems to me really an uncommonly successful thing ~
Sarah O. Jewett

South Berwick Maine
 13 May.

Notes

Original transcriber note: [This letter], although short, gives a glimpse into Jewett's work as a writer and an esteemed member of literary society. While unclear the type of work that she wishes to promote, she clearly encouraged and supported other talented authors of her time.

Transcript:  Almost certainly the Boston Evening Transcript.

The manuscript of this letter is held in the Autograph Collection at the Loyola University (Chicago) Archives and Special Collections, item 1428, and may be viewed at Loyola University Chicago Digital Special Collections.  Original transcription by Sarah Morsheimer.  Slightly revised transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Friday morning

Dear Mary

I have written to Exeter and Concord and now I am so tired that I shall have to cut you off with a shilling.

Notes

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


  Saturday morning

 

……… After today I shall feel in great going order and try to see people and get things done.  Thank you for your letter which I found here yesterday.     With best love,

                                                            Sarah

 

  Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

A transcriber's note reads: [letter to Mary].

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to an unknown recipient

  Monday morning

 

I have just got your nice letter of Saturday and such a nice one from Helen* which was a great pleasure.  The beautiful picture is terrible edifying but if I showed it to John* I know he would say What 'dsh'dror UM* so small for?  I saw UM being cleaned this morning early.  (I happened to get up early) and the Walls dust was spoken of in disconsolate terms but the wind seemed to be blowing Mr. Tuckers sails from a fair quarter.  I have been going through with pleasing housekeeping affairs with Lizy* varied by “MisSarahMist-her Clark” and “MissSarahMist-her Ha-y-e-s”,*  but all is well and I am going to do a little writing now if so be I can find a proper pen.  Your letter sounds like a perfectly delightful time.  In haste

                                                            S.O.J.

 
Notes

Helen:  Jewett may refer to any of several "Helens."  As she is not identified as a relative, the more likely possibilities are Helen Bigelow Merriman and Helen Choate Bell. See Correspondents.

John: John Tucker. See Correspondents.

UM:  Mr. Tucker's dialect sentence remains untranslated, and the cleaning of the UM, therefore, also remains mysterious.   Perhaps he asks "What's this drawing room so small for?"  Assistance is welcome.

Lizy: An Irish Jewett employee.  Further information is welcome.

“MisSarahMist-her Clark” and “MissSarahMist-her Ha-y-e-s”:  Clark and Hayes both were common names in South Berwick during Jewett's life, making it difficult to know which persons pay calls in this letter.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

  Tuesday morning

  South Berwick, Maine

Dear Mary

                  ………Mrs. Bell and Mrs. Pratt* were so dear and we had a most charming little dinner with them all by our selves last night but Mrs. Bell is dreadfully changed  --  so thin and like an old woman though it seemed as if nothing could take away her youth and gayety of heart.  When I think how that young man* had the power to spoil all their peace and life and did it just for the excitement and wrong ambition it does seem hard, but life is meant for discipline and not for pleasure and the best souls must get the same lessons over and over again until they have learned them.

 
Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Mrs. Bell and Mrs. Pratt:  Almost certainly, Jewett writes about Helen Choate Bell and her sister, Miriam Foster (Mrs. Ellerton) Pratt.  See Correspondents.

that young man:  Who the young man is and how he destroyed the women's peace is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Saturday morning
[ Winter ]

Dear Mary
 
There is a great screeching of snow in the street as if a timber pine was going down to the landing!*  I went to Cambridge yesterday in spite of the cold and had a beautiful morning, though I got very cold going through Quincy St. against the wind and waiting by Beck for a car which seemed as if it had gone down in sight of land.

This week has gone by like a slide down hill.  I have been so busy in every way.  Ella Walworth* came and made a long call yesterday after telephoning and I was glad to see her though with a friend like that you seem to being [ intended begin ? ] to talk close together and then imperceptibly get farther and farther away.

 
Notes

to the landing:  Though Jewett writes from Boston, she recalls the sounds of South Berwick, of logs going by sledge down her street toward the river.  See her "Looking Back on Girlhood" (1897).

Ella Walworth: Ella Maria Walworth (Mrs. George Britton) Little. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Carrie Jewett Eastman

Monday morning

Dear Carrie

…………….…You must have known it would be so.  I hope Emerson coped with her case, and I should like to see her and Columbus on the water.  They would both sit aft to be near together and the bow of the boat would be all out of water. I can picture it.

Goodbye with much love from Sarah

 
Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Emerson ... Columbus:  Without more information, identifying this Emerson is impossible.  Jewett was acquainted with Ellen Emerson, daughter of American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson, and also with Sylvia Hathaway Watson Emerson. See Correspondents.  
    Christopher Columbus (1451-1506) was an Italian explorer who opened the Americas to European exploration and colonization.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.
 



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

                                                                                                Thursday night

Dear Mary

                  …………I don't know when I have enjoyed so much of my own company!  but there's nothing like making up one's mind and going right to do a thing when you  know it is best.


Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ perhaps to Mary Rice Jewett

 


I slept until Mary came with my breakfast after a harsh experience of dreaming of my approaching execution and running away (escaping) and hiding with some black people last night, but this dream always used to seem a sign of good fortune.  It hasn't happened before for sometime and seems quite natural.

 
Notes

A transcriber's note with this text reads: [at end of letter to Mary]. However, the report that Mary brought her breakfast suggests that the letter is addressed to someone else.  Of course, she may refer to a different Mary having this recurring dream.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

Friday evening

Dear Mary

            Your sister is going to call you Carrie Hope Goodwin.*  She wouldn’t have thought of it but for having it put into her head.  That dimity waist of mine in the entry closet -- or some where!  is a pretty waist which might be looked at -- of course it is a little past in style now but you might get a notion. . .

 


Notes

Carrie Hope Goodwin:  Jewett's reference is mysterious.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

Wednesday  I haven’t much to add except a letter or two! and the account of a beautiful dream of me and A.F.* going to Cousin Fanny Gilman’s* to tea and finding the tea all on the table and some bread & butter -- and we weren’t feeling able to wait!  So we sat down and poured out beautiful cups and began!  After some delay Cousin Fanny came in and we were all a little disturbed!  I hope that you will smile at this pretty dream.  I must hurry to get off a lot of notes and then go out.  So good bye with love from

                                                                                   

Sarah


Notes

A transcriber's note with this text reads: [to Mary].

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Cousin Fanny Gilman’s: This cousin has not been identified, though she is repeatedly associated in Jewett's letters with Jewett's aunt, Mrs. Helen Williams Gilman.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Friday night

Dear Mary

            I catch up this mice [mite ?] of a piece of paper to tell you that I reached here by half past seven and have had a dinner which has kept us down stairs an unusual time.  Alice Longfellow* has been here for two days and the providence lady who spoke last night at the meeting.  Ellen Crowley was with a very good looking niece* -- stepping to Boston & told me that she was leaving for good!  She mentioned Mrs. Goodwin* to be “a good woman” with great feeling, and said when I said, “Oh you’ll be coming back!” that she hadn’t had a rest for seven years.  Poor old Ellen!  I should think she might be feeling that she had been at work a good while.  I gave them some of the candy.

I shall try & write again tomorrow if I dont have to start out too early.  Didn’t we have a nice time together?

                                                                                                Affectionately

                                                                                                      SOJ


Notes

Alice Longfellow: See Correspondents.

Ellen Crowley ... niece:  These people have not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Mrs. Goodwin:  Probably, but not certainly Sophia Elizabeth Hayes Goodwin. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ probably to Mary Rice Jewett

 

[Prides Crossing]

[Wed. Night]

I am shivering on the brink of making up my mind to go to Boston, but it has been so hot, and every day there seems to be some excuse for staying here.  I must go to 4 Park Street,* that’s all, and it is no special haste except to get it off my mind.


Notes

Handwritten notes with this text read: [Pride's Crossing] [Wed. Night].

4 Park Street:  4 Park Street in Boston was the address of the publisher Houghton, Mifflin and of Atlantic Monthly.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

  Monday morning

Dearest darling


 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  The house is so still and the sun shines in in a lovely way and I wish you were here in the window seat.  My darling, do you know you are always helping me?  and I am yours always

                                                                                                H E [illegible]*


Notes

The line of points indicates this is an incomplete transcription.

H E:  The meaning of these letters is unknown.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

[Tues. Night]

 

I wrote Mrs. Goodwin* today.  What a pity she wasn’t there last night!  I smile like Mr. Street* himself to think of his coming to Sister Street, but I could entertain her much better.  I shall want to speak about the visit when I see you.  As you say, it was much to be preferred to the Dover Minister.*

 Notes

Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Tues. Night].

Mrs. Goodwin: Probably, but not certainly Sophia Elizabeth Hayes Goodwin. See Correspondents.

Mr. Street ... Sister Street ... the Dover Minister: These references remain unresolved.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



 SOJ to an unknown recipient

 

Friday night 

The Doctor wishes me to tell you that A. F. is better to day (though very weak) and is doing as well as we could expect.  I have waited until this last minute so as to tell you exactly.   

                                                            Lovingly yours

                                                                                    S.O.J.


Notes


This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to an unknown recipient

Tuesday

34 Beacon Street*

 

            ----------------------  Wait till I tell you about a piece that came on maked like a pineapple* -- and about other things.  Everybody comes now a days and says things about my stories in a way they never did before -- more serious and not by way of having to say something.  It racks me to think of keeping up to it -- my last little crop was a pretty good one.  -----------

 


Notes

The hyphens at the beginning and end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

34 Beacon Street: The address of Susan Burley Cabot. See Correspondents.

maked like a pineapple:  Even if one speculates that Jewett intended "marked like a pineapple," the sentence remains mysterious.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Mrs. Cabot* sent her love to you.  I desire not to forget it.  I told her about Aunt Susan Jewett's being so put out with Mrs. Sanderson* because "she got down on her knees and prayed for me as if I were a heathen"  --  and it was a great moment.  Also about Sarah Lord's* showing no "sence of propriety" about taking the green moreen petticoat.*  I hope you haven't forgotten those two pleasing episodes?

 

Notes

Handwritten notes with this transcription read: [to Mary]   [Thursday]

Mrs. Cabot: Susan Burley Cabot. See Correspondents.

Aunt Susan Jewett's being so put out with Mrs. Sanderson:  Aunt Susan is probably Susan Jameson Jewett (1857-1954 ) who lived unmarried South Berwick  ME.  Her parents were Elisha Hanson Jewett (1816-1883) and Sarah Orne Jewett (1820-1864).  They were the parents of another Sarah Orne Jewett, who died in infancy.
    Mrs. Sanderson and the incident mentioned have not been identified.  She could be Alice Perkins Sanderson (1864-1919) of Portsmouth, NH, but this speculation is based solely upon her being a local contemporary of the right name.  There were other local women who may be this person, including Abby Joy Sanderson (1833-1888) of South Berwick and Fannnie B. (Mrs. George) Sanderson (c. 1850- 1887) of Kittery Point, ME. Lucy F. Sanderson (1874-1945) of Kennebunk, ME, or Mercy (Mrs. Nelson) Sanderson (1820-1905) of Buxton, ME. Assistance is welcome.

Sarah Lord:  In Sarah Orne Jewett (2002) Paula Blanchard identifies Sarah Lord as a South Berwick neighbor (p. 45).  The number of women named Sarah Lord who lived in or near South Berwick, ME during Jewett's lifetime is intimidating.  Perhaps most likely are Sarah Noble Lord (1804-1897) or her daughter, Sarah M. Lord (1842-1884), both of whom are buried in South Berwick, ME.  Assistance is welcome.

moreen
: a heavy fabric, usually wool or cotton.
This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Undated Fragment

and I wish I had my own dear warm little Fuff* to be  close to and gossip with and tell things to and tease and shake ladies, because she is so dear.  Fuff would say Pin* it is too dark to write any longer.! So good night from your own P. L.


Notes

Fuff:  A nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Pin:  Short for Pinny Lawson, a nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett. See Correspondents.

This text is from the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett to Annie Fields. corr057-soj-af-06.




SOJ to William Hayes Ward


Dear Mr. Ward

    Will you please put this cheque to the account of the sick doctor,* for whom you are doing such a great kindness -- Please credit it on your list to S.J.

    The 'case' appears to me very much since my father was a [physician corrected] -- This happens to be his birthday and

[Page 2]

so I thank you the more for giving me the opportunity.

    Believe me, with great regard

Yours sincerely,

Sarah Orne Jewett

[ Signature is obscured in on-line copy of the ms. ]


sick doctor:  The occasion for this donation has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held in the Abernethy Collection; Special Collections and Archives, Middlebury College Library, Middlebury, Vt. aberms.jewettso.xx2.  It may be viewed here.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Edited by Terry Heller, Coe College.




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