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Sarah Orne Jewett:  Letters from Europe

24 May - 25 October, 1882


 

 These letters begin after Jewett left home in South Berwick, Maine, but before she and Annie Fields departed from New York City.

 



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[ 1882 ]*

 

 [ Begin Letterhead ] THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF BOSTON [ Deleted ]

____

President: Robert Treat Paine, Jr., 16 Pemberton Square.

Secretary: George A. Goddard, 50 Equitable Building.

Treasurer:  Darwin E. Ware, 53 Devonshire Street.

Registrar and Ass't Treasurer:  Zilpha D. Smith.

 

[5 Ave Hotel* handwritten to the right of the above list]

Central Office and Registration,

Room 41, Charity Building.

Boston, [Wednesday handwritten on blank line] 188

[Morning handwritten]

 

[ End letterhead ]

 

 Dear O.P.*

      [My corrected] dress and your letter came all right -- thank you ever so much. We were both awfully tired coming on and were glad to get here and go to bed though that is a splendid train. We have just come down to breakfast and are going to the steamer afterward. It is a lovely bright day and Mrs. Fields* and I  both send love. I have only a stub of a pencil so can’t write much of a note. The leaves are all out here and it is quite summerlike.

     Mrs. Burleigh is at the next table and Sally just came to speak to me. Mr. Rollins is with them. Good bye with lots of love for all --  from the Queen.*

Notes

1882:  This date is added in another hand.  The letter is composed in pencil.  Even though the borrowed letterhead is from Boston, Jewett writes from New York City.

5 Ave Hotel: Wikipedia says: "The Fifth Avenue Hotel was a luxury hotel located at 200 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City from 1859 to 1908. It occupied the full Fifth Avenue frontage between 23rd Street and 24th Street, at the southwest corner of Madison Square."

O.P.:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.
            The circled number 34 in pencil, apparently in another hand, appears at the bottom left of page 1.

Mrs. Burleigh … Sally … Mr. Rollins … the Queen:
    Mrs. Burleigh may be Matilda Burleigh, Mrs. John Holmes Burleigh (1822-1877), a South Berwick neighbor, the widow of a mill owner and Maine congressman.  See Wikipedia. However, references to her in later letters cast doubt upon this possibility.
    Sally may be Sarah Norton, but this is not certain, since the context suggests she is with Mrs. Burleigh. See Correspondents.
    Mr. Rollins also is likely a South Berwick neighbor, a member of the prominent Rollins family.  A short walk from her house took her to Rollinsford, NH, named for the family.  Jewett was acquainted with Mrs. Ellen Augusta Lord Rollins (1835-1922) who lived near her South Berwick home.  However, Jewett's letter from the Scythia, below, suggests that she was not acquainted with this Mr. Rollins before this voyage.
    The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.

 



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

Scythia,* N.Y. Harbor

[1882 added in pencil]

Dear Mar!

     This is for a last note -- you won’t get any later particulars until I get across. Mr. Rollins* is very nice tell Uncle Wm and Mr. Kidder of Kidder, Peabody & Co* is going

[ Page 2 ]

too and he is a great friend of Mrs. Fields* so we should be looked after all right. Love to everybody at our house & Caddie & to John & Ann* -- The steamer is splendid and I only [2 circled above only] hope it will be as nice

[ Page 3 ]

as this all the way! We have got to house keeping in our stateroom. They said the Bothnia* had a very smooth passage & she got in only yesterday -- Good by dear Mar. Thank you and Mary* so much for the [prisent so spelled]. It was nice

[ Page 4 ]

of Jim and Sadie* to come and Bill Flagg & his daughter.* Mr. Alden of Harper’s* came to see us off --  yours always lovingly,

                                    Sarah

Mrs. Fields sends love --

 

Notes

Scythia:  The S. S. Scythia, sister ship to the Bothnia (see below), a Cunard Line passenger ship, went into service in 1874.  Until 1884, the ship carried passengers between New York City and Liverpool, then changed its route to Boston and Liverpool. 

Uncle Wm:  William Durham Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mr. Rollins ... Mr. Kidder of Kidder, Peabody & Co:  Mr. Rollins also is likely a South Berwick neighbor, a member of the prominent Rollins family, but seems not to be among Jewett's familiar acquaintance. 
    Wikipedia says: "Kidder, Peabody & Co. was an American securities firm, established in Massachusetts in 1865. Its operations included investment banking, brokerage, and trading." 
    Wikipedia also says: "Henry Purkitt Kidder (1823 - 1886) was an American bank founder born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His parents were Thomas Kidder, a Boston civil servant in charge of meat and fish inspection, and Clarissa Purkitt. Henry Kidder was the founder of investment bank Kidder Peabody and served on several charitable boards."

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Caddie & to John & Ann:  Carrie (sometimes called Caddie) Jewett Eastman and John Tucker.  See Correspondents. Ann was a Jewett family employee.

Bothnia:  According to Wikipedia, the "SS Bothnia was a British steam passenger ship that sailed on the trans-Atlantic route between Liverpool and New York City or Boston. The ship was built by J & G Thomson of Clydebank, and launched on 4 March 1874 for the British & North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, which became the Cunard Line in 1879."

Mary:The identity of this Mary is uncertain.

Jim and Sadie: The identity of this couple is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Bill Flagg & his daughter: These persons remain unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Mr. Alden of Harper’s:  Henry Mills Alden. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.


 

SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Imperial Hotel – Cork*

3rd June  [ -- 1882 added in pencil]

 

Dear  O. P.* I think I never felt happier in my life than when I was fairly at home and indeed when I came on deck that morning (awfully early you may be sure!) and saw the land and the green fields and the trees! We got off the Scythia* about half past eight or nine and came up Queenstown Harbour* on the tug and landed about eleven. No trouble getting through the custom house and then we started for ‘Corruk’ by rail and Mrs. Fields* and I laughed like two children all the way we were so delighted

[ Page 2 ]

 with everything. Having left such early Spring behind you can imagine the pleasure of getting into the middle of Summer the fields greener than you ever dreamed of greenness and the buttercups, and daisies & new kinds of flowers, beside all in bloom The trees are beautifully thick-leaved and the park and "gentlemen's pla_ces" were splendid to look at. I wanted to lie down and roll in the grass. Mrs. Fields picked me a dandelion at Queenstown and I never enjoyed a flower more. Anything funnier than the people and the beggars and the houses

 [ Page 3 ]

you never saw. We were in such gales of laughter over everything. The nice cabins and the pigs and the flock of sheep in the fields and the donkey carts and the old women with [ cap borders ? ] and the blessings that were showered on us were all such fun. You wait until you have been sleeping in a state room ten nights! We meant to go to Killarney for Sunday but the train by the pleasantest route had already gone and I said at once we had better stay here and go on

 [ Page 4 ]

 Monday morning. So we shall get rested you know and start fair and we have quite time enough. Tomorrow we mean to drive out to see Blarney Castle* and the bells of Shandon* and the Country about Cork. Beside Cork itself is very quaint and interesting. How I wish I could show you the people I saw just driving up from the station, but it is no use telling. I have read and read about them but I had to see them -- In the cars there were some nice looking people who were chattering

 [ Page 5 ]

all the way so we have seen all kinds of life. I believe  I thought I should eat all I could see at lunch time! It was in the coffee room and there was cold beef, the most delicious you ever saw and other cold meats, and salad and oh such bread and butter!! and I wound up with some cheese and crackers -- and the cheese was so good! I am going to have some milk as soon as I can --  it must be surprising milk that makes such cheese and butter. You see we got

 [ Page 6 ]

so tired of the things on the steamers --  they tasted as if they had been kept in bureau drawers, the last two or three days. I hope you have got my telegram by this time and know we are all right. I got on very well with the new fashions of travelling and though it gives more trouble than our way, still I shall soon get used to it. You dont have checks, but must go and pick out your

 [ Page 7 ]

trunks and give orders about them, when they go into the car and come out! Only eight people can sit in a car, but they are very comfortable. you get in on the side. I shall want to be writing you all the time, but I am going so send two letters a week. Tell Taddy* I thought of her when I saw the daisies staring at me! I didn’t know they had daisies here. Ask Ann*

 [ Page 8 ]

 what the bushes are that grow all on the hills, covered with bright yellow flowers. It is furze or gorse  I don’t know which, but it is so pretty. I have seen the old fellows just like David*  by the dozen, and I have seen donkeys that would make John* choke himself laughing --  about as big as dogs in large ramshackle carts. Goodbye for this time with love to all. I wish you would send this to Cora* when you have read it for I am too tired to write

 [ Up the left margin of page 5 ]

 any more.  Tell Ann Ireland is splendid.

  

Notes

Imperial Hotel, Cork:  The Imperial has been a major hotel in Cork, Ireland since 1813.

O.P.:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Scythia:  The S. S. Scythia, sister ship to the Bothnia (see below), a Cunard Line passenger ship, went into service in 1874.  Until 1884, the ship carried passengers between New York City and Liverpool, then changed its route to Boston and Liverpool. 

Queenstown Harbour:  Queenstown is now named Cobh, and is a major tourist seaport town in County Cork, Ireland.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Blarney Castle: Wikipedia says:"Blarney Castle ... is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland, and the River Martin. Though earlier fortifications were built on the same spot, the current keep was built by the MacCarthy of Muskerry dynasty, a cadet branch of the Kings of Desmond, and dates from 1446. The Blarney Stone is among the machicolations of the castle."

bells of Shandon: Wikipedia says: "Shandon (Irish: An Seandún meaning "the old fort") is a district in Cork city noted for The Bells of Shandon, a song celebrating the bells of the Church of St Anne written by Francis Sylvester Mahony under the pen name of 'Father Prout'."

Taddy:   Other letters indicate that Taddy is female, but no other information about her is yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

Ann:  Ann was a Jewett family employee.

old fellows just like David:  The identity of David is not known.  Assistance is welcome.

John:  John Tucker.  See Correspondents.

Cora: Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

                                                                                                 Enniskillen*

                                                                                                  8th June 1882                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

Dear O.P.*

      I have been telling Mrs. Fields* that it seemed as if I wrote very seldom! but the truth is, instead of its being four or five days since we landed I keep thinking it is four or five weeks --  it is all so new and strange and we have seen so much. I posted my last letter at Glengarriff* day before yesterday morning. And we left there at half past nine, hoping with [all all written twice] our hearts we may see the Eccles Hotel* again, for a more lovely place isn’t in the world!

 [ Page 2  ]

We happened to wake up very early, so we went up the hill again among the cabins and met old Mrs. Casey* with whom we had made friends the night before. She was so much like old Mrs. Drinan* and we gossipped with her awhile and picked some roses out of the hedges and some daisies and then came down again. Mrs. Fields gave her some money and the good little old soul fell on her knees among the daisies to give us a blessing and wish us a safe return. She was so old-fashioned and solemn and funny about it, and we watched her go off among the furze

[ Page 3 ]

driving a calf to pasture and I suppose she would stop at the first best bit of green grass and knit and keep company with the calf. We were dying to see the inside of her cabin but she was already beyond it when we saw her. We got good looks into some of them and I can tell you they aren’t crowded with furniture, but they are as pretty to look at and picturesque as some kind of a bird’s nest always provided you aren’t too near! They are apt to have mud puddles in front at least where ducks and geese enjoy themselves. And when you only see the thatched roofs and white washed walls among the trees the effect is charming --

  [ Page 4 ]

We were driving most of the day we left Glengarriff through a wonderfully beautiful country, first among farms and then up over the mountains of Killarney.* In the highest part of the hills, just before we began to descend into the Killarney Valley the view was wilder and finer than any mountain view I had ever seen. The roads are the best I ever saw, perfectly smooth and hard and the bridges are all of stone with lovely arches. I counted forty brooks and small streams within not a very great distance. When we were near Killarney we go into a lovely fertile region again and the ivy and honeysuckle were

 [ Page 5 ]

2

tangled over everything. I do wish mother could see all the honeysuckle growing wild, and just now it is coming into full bloom. Killarney is beautiful of course and the Royal Victoria Hotel* was very pleasant near the shore of the prettiest lake, and kept as beautifully is its park and flower gardens as if it were some private residence. We came the last of the forty miles on a jaunting car which I like better and better to ride on. Next day (yesterday) we came to Dublin and it is altogether the handsomest and most interesting city

 [ Page 6 ]

I ever saw The public buildings, the custom house, Trinity College [two deleted words] are finely carved and decorated. And the river goes right through the heart of the town crossed every little way by handsome great-arched bridges. We took a little stroll I in in the evening up and down one or two streets, and though St. Stephen’s Green, a small park on which the hotel fronts. We had a dinner of nine courses at the Shelbourne* and it was so good we are glad to be going back there for Monday night. We came

 [ Page 7 ]

by Phoenix Park where the murder was.* Every body is still excited over it, but we were told that the murderer will never be found, for the secret society could put the informer to death in a jiffy. All round the city we saw the placard "Ten thousand pounds reward."

            The country was all very interesting coming from Killarney. We saw some great ruined castles and abbeys and I hardly know what to tell you about first -- everything interests me so much and I learn so much every day. The peat bogs and the cabins and the bridges

 [ Page 8 ]

the railway-stations and every thing about the trains, and all the towns and people keep me staring and thinking every minute. I get into such frolics over the donkeys and the rooks! These solemn birds are so much funnier than our crows, for they are a good deal shorter and stouter and seem to make a great piece of work about flying as if they were nice old black silk pincushions trying to waggle up into the air!!

     Today we came across country again to the northward and were so much

 [ Page 9 ]

 3

interested in three young Irish ladies who were in the same carriage (or car). They seemed to like so much to talk with us and one of them was so much like Clara Potter of New York.* They lived way out in the country beyond here and I wish we had a chance to see them again. They went off with a man in livery. Two of them were Dublin girls and the other was their cousin & they were going to make her a long visit. They seemed so troubled about the state of things,* and so anxious, and said all these commotions made them such worry and discomfort,

[ Page 10 ]

for lots of people have nearly all their incomes cut off, even after they do the best they can for their tenants. Many of them are shiftless and dont like new cabins so well at the old ramshackle ones, and these wild rascals are stirring up the tenants all the time and nobody knows what the end will be. There are four regiments of soldiers now in Dublin barracks, ready to come out at a minute’s warning to put down the mob that may appear any day. Yet everything on the surface is quiet and it is hard to realize, going

 [ Page 11 ]

about as we all do, what a volcano is ready to break out. Of course, as in all such questions there is wrong on both sides, but the Irish mob is a crazy headed one, we all know that!

      Enniskillen is a charming old place at the head of a long, narrow pair of lakes (lower and upper Lough [deleted word] Erne). The town is on an island, and late in the afternoon we took a boat and were rowed about two miles to see some curious old ruins, one of the famous Irish round towers which nobody

 [ Page 12 ]

has ever found out the history of. Nobody knows when they were built or why. Coming back we came around the barracks and [deleted words] just on the river side a fragment of an old castle make parts of the building. It was so lovely, with the old gray crumbling stone battlements and an English soldier in his bright red coat leaning over the tower wall. Liza* has gone out into the country to find her friends. She charted a ‘car’ and went off beaming with delight -- We shall be here until day after tomorrow

 [ Up the left margin of page 9 ]

  and then go up to Giants Causeway* for Sunday.

[ Up the left margin and down from the left across the top margin of page 1 ]

Love to all and please send this to Cora* after you have read it. Mrs. Fields sends love. Tell Ann tomorrow I am going to ride a donkey! And I think it will be better than a "jaunting" car. Love to all, from Sarah

 

Notes 

Enniskillen ... Glengarriff ... the Eccles Hotel:  Enniskillen now is in Northern Ireland, Glengarriff, the location of the historic Eccles Hotel, is in County Cork in Ireland.

O.P .: A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

old Mrs. Casey … old Mrs. Drinan:  The identities of these two women are as yet unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Royal Victoria Hotel: From about 1835 into the 20th Century, the Royal Victoria in Killarney was one of the grand hotels of Ireland.


Trinity College ... the ShelbourneWikipedia says: "Trinity College ... is the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin, a research university in Ireland. The college was founded in 1592 as the "mother" of a new university,[Note 1] modelled after the collegiate universities of Oxford and of Cambridge, but, unlike these, only one college was ever established; as such, the designations 'Trinity College' and 'University of Dublin' are usually synonymous for practical purposes. It is one of the seven ancient universities of Britain and Ireland,[7] as well as Ireland's oldest university."
Wikipedia also says: "he Shelbourne Hotel was founded in 1824 by Martin Burke, a native of Tipperary, when he acquired three adjoining townhouses overlooking Dublin's St Stephen's Green - Europe's largest garden square. Burke named his grand new hotel The Shelbourne, after William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne." 

Phoenix Park where the murder wasWikipedia says: "The Phoenix Park Murders were the fatal stabbings on 6 May 1882 in the Phoenix Park in Dublin of Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Henry Burke. Cavendish was the newly appointed Chief Secretary for Ireland, and Burke was the Permanent Undersecretary, the most senior Irish civil servant. The assassination was carried out by members of the 'Irish National Invincibles'."

Clara Potter of New York: It seems likely Jewett refers to the painter  Clara Sidney Potter Davidge (1858-1921), the daughter of Episcopal Bishop of New York, Henry Codman Potter.  Late in her life, she married the painter Henry Fitch Taylor (1853-1925). 

troubled about the state of things: Presumably they refer to the fears associated with the recent murders and with

Liza:  Personal servant of Annie Fields, who accompanied the pair on this trip.

Giants CausewayWikipedia says: "The Giant's Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption ... It is located in County Antrim on the northeast coast of Northern Ireland, about three miles (4.8 km) northeast of the town of Bushmills."

Cora: Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.

 



SOJ to William Perry

Dublin
     June 12, [1882]

    Dear Grandpa:

     This is only a note to tell you how well we are getting on and what a good time I am having. It is worth crossing the sea if it were twice as wide, just to have had these ten days in Ireland, and Mrs. Fields* and I have enjoyed every day and only wish we could stay longer.
     I was so much interested in seeing more of Dublin today than we had time for when we were here last week, and it certainly is a beautiful old city. The colleges and hospitals arc splendid buildings. I think a doctor would be very proud of them. We went to St. Patrick's Cathedral to see Dean Swift's monument* and found so many others that we were interested in. It was my first sight of an old cathedral. In the time we have been ashore we have been at Cork, Glengariff, Killarney, Enniskillen, Portrush, and the Giants Causeway,* and a night in Belfast beside two nights here. Tomorrow we go to London where I am hoping to have a very good time indeed. But I can't have the delight and strangeness of this week but once.
     I write long letters home and after I get settled down a little I hope to write to my other friends, but of course a good deal had to be crowded into this week, and I have been too tired to touch a pen at night. I am learning so much every day, and I am so glad I am here. It is late and I will send you more love than letter, and say good night, and promise to do better next time.
     Love to Uncle Will and Aunty and Fanny* and much for yourself from

     Sarah

     Tell Elizabeth1 I liked Enniskillen very much. It is really a most beautiful place.2


Notes by Richard Cary

     1 Elizabeth Watkin was Dr. Perry's cook, one of a long succession of native Irish housemaids who served in the Perry and Jewett homes.
     2 On this first of four European tours, each taken in company with Mrs. Fields, Miss Jewett touched on England, Norway, Belgium, Italy, France, and Switzerland, besides Ireland. Of the people she met, she spoke most enthusiastically of Tennyson, Charles Reade, Anne Thackeray Ritchie, and Charles Dickens' family, with whom she had dinner.
     For other trips see Letters 60, note 2; 94, note 4; 112, note 1.

Additional notes

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Dean Swift's monumentWikipedia says: "Jonathan Swift (1667 - 1745) was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin ....  Swift is remembered for works such as A Tale of a Tub (1704), An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity (1712), Gulliver's Travels (1726), and A Modest Proposal (1729)."
    Among the artifacts associated with Swift in St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin is a monument bust of Dean Swift.

Giants CausewayWikipedia says: "The Giant's Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption ... It is located in County Antrim on the northeast coast of Northern Ireland, about three miles (4.8 km) northeast of the town of Bushmills."

Uncle Will and Aunty and Fanny:  In her maternal grandfather's family, Uncle Will would be Dr. William G. Perry (1823-1910) and his wife Lucretia Fisk Perry (1826-1896); their daughter was Frances Perry (1861-1953).

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Additional notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.

 


 
SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

326 Regent St. London!*

Thursday 15 June

[1882 added in pencil]

Dear O. P.*

             Sister is no sense at all she is having that beautiful of a time. Tuesday we came across from Dublin travelling all day from seven in the morning until six at night. All the morning we were crossing from Kingstown to Holyhead in Wales, and any hopes Mother may have had blighted in regard to my being seasick coming from Ameriky were gratified, for sister expects to be in the better for that v'yge for the rest of the summer, and was very low in her mind. Perhaps she had too good a

[ Page 2 ]

time in ould Ireland. It was a very rainy day, a steady down pour, and Wales looked so prim and gray and different, that is, what I could see of it, for the mist was very thick. By the time we got to Chester and as far away as Rugby it was lighter and though it rained, still we could see the country very well and it was most beautiful. When we reached Brown’s Hotel* we found that they had not kept our room after the eighth though we told them to [deleted word] and we were disappointed

 [ Page 3 ]

  at first, but we came over to Regent St. and are delightfully settled in much pleasanter rooms than the others. We would not take keep the ones they had for us instead of ours at Brown’s -- You don’t know how lovely it is here! I really shall hate to go away which I suppose we shall do next week. We have a nice bedroom and a parlour where there is a square table for our dinners, and we have all our meals by our

 [ Page 4 ]

selves, served beautifully -- Every morning I make out our bill of fare for the day, and somethings we get ourselves when we are out. To-day we went right after breakfast to Covent Garden Market* and it is the most fascinating place you ever saw. Perfect crowds of flowers and the most magnificent flo fruit. Mrs. Fields* bought such a lot of flowers, some she sent to Mrs. Lowell* who is very sick again, and we put a great

[ Page 5 ]

many in the room here and some we took to Westminster Abbey this afternoon to put on Dickens’s tomb.* I didn’t know what to say when I found myself in that place, and I really had to come away after I had only seen a small part of it. The roof is so high and it seems as if you could look a mile down through the arches -- and the great stained glass windows and the carvings and the great bells ringing over head are all so

 [ Page 6 ]

wonderful and beautiful that it fairly upsets you. Just within a dozen or two feet from Dickens’s tomb are Chaucer’s and Thackeray's and Sheridan’s and Milton’s and Goldsmith’s.* Oh I can’t begin to tell you about it. It made all the great men so much more real somehow, and it was so familiar because I had read about it and longed to see it over and over again ever since I was a little girl.

[ Page 7 ]

  We shall go again several times.

             The streets all seem so familiar too --  Piccadilly and Pall Mall and Hanover Square and all of them. I feel as if I were somebody in an English novel! ----  Yesterday we drove about a little and went into some shops. They were very fascinating, but one needs a mint of money to live in London. Mrs. Fields says London itself is more fascinating than any thing in it! To-night Susy Travers* dined with us

 [ Page 8 ]

and we went afterward to a lovely concert and saw such interesting people. We are going often if we don’t get too tired in the day times for there is a great deal of fine music just now --

 

            Tomorrow morning we go to the Royal Academy* to see pictures and afterward to the Grosvenor Gallery* if we can to look at one or two we wish to see there particularly. Several people have been to see Mrs. Fields and she seems very well and bright though I know

 [ Page 9 ]

in one way it makes her very sad to be here. Lowell was here to-day but I didn’t see him as he is in great trouble about his wife. [deleted words] – I wish you could see the flowers and fruit we got today. Apricots and plums and strawberries and cherries -- and we had early gooseberry and plum tart that we bought at a cake shop. Oh Purssell’s is nothing to the London cake shops! Sister is distracted with London! Mrs. Fields is lovely and I grow fonder of

[ Page 10 ]

her every day. She is always thinking about what I must do, and nobody could be more thoughtful and kind. Liza has every kind of skipping about -- and is so funny, and keeps everything in such nice train for us. I must say goodnight for it is so late. I wish you could see the great splendid place. Yesterday I saw Hyde Park* and today I went down to the city to Barings* to draw money & saw St. Paul’s* & no end of other things. I get tired to death driving

[ Page 11 ]

down the streets there is such a world of things to see. We shall be here ten days & go away to Devonshire for ten and then come back again. I have such nice letters from you & Cora* besides Mother & Carrie’s* & lots of others. I shall not try to write so much except home & to Cora. Two or three letters are all most people can have from dear sister because she gets tired and wants to go to bed instead of writing. Mrs. Fields sends love to you and so do I -- Yours always

Sarah --

 

Notes

326 Regent St. London: Which hotel was located at 326 Regent St. in 1882 has not been discovered.  Assistance is welcome.

O.P .:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Brown's hotel: Wikipedia says:  "Brown's Hotel ... in London, established in 1837 and owned by Rocco Forte Hotels since 3 July 2003."

Covent Garden Market: A partially covered general market in the Covent Garden district at east the side of London's West End.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Lowell:  The American poet and editor, James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), was American minister to England 1880-1885.  He and his second wife, Frances Dunlap (d. February 1885), were close friends of Annie Fields and of Jewett.

Westminster Abbey … Dickens’s tomb … Chaucer’s and Thackeray's and Sheridan’s and Milton’s and Goldsmith’s:
Wikipedia says: "Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs."
    Wikipedia also says: "Poets' Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey because of the high number of poets, playwrights, and writers buried and commemorated there."

    The British novelist, Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870) was a much beloved friend of Annie Fields.
    Geoffrey Chaucer (1343 - 1400),  author of The Canterbury Tales, was the first poet to be buried in Westminster.
    William Makepeace Thackeray (1811 - 1863) was a novelist, the author of Vanity Fair.
    Richard Brinsley Butler Sheridan (1751 - 1816)  Wikipedia says, was a British satirist; a playwright and poet, and long-term owner of the London Theatre Royal, Drury Lane."  Among his best-known plays are The Rivals and The School for Scandal.
    John Milton (1608 - 1674) was the author of Paradise Lost.
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728 - 1774), according to Wikipedia, was an Irish novelist, playwright and poet, who is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770), and his plays The Good-Natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773)."


Susy Travers:  Susan Travers of Newport, RI (d. 1904) was the daughter of William R. Travers.  Her sister, Matilda, married the artist, Walter Gay.  Though a biographical sketch is difficult to locate, Internet searches indicate that she was an art collector and a patron of the Boston Museum of Art, the New York Botanical Garden, and various philanthropic organizations. 

Royal Academy: Wikipedia says: "The Royal Academy of Arts (RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly in London. It has a unique position as an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects; its purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and appreciation of the visual arts through exhibitions, education and debate."

Grosvenor Gallery: Wikipedia says: "The Grosvenor Gallery was an art gallery in London founded in 1877 by Sir Coutts Lindsay and his wife Blanche. Its first directors were J. Comyns Carr and Charles Hallé. The gallery proved crucial to the Aesthetic Movement because it provided a home for those artists whose approaches the more classical and conservative Royal Academy did not welcome, such as Edward Burne-Jones and Walter Crane."

Purssells: The Purssell family established popular bakery shops in London and after 1859 in New York City.

Hyde ParkWikipedia says: "Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in London and one of its Royal Parks." The park includes extensive gardens and various monuments.

Barings to draw money: Wikipedia says: "Barings Bank was a British merchant bank based in London, and the world's second oldest merchant bank (after Berenberg Bank). It was founded in 1762 and was owned by the German-originated Baring family of merchants and bankers."
    "The bank collapsed in 1995 after suffering losses of £827 million ($1.3 billion) resulting from poor speculative investments, primarily in futures contracts, conducted by an employee named Nick Leeson working at its office in Singapore."

St. Paul’sWikipedia says: "St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London."

Cora: Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

Carrie’s:  Caroline Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.

 



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

London 16 June 1882

 

Dear O. P.*

     Sister having forgotten to mention that she had privileges of seeing the Prince of Wales* at the concert last night is obliged to begin another letter. There were four or five others of the Royal Family and when they came in she stood up politely with the rest of the company, but could get no good sight at them, though she knew the Prince of Wales from his pictures. It was a lovely concert.*

[ Page 2 ]

I wrote you so late last night that I was tired and forgot about everything I meant to say. Just after breakfast this morning who should come to call but Mrs. Craik (Miss Muloch you know) and when we come back from Devonshire we have promised to go to lunch with her. She lives just out of London and it will be so nice. It was nice of her to come right in to see us. Mr. Craik who was with her and who was very pleasant, stayed with Mrs. Fields* at Manchester

 [ Page 3 ]

  once. He was with Black.* "Miss Muloch" is much older than I supposed and she has such a sweet face. I was very glad to see her. How many books do you think she has written? Forty and she says she is going to stop now! and John Halifax* was n't the first by any means and that must have been published more than twenty years ago, a good deal. We have been so lucky in having good weather in London. One doesn’t mind the little showers and the sun is out most of the day. Sister

 [ Page 4 ]

has had the side cars superseded in her affections by the Hansom cabs which are truly lovely. We have nice open fires (at one and sixpence) and sister is that contented she is ashamed of herself -- and tuppence will buy her raspberry tarts that make her forget all troubles of mind and body and tomorrow is market day again at Covent Garden.* To-day she is going everywhere! The only misery being there is so much to do and see [deleted word] and I can only be

[ Page 5 ]

in one place at a time.

  = Sunday -- After I finished those remarks I went to the Royal Academy* to see the pictures and spent a delightful morning. The pictures were very fine and it is great fun to see the people. After lunch we stayed in until six and then went to Tavistock Square to call on the Bennochs,* some old friends of Mrs. Fields’s,* and afterward we drove down to the Temple Church* -- and had a beautiful walk through the cloisters and ^by^ the temple gardens. It was where Charles Lamb and Dr. Johnson lived, and Goldsmith

 [ Page 6 ]

in different ‘courts’ of the Temple,* and I was so glad to see the old houses where so many interesting things have happened. It is a lovely place there too. You go in through a narrow court and suddenly come out into an open space with this beautiful old church and the little park and the old houses crowded together around. All the houses are filled with lawyers offices, it is where a great many young men read law --  [ two deleted words ] It was so nice to be there late as we were when everything is quiet. Yesterday we went down to Covent Garden again

 [ Page 7 ]

and then to Macmillans the publisher’s,* and then to get tickets to see Irving and Ellen Terry the great actors in Romeo & Juliet on Wednesday night.* Did I tell you you have to go to the concerts & theatres here in evening dress as if it were a party? Without a bonnet for they won’t let you in with one on! It makes very fine audiences -- it really was splendid to see the people the other night. Yesterday afternoon we drove down the Thames Embankment to Chelsea to see Mrs. Merritt* and

 [ Page 8 ]

had such a good time. It was the Queen’s Drawing Room, and the Prince of Wales* received and all the gentlemen were going in full uniform and the streets were full of carriages. We [came corrected] ] by Hyde Park* as we came back and you never saw anything so beautiful as the horses and carriages not to speak of the coachmen & foot men in liveries more lovely to behold. Sister had privileges of seeing the Lord Mayor’s carriage* -- and it was just like the one on the picture book we used to have! At night we went to dine at the Bennoch’s

[ Page 9 ]

which was very pleasant. Mr. Bennoch had been at the drawing room. He is such a nice old gentleman and the house is full of interesting things. He was a great friend of Hawthorne’s.

      Today we are going to hear Canon Farrar preach at St. Margaret’s* next Westminsters Abbey, and perhaps we shall go in then a little while afterward – I am going to dine with Susy Travers* tonight and tomorrow we dine with

 [ Page 10 ]

Miss Hogarth and the Dickens’s* -- I haven’t been to the shops much, though I got a pretty ^black^ jacket trimmed with and lace. I think the prices of things are quite as high as at home, but most of the shops I have been in have been the very swell ones. I will bid you all good morning, it being church time. Love to all from

Sarah.

Mrs. Ole telegraphed us that she sailed Wednesday on the Gallia.  

 

Notes                                                                                                                           

O.P .:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Prince of Wales: In 1882, the British Prince of Wales was George Frederick Ernest Albert (1865-1936), grandson of Queen Victoria.  After her death and that of his father, King Edward VIII, he became King George V.

concert:   While it is difficult to be sure at which concert Jewett and Fields observed members of the royal family on the evening of June 15, 1882, according to the Musical Times v. 23, p. 291, the 1882 season of Symphony Concerts at St. James Hall included a performance on June 15, conducted by Charles Hallé, proceeds going to the Royal College of Music.

Mrs. CraikWikipedia says: "Dinah Maria Craik (born Dinah Maria Mulock, also often credited as Miss Mulock or Mrs. Craik) (1826 - 1887) was an English novelist and poet."  Her husband was "George Lillie Craik a partner with Alexander Macmillan in the publishing house of Macmillan & Company.... In 1857 she published the work by which she will be principally remembered, John Halifax, Gentleman, a presentation of the ideals of English middle-class life.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Black: Whom Jewett refers to here is mysterious.  Possibly this is George Nixon Black, Jr. (1842-1928), who in 1883 began building an impressive home, Kragsyde, in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts.

Covent GardenCovent Garden is a district at the east side of London's West End.

Royal Academy: Wikipedia says: "The Royal Academy of Arts (RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly in London. It has a unique position as an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects; its purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and appreciation of the visual arts through exhibitions, education and debate."

on the Bennochs: Julian Hawthorne (1846-1934) was the son of the American author, Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864). Julian and his first wife, Minnie Amelung Hawthorne (1848-1925), named their first son John Francis Bennoch Hawthorne (1872-1960), after Francis Bennoch, a friend of the two families during their residences in London.  Bennoch was head of a wholesale silk business, a member of parliament, and a patron of authors and literature.  See also The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Volume 33 (1887), p. 897.

Temple Church: Wikipedia says: "The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters." The Temple area of London according to Wikipedia, is one of the main legal districts of London.  Located near the center of the city, the area includes the Inns of Court.  Each Inn has its own gardens.

Charles Lamb and Dr. Johnson lived, and GoldsmithCharles Lamb (1775-1834) was a British essayist. a member of the circle of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth.
    Samuel Johnson  (1709-1784) "often referred to as Dr. Johnson, was an English writer who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer."
    Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774) "was an Irish novelist, playwright and poet, who is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770), and his plays The Good-Natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773)."

Macmillans the publisher’s: Wikipedia says that this British publishing firm was founded in 1843 by Daniel and Alexander Macmillan, who published many of the major British novelists and poets of the Victorian period.  An American division was established in New York and sold in 1896.

tickets to see Irving and Ellen Terry the great actors in Romeo & Juliet on Wednesday night:
    Wikipedia says: "Sir Henry Irving (1838 - 1905), born John Henry Brodribb, sometimes known as J. H. Irving, was an English stage actor in the Victorian era, known as an actor-manager because he took complete responsibility (supervision of sets, lighting, direction, casting, as well as playing the leading roles) for season after season at the Lyceum Theatre, establishing himself and his company as representative of English classical theatre. "
    Wikipedia also says: "Dame Alice Ellen Terry, (1847 -1928), known professionally as Ellen Terry, was an English stage actress who became the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain."
    In the 1882 season of the Lyceum, Irving's company produced Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, with Irving (age 44) and Terry (age 35) playing the teenage lovers.  One of the most successful of their Shakespeare productions, the play had 108 consecutive performances, according to The Literary Digest, Volume 44 (1912), p. 118n.

  Thames Embankment to Chelsea: Wikipedia says: "Chelsea Embankment is part of the Thames Embankment, a road and walkway along the north bank of the River Thames in central London, England.
    "The western end of Chelsea Embankment, including a stretch of Cheyne Walk, is in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea; the eastern end, including Grosvenor Road and Millbank, is in the City of Westminster."

Mrs. MerrittWikipedia says: "Anna Massey Lea Merritt (1844–1930) was an American painter. She painted portraits, landscapes and religious scenes and etchings. She was born in Philadelphia but lived and worked in England for most of her life.[1] Merritt worked as a professional artist for most of her adult life, 'living by her brush' before her brief marriage to Henry Merritt and after his death."

It was the Queen’s Drawing Room, and the Prince of Wales: West of Chelsea, where Jewett and Fields called upon Mrs. Merritt is Hampton Court Palace in Richmond upon Thames.  Probably this was the location of the Queen's Drawing Room Reception headed by then Prince of Wales, George Frederick Ernest Albert (1865-1936), grandson of Queen Victoria.

Hyde ParkWikipedia says: "Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in London and one of its Royal Parks." The park includes extensive gardens and various monuments.

seeing the Lord Mayor’s carriageWikipedia says: "The Lord Mayor of London is the City of London's mayor and leader of the City of London Corporation. Within the City, the Lord Mayor is accorded precedence over all individuals except the sovereign and retains various traditional powers, rights and privileges, including the title and style The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London.
    "This office differs from the Mayor of London, which is a popularly elected position and covers the much larger Greater London area."
    The Wikipedia entry on the Lord Mayor includes a photograph of the carriage.  In the 19th century, the title was conferred annually; in 1882, the Lord Mayor was Sir Henry Knight.

Canon Farrar ... St. Margaret’s: Wikipedia says: "The Church of St Margaret, Westminster Abbey, is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the Anglican parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London."
    Wikipedia also says: "Frederic William Farrar (Bombay, 7 August 1831 - Canterbury, 22 March 1903) was a cleric of the Church of England (Anglican), schoolteacher and author."  He was Canon of Westminster (1876 -1895) and eventually became Dean of Canterbury.

Susy Travers:  Susan Travers of Newport, RI (d. 1904) was the daughter of William R. Travers.  Her sister, Matilda, married the artist, Walter Gay.  Though a biographical sketch is difficult to locate, Internet searches indicate that she was an art collector and a patron of the Boston Museum of Art, the New York Botanical Garden, and various philanthropic organizations.

Miss Hogarth and the Dickens’s: Almost certainly, Miss Hogarth is Georgina Hogarth, (1827 - 1917), "the sister-in-law, housekeeper, and adviser of English novelist Charles Dickens and the editor of two volumes of his collected letters after his death." 
    Annie Fields and her husband, James T. Fields, had become close friends of the British novelist, Charles Dickens (1812-1870), and his family.  Charles Dickens married "Catherine Thomson Hogarth (1816–1879), the daughter of George Hogarth, editor of the Evening Chronicle."  They had 10 children.
    Though this is not certain, it seems likely that Jewett and Fields visit the family of Dickens's oldest son, Charles Culliford Boz Dickens (1837 -1896); "A failed businessman, he became the editor of his father's magazine All the Year Round, and a successful writer of dictionaries. He is now most remembered for his two 1879 books, Dickens's Dictionary of London and Dickens's Dictionary of the Thames....
    "In 1861, he married Elisabeth Matilda Moule Evans, daughter of Frederick Mullett Evans, his father's former publisher. They had eight children...."

Mrs. Ole … on the Gallia: Mrs. Ole Bull. See Correspondents
    Completed in 1878, the S. S. Gallia was a Cunard steamer connecting New York and Boston to Liverpool.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

London 20 June

Dear Mary

Sister forgot to bespeak the birthday* but she hopes you will forgive her, and in case that Mother could not remember where the dressing case is she will now state that it is on the floor under her desk and she hopes you will find it convenient. Yesterday evening we went to dine with Mrs. Dickens and Miss Hogarth.*  Young

[ Page 2 ]

Mr. Harry Dickens and his wife* were there too and they were all very pleasant and nice and I enjoyed the evening very much. We had a very good dinner. Mrs. Dickens reminds Mrs. Fields* very much of her father, and she certainly looks like C. D’s pictures. We had a very busy day. We went in the morning to see the National Gallery,* and though I wish we had twice or twenty times the time for it, still I saw it very well. The best pictures

[ Page 3 ]

of the best English artists are there, and many of the best of the old Italian masters, and French and Dutch. Nearly all Turners and Sir Edwin Landseers are there. Rosa Bonheur’s Horse Fair which is finer than you could have the least idea -- as for the Sir Joshua Reynolds pictures and Gainsboroughs and all the rest I have seen copies of them of one kind and another all my life, but nothing is like the original! There

[ Page 4 ]

are pictures by Guido and Raphael and Murillo and all the famous masters.* Of course in different places in Europe there are wonderful single pictures but this is considered the best collection in the world. I learned more in three hours than I could learn in America in three years, just by looking at them for myself. In the afternoon we went out to make some calls and do some errands and

[ Page 5 ]

had a drive through the park coming home, and then went out to dinner, and so it was a very nice day. Today dear old Mrs. Bennoch* came in early, and afterward we started out afoot and poked into some nice shops, where you would be much happier if you could buy everything you saw! We didn’t come home to lunch, but took some tarts to keep us alive at a nice French shop way down Regent St. Then we skipped in a Hansom cab of extra speed to a charity

[ Page 6 ]

meeting at over in St. Mary-le Bone road (which you were to mention as Merril-bun if you mentioned it properly!) It was very interesting and we didn’t stay so long as I should have liked. They were talking over various ‘cases’ and they were very edifying. We came home just in time to see Miss Octavia Hill* whose coming gave Mrs. Fields no end of pleasure, for she is the head and front of charioteering and a most lovely woman. It was really a great thing

[ Page 7 ]

to have met her. I have seen some very pleasant people. By the way James Freeman Clarke is here and we are seeing him. Mrs. Clarke was so nice Sunday, -- we met them at St. Margaret’s Church.* This afternoon late we went to see old Mrs. Procter, Adelaide Procter’s mother and widow of "Barry Cornwall,"* and she was a delightfully bright and funny old lady. They all seem so glad to see Mrs. Fields

[ Page 8 ]

but it brings up so many old associations. I couldn’t help thinking how sad it was for her at the Dickens last night,* but nobody would ever know, she is so lovely and thoughtful for other people. She looks so much better, and really has some colour, and we are both as hungry as we can be. We are at home tonight for a wonder -- and had such a nice dinner -- a sole which is a delicious fish like a flounder, and a duckling which mother would delight in. The London ducklings

[ Page 9 ]

are so tender and delightful and seem to have no relation to the old ducks we are usually acquainted with. We also had a cherry tart which is a pie if it is big enough and this was and sister eated all she could of it on account of its being good -- We are going to stay here until Saturday

[ Page 10 ]

for we have some pleasant things to do. Thursday we are asked to dine at Sydenham* and to a garden party there Saturday also which we shall miss & Friday we are going to George MacDonald's.*  We mean now to spend Sunday at the [deleted word] ^Salisbury^* -- going to the cathedral in the morning & driving to Stonehenge* in the afternoon. I don’t believe that’s true about Mr. Rollins & Mrs. Burleigh.* I saw no sign of it on board ship.  We met her yesterday

[ Up the left margin, then down across the top margin of page 1 ]

though I supposed she had gone to Milan -- Nelly* was with her, and she isn't half so nice looking as she used to be, though she had taken cold she said and was not feeling well.  I had a very pleasant letter from Mr. Rollins today -- Poor Mary Esther!  I did feel very sorry  to hear of her death

[ Up the left margin of page 2 ]

and was so surprised -- What a loss she will be to them

[ Up the left margin of page 3 ]

and Berwick will seem strange without her.  Mrs. Fields

[ Up the left margin and down across the top margin of page 4 ]

sends love -- She enjoys your letters so much -- I am so glad Carrie* is so pleasantly settled --  Goodnight from the Queen* with lots of love


Notes

birthday:  Mary Rice Jewett's birthday was June 18.

Mrs. Dickens and Miss Hogarth:  Almost certainly, Miss Hogarth is Georgina Hogarth, (1827 - 1917), "the sister-in-law, housekeeper, and adviser of English novelist Charles Dickens and the editor of two volumes of his collected letters after his death." 
    Annie Fields and her husband, James T. Fields, had become close friends of the British novelist, Charles Dickens (1812-1870), and his family.  Charles Dickens married "Catherine Thomson Hogarth (1816–1879), the daughter of George Hogarth, editor of the Evening Chronicle."  They had 10 children.
    Though this is not certain, it seems likely that Jewett and Fields visit the family of Dickens's oldest son, Charles Culliford Boz Dickens (1837 -1896); "A failed businessman, he became the editor of his father's magazine All the Year Round, and a successful writer of dictionaries. He is now most remembered for his two 1879 books, Dickens's Dictionary of London and Dickens's Dictionary of the Thames....
 
Harry Dickens and his wifeWikipedia says: "Sir Henry Fielding Dickens, KC (1849 - 1933) was the eighth of ten children born to English author Charles Dickens and his wife Catherine. The most successful of all of Dickens's children, he was a barrister, a KC and Common Serjeant of London, a senior legal office which he held for over 15 years. He was also the last surviving child of Dickens....
    "Henry 'Harry' Dickens married Marie Roche (1852–1940), the daughter of Monsieur Antonin Roche, on 25 October 1876 in Portman Square in London; they had four sons and three daughters together. Within the Dickens family the couple were known as 'The Guvnor' and 'The Mater'. "

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

National Gallery … Turners and Sir Edwin Landseers …  Rosa Bonheur’s Horse Fair … Sir Joshua Reynolds and Gainsboroughs ... Guido and Raphael and MurilloWikipedia says: "The National Gallery is an art museum in Trafalgar Square in the City of Westminster, in Central London. Founded in 1824, it houses a collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900."

    According to Wikipedia, "Joseph Mallord William Turner, RA (1775 - 1851) was an English Romanticist landscape painter. Turner was considered a controversial figure in his day, but is now regarded as the artist who elevated landscape painting to an eminence rivaling history painting."  In 2016, The National Gallery held 10 of Turner's paintings.

    "Sir Edwin Henry Landseer RA (1802 - 1873) was an English painter, well known for his paintings of animals -- particularly horses, dogs and stags. However, his best known works are the lion sculptures in Trafalgar Square.... Landseer was a notable figure in 19th-century British art, and his works can be found in Tate Britain, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Kenwood House and the Wallace Collection in London." Wikipedia

   "Rosa Bonheur, born Marie-Rosalie Bonheur, (1822 - 1899) was a French artist, an animalière (painter of animals) and sculptor, known for her artistic realism. Her most well-known paintings are Ploughing in the Nivernais, first exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1848, and now at Musée d’Orsay in Paris, and The Horse Fair (in French: Le marché aux chevaux), which was exhibited at the Salon of 1853 (finished in 1855) and is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York City. Bonheur is widely considered to be the most famous female painter of the nineteenth century." Wikipedia


Horse Fair

"The Horse Fair"
Rosa Bonheur
Courtesy of Wikipedia


    "Sir Joshua Reynolds RA FRS FRSA (1723 - 1792) was an influential eighteenth-century English painter, specialising in portraits. He promoted the "Grand Style" in painting which depended on idealization of the imperfect. He was a founder and first president of the Royal Academy of Arts, and was knighted by George III in 1769." Wikipedia. In 2016, the National Gallery held 6 paintings by Reynolds.

    "Thomas Gainsborough FRSA (1727 - 1788) was an English portrait and landscape painter, draughtsman, and printmaker. He surpassed his rival Sir Joshua Reynolds to become the dominant British portraitist of the second half of the 18th century." Wikipedia.  In 2016, the National Gallery held 11 paintings by Gainsborough.

    "Guido Reni (1575 - 1642) was an Italian painter of high-Baroque style." Wikipedia.  In 2016, the National Gallery held 12 paintings by Guido.

    "Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (1483 - 1520), known as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form, ease of composition, and visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period."  Wikipedia.  In 2016, the National Gallery held 13 paintings by Raphael.

    "Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617 - 1682) was a Spanish Baroque painter. Although he is best known for his religious works, Murillo also produced a considerable number of paintings of contemporary women and children. These lively, realist portraits of flower girls, street urchins, and beggars constitute an extensive and appealing record of the everyday life of his times."  Wikipedia.  In 2016, the National Gallery held 10 paintings by Murillo.

Mrs. Bennoch:  Francis Bennoch and his wife were London friends of the Hawthorne family.  Bennoch was head of a wholesale silk business, a member of parliament, and a patron of authors and literature.  See Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Volume 33 (1887), p. 897.

  charity meeting at over in St. Mary-le Bone road ...  Miss Octavia Hill … head and front of charioteering: Wikipedia says: "Octavia Hill (1838 - 1912) was an English social reformer, whose main concern was the welfare of the inhabitants of cities, especially London, in the second half of the nineteenth century....
    Hill was a moving force behind the development of social housing ....
    Another of Hill's concerns was the availability of open spaces for poor people. She campaigned against development on existing suburban woodlands, and helped to save London's Hampstead Heath and Parliament Hill Fields from being built on. She was one of the three founders of the National Trust, set up to preserve places of historic interest or natural beauty for the enjoyment of the British public. She was a founder member of the Charity Organisation Society (now the charity Family Action) which organised charitable grants and pioneered a home-visiting service that formed the basis for modern social work."
    Hill resided in Marylebone.
    "Charioteering" is a fanciful name Jewett sometimes gave to the social casework in which Annie Fields was deeply involved in Boston, which was modeled after Hill's work in London.

James Freeman Clarke … St. Margaret’s Church: Wikipedia says: "James Freeman Clarke (1810 - 1888) was an American theologian and author."  After serving in the Unitarian ministry in Louisville, KY, Clarke, "in 1839 he returned to Boston where he and his friends established (1841) the Church of the Disciples which brought together a body of people to apply the Christian religion to social problems of the day."  Chief among these social problems was the abolition of slavery. 
    He married Anna Huidekoper of  Meadville, PA in 1839;  they had four children. See also Dictionary of Unitarian &
Universalist Biography
.

     Wikipedia says: "The Church of St Margaret, Westminster Abbey, is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the Anglican parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London."

Mrs. Procter, Adelaide Procter’s mother and widow of "Barry Cornwall"Wikipedia says: "Adelaide Anne Procter (1825 - 1864) was an English poet and philanthropist. She worked prominently on behalf of unemployed women and the homeless, and was actively involved with feminist groups and journals."  Her parents were the poet Bryan Waller Procter and Anne Skepper Proctor.   Bryan Proctor (1787-1874) wrote under the pseudonym, "Barry Cornwall." Wikipedia

how sad it was for her at the Dickens last night:  Fields would be sad at the Dickens's because she would be reminded of her transAtlantic friendship with Charles Dickens (1812-1870) that blossomed during her marriage to publisher James T. Fields.  Jewett has hoped that this travel together in Europe would help Annie to deal with her grief over James's death on 24 April 1881.

Sydenham: This letter and that of Friday 23 June indicate that Jewett and Fields visit the home of Henry Littleton, Westwood House, in the London suburb of Sydenham. Littleton "had made his fortune from Novello’s the music publisher and Westwood House and its Music Room played host to the musical stars of the Crystal Palace. Dvorak and Liszt both stayed and played at Westwood House."

George MacDonald's: Wikipedia says: "George MacDonald (1824 - 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. He was a pioneering figure in the field of fantasy literature and the mentor of fellow writer Lewis Carroll."

Salisbury .. cathedral … Stonehenge:  The town of Salisbury in south central Great Britain is home to the Salisbury Cathedral.  Nearby is Stonehenge, which according to Wikipedia  is "a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, 2 miles (3 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. Stonehenge's ring of standing stones [is] set within earthworks in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds."

Mr. Rollins & Mrs. Burleigh … Nelly ... Poor Mary Esther: The identities of Mr. Rollins and Mary Esther are not yet known. Mr. Rollins may be a South Berwick neighbor, a member of the prominent Rollins family.  A short walk from her house took her to Rollinsford, NH, named for the family.  Jewett was acquainted with Mrs. Ellen Augusta Lord Rollins (1835-1922) who lived near her South Berwick home.  However, Jewett's letter from 1882 the Scythia suggests that she was not acquainted with this Mr. Rollins before this voyage.  It appears this Mr. Rollins currently is also in Europe.
    Jewett was acquainted with Matilda Buffum (Mrs. John H.) Burleigh, a South Berwick neighbor, the widow of a mill owner and Maine congressman. Wikipedia says "John Holmes Burleigh (1822 - 1877) was a nineteenth-century politician, sailor, manufacturer and banker from Maine. He was the son of the former U.S. representative from Maine."
     However, this Mrs. Burley had neither a daughter nor a sister named Nelly.  The identities of both of these women, therefore, remains uncertain.

Carrie:  Caroline Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

the Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Friday 23 June

London

Dear O.P.* 

     I am snatching a fearful joy while Mrs. Fields* is finishing her breakfast. I seem to have a better time every day -- Day before yesterday after I wrote you we went to view St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Tower of London* -- which were both very full of interesting things. St. Pauls is perfectly immense with an enormously high arched roof -- We didn’t climb into the ball and the whispering gallery as "Rollo" did* -- but contented ourselves with walking about the floor -- There are a great many fine statues and

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and memorials, -- but the great building itself is most interesting outside and in -- though I care much less for it than for Westminster Abbey.* I suppose every one does -- As for the Tower we were both very glad we went there -- it is the very oldest and most worn building you ever imagine, the great stones of the pavement worn deep down where so many feet have trodden for centuries. It was too horrid (even for me!) to see the block where 

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peoples heads were cut off with the axe marks in them and all the armor with holes knocked through and the horrid dungeons way down underneath the ground. We couldn’t get into the State prison as they are restoring it -- where Lady Jane Grey* was confined and so many other people -- The old chapel is beautiful -- and we saw where the princes were buried who were smothered in the Tower* and all sorts of things. It took us a good while to go through. Part of it is an armory. Yesterday we

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went to Westminster Abbey again for we saw nothing of the historical part of it the other day. Henry the Seventh’s Chapel* is the most beautiful place. I could not believe the roof was stone for the carving is like lace almost and all the knight’s banners and coats of arms are around the walls. Mary Queen of Scots and Queen Elizabeth are buried there in gallant big tombs and Dean Stanley’s tomb tomb* is there too, but all the rest are very old.

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Last night we went to Sydenham to dine at the Littletons where Mrs. Cowden-Clarke* is staying, and it was a most beautiful place, a  regularly English place in a park and about thirty people sat down to dinner and we had some music afterward in a big music room that was half nearly as large as our church. I had a very nice time. It was a beautiful night and we were only a little way from the Crystal Palace* and there were splendid fireworks in the evening which we

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could see. We went out in a train. Mrs. Clarke was such a charming little old lady. She is the famous Shakespeare scholar, and lives in Genoa but is here now on a visit and we shall see her when we go there. The dinner was a most elegant one a great many courses -- and one was whitebait those famous little fish that cost so much. They are about an inch

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and a half long and perfectly delicious. It is so funny, nobody drinks water at all, and you don’t even see tumblers on the dinner table, only the wine glasses -- I dont feel thirsty here as I do at home -- and I dont know when I have touched water. I suppose because it is a so much damper climate. I feel so much better than I have for a great while before, in spite of all I have done -- and I sleep like a top. We

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hardly ever get through breakfast before sometime after ten. The day begins later here. I have just come in from dinner at the MacDonald’s* and it was after half past ten and the sunset was not all gone in the west. It was George Macdonald’s and they all were charming people, he is like his best books. We spent the morning at the South Kensington Museum* and it has been a good deal of a day, for the museum is a good like the Centennial* and nearly as large. Tomorrow we go down to the Isle of Wight* for Sunday and shall not be back here for ten days. I am sorry to write in such a hurry, but it will give

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you some idea what I am doing. Mrs. Fields sends love. Yours always, Sarah


Notes

O.P .:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Tower of London: Wikipedia says of these London landmarks:"St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London."  The Tower of London "is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London.... It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078, and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 ... until 1952...."

the ball ... the whispering gallery as "Rollo" didWikipedia says that Jacob Abbott (1803 - 1879) was an American writer of children's books from Maine, a graduate of Bowdoin College, like Jewett's father.  Among his famous serioes of "Rollo" books is Rollo in London (1859).  Rollo and his family tour St. Paul's Cathedral, including the Whispering Gallery and the golden ball at its highest point open to the public in Chapter 9.

Westminster AbbeyWikipedia says: "Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs."

Lady Jane Grey: Wikipedia says: "Lady Jane Grey (1536/1537 - 1554) ... was an English noblewoman and de facto monarch of England and Ireland from 10 July until 19 July 1553.
    "The great-granddaughter of Henry VII through his younger daughter Mary, Jane was a first cousin once removed of Edward VI. ..... When the 15-year-old king lay dying in June 1553, he nominated Jane as successor to the Crown in his will, thus subverting the claims of his half-sisters Mary and Elizabeth under the Third Succession Act. Jane was imprisoned in the Tower of London when the Privy Council decided to change sides and proclaim Mary as queen on 19 July 1553. Jane was convicted of high treason in November 1553, which carried a sentence of death, although her life was initially spared. Wyatt's rebellion of January and February 1554 against Queen Mary I's plans to marry Philip of Spain led to the execution of both Jane and her husband."

princes were buried who were smothered in the Tower: King Richard III of England is believed to have murdered two young sons of his brother, Edward V, who were potential rivals of Richard for the throne. Wikipedia says that whether Richard was directly responsible for their deaths is uncertain.

Henry the Seventh’s Chapel: Wikipedia says: "The Henry VII Lady Chapel, now more often known just as the Henry VII Chapel, is a large Lady chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey, paid for by the will of Henry VII.... The tombs of several monarchs including Henry VII, Edward VI, Elizabeth I, Mary I, James I, Charles II and Mary, Queen of Scots are found in the chapel."

Dean StanleyWikipedia says: "Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, FRS (1815 - 1881), known as Dean Stanley, was an English churchman and academic. He was Dean of Westminster from 1864 to 1881.... He was buried in Henry VII's chapel, in the same grave as his wife."

Sydenham to dine at the Littletons ... Mrs. Cowden-Clarke:  Jewett and Fields visit the home of Alfred Henry Littleton, Westwood House, in the London suburb of Sydenham. Littleton "had made his fortune from Novello’s the music publisher and Westwood House and its Music Room played host to the musical stars of the Crystal Palace. Dvorak and Liszt both stayed and played at Westwood House."
    Wikipedia say that Vincent Novello (1781 - 1861), was English organist, music teacher, and conductor.  His children included Mary Victoria and Alfred Novello, who founded a music publishing business, Novello & Co.
    Wikipedia says "Mary Victoria Cowden Clarke (1809 - 1898) was an English author. She was the eldest daughter of Vincent Novello. In 1828, she married her brother Alfred's business partner, Charles Cowden Clarke, and worked with him on Shakespeare studies."
    According to the Musical Times (June 1, 1911), pp. 365-6, Alfred Henry Littleton (b. 1845), succeeded Alfred Novello as head of Novello & Co.

the Crystal Palace … splendid fireworksWikipedia says: "The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and plate-glass structure originally built in Hyde Park, London, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851.  It was almost completely destroyed by fire in 1936.  The Times of London, page 1, announced on Thursday June 22, 1882: "Crystal Palace this day, great firework display."

George Macdonald'sWikipedia says: "George MacDonald (1824 - 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. He was a pioneering figure in the field of fantasy literature and the mentor of fellow writer Lewis Carroll."

South Kensington Museum: Wikipedia says: "The Victoria and Albert Museum ... London, is the world's largest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4.5 million objects. It was founded in 1852 and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.... [It] has its origins in the Great Exhibition of 1851, with which Henry Cole, the museum's first director, was involved in planning; initially it was known as the Museum of Manufactures, first opening in May 1852 at Marlborough House, but by September had been transferred to Somerset House. At this stage the collections covered both applied art and science. Several of the exhibits from the Exhibition were purchased to form the nucleus of the collection. By February 1854 discussions were underway to transfer the museum to the current site and it was renamed South Kensington Museum.... The laying of the foundation stone of the Aston Webb building (to the left of the main entrance) on 17 May 1899 was the last official public appearance by Queen Victoria. It was during this ceremony that the change of name from the South Kensington Museum to the Victoria and Albert Museum was made public."

like the CentennialWikipedia says: "The Centennial International Exhibition of 1876, the first official World's Fair in the United States, was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from May 10 to November 10, 1876, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia."

Isle of Wight: Wikipedia says: "The Isle of Wight ... is ...the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is located in the English Channel, about 4 miles (6 km) off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape...."

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Newport, Isle of Wight*

Sunday June 25th

Dear Mary

     I think I never had a lovelier day than this has been. We spent last night at Ventnor* a most picturesque and lovely place and this morning started for a long drive across the island. We stopped at the little St. Lawrence church* which was the smallest in the world and having had a large addition put on is only forty feet long now! It is very small and low and stands in an old church yard and is a good deal [like intended?]  the old church of Bonchurch that we saw yesterday near Shanklin, that was build last in 1040! and John Sterling* is buried in the churchyard

  We drove along

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all this morning through lovely English lanes with the hedgerows full of sweet briar and honeysuckle* and smaller flowers at the foot of the hedges, and lovely bits of woods and some times we went past park gates and caught glimpses of beautiful country places beyond. We drove at the foot of the cliffs for a good while and at last came out high up on the downs, great open pastures that slope to the sea, with flocks of sheep dotted all about, and the fields greatest quantity of poppies, bright red as they can be and white daisies and such lovely flowers growing in the grass, and larks* going straight up into the

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air, singing as only larks can sing. We were close by the sea for eight or ten miles. Oh, more than that I should think we drove more than twenty for we went from Ventnor way over to the Needles.* Exactly the other end of the island, and most of it was on the high cliffs, looking first over the fields and little thatch-roofed villages and gray church towers and then out over the blue sea, all streaked with shadows and colors from the clouds. I think the air never was sweeter, it was sweet as it could be, and full of the fragrance of the

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new cut grass, and the honeysuckle and the rest of the flowers. We had a very comfortable landau* with our boxes fastened on behind, and a nice young fellow to drive, and he and Liza were mounted on the box in great majesty. Now I wish I could tell you about the best of it for I really have seen Tennyson!* We were not sure whether he was here or in Surrey, but Mrs. Fields* said she would certainly see if they were here, for it would not do for her to go by their gates, though

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I know she hated to go there after -- it would call up to many old associations.* They were at home and were perfectly delighted to see her, giving her a most lovely welcome and they were so nice to me. They wished us to stay, and asked us to come see them later in Surrey. Both Tennyson and his wife are very feeble and seem old and broken. It is a most beautiful house, and while Mrs. Fields and Tennyson walked on further his son

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who was very nice took me back to the house and up to his fa Tennyson’s study, which of course was most interesting. It is a very great thing to have been there for so few people are received ever when Tennyson is well, or when he was younger. I don’t think any thing could have given me more satisfaction. I must go to bed. Mrs. Fields has gone and we have to be up early in the morning. You never heard such a lovely (chime?) of bells as on Carisbrooke Church* here.

[ Top left margin of page 1 ]

This is heather* from the Isle of Wight -- from the downs.

Notes

Isle of Wight: Wikipedia says: "The Isle of Wight ... is ...the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is located in the English Channel, about 4 miles (6 km) off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape...." 

Ventnor: Wikipedia says: "Ventnor ... is a seaside resort and civil parish[2] established in the Victorian era on the south coast of the Isle of Wight, England."

St. Lawrence church: Wikipedia says that a 12th-century church in the village of St. Lawrence, near Ventnor, is one of the smallest ever built to be a parish church.

  church of Bonchurch ... near Shanklin ... John SterlingWikipedia says that Old St. Boniface Church, Bonchurch, near Ventnor, dates from the 11th century.  The village of Shanklin is about four miles north of Bonchurch and Ventnor.
    According to The Stirlngs of Keir: and their Family Papers (1858) pp. 163-4 by Sir William Fraser, John Sterling (1806 - 1844) was a Scottish author.  He died at Ventnor and was buried at Bonchurch. See also Wikipedia.

sweet briar and honeysuckle: Wikipedia says: "Rosa rubiginosa [or sweet briar] ...is a species of rose native to Europe and western Asia."  Wikipedia also says "Honeysuckles (Lonicera ...) are arching shrubs or twining bines in the family Caprifoliaceae, native to the Northern Hemisphere."

larks: According to Wikipedia, there are several varieties of European larks.  It is probable that Jewett refers to skylarks.

the Needles: Wikipedia says: "The Needles is a row of three distinctive stacks of chalk that rise out of the sea off the western extremity of the Isle of Wight, UK, close to Alum Bay. The Needles Lighthouse stands at the outer, western end of the formation."

landauWikipedia says: "A landau is a coach-building term for a type of four-wheeled, convertible carriage.[1] See also Landau (automobile). It was a city carriage of luxury type. The low shell of the landau made for maximum visibility of the occupants and their clothing,..."

Tennyson: "Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS (1809 - 1892) was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets."  Tennyson's wife was Emily Sarah Sellwood (1813 - 1896), a composer who set some of his lyrics to music.  They had two sons, Hallam and Lionel.
    Hallam Tennyson, 2nd Baron Tennyson (1852 - 1928) became the second Governor-General of Australia and wrote an authorized biography of his father in 1897.  However, it is not clear which of the sons Jewett and Fields meet.
    The Tennysons maintained twos homes:  Farringford House in the village of Freshwater, Isle of Wight, and Aldworth House in Haslemere, Surrey.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

many old associations:  Visiting the Tennysons would be troubling to Annie because she would be reminded of her transAtlantic friendship with Tennyson that began during her marriage to publisher James T. Fields.  Jewett has hoped that this travel together in Europe would help Annie to deal with her grief over James's death on 24 April 1881.

Carisbrooke Church: St. Mary's Church (Church of England) in Carisbrooke, new Newport, Isle of Wight, is noted for its bells.  The Norman church tower contains a ring of 10 bells, which first were rung in 1777.  By 1912, they were no longer usable. Eight were replaced in 1921 and the final two in 2002.

heather: Wikipedia says: "Calluna vulgaris (known as common heather, ling, or simply heather) is the sole species in the genus Calluna in the family Ericaceae. It is a low-growing perennial shrub...." with mauve summer flowers.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

Lynton North Devon
The Royal Castle Hotel!*
2 July 1882

A few words from Sister on the subject of an afternoon in the [ Perrish so spelled] of Morwenstow* may be found of interest… It was of a Thursday morning that we thought we would go and we bespoke a conveyance of the landlady of the New Inn at Clovelly,* and she proffered the services of the basket carriage* and the mule, and a neighbor’s boy to drive (sister being strange to the roads.) [ two deleted words ] at an expense of seven shillings and a trifle for John ^h'^Oak.* So, we climbed to the top of the 

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lane and nearly went into fits at the sight of the mule which proved to be the same size as a donkey and John [ hOak so spelled] also as small for a boy as the mule was for a member of its species! The basket carriage was a first-rate one being low and long and the whole turn out was a scene for a painter. A. F.* and I sat up in state and majesty when we could stop laughing and the mule went skipping off. John Oak took to beating it so hard that we were afraid it might never live to get home, and when he got down from his perch to ease 

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the load, (weighing about as much as a sparrow) we lighted down too, and walked a good part of the way, so we didn’t get to Morwenstow until between five and six. I kept stepping in and out of the chariot as it moved along, and pulling down long wisps of honeysuckle out of the hedgerows and handfuls of sweet-briar.* There is another wild rose that I like very much, a white one, and it is all in bloom now. The honeysuckle makes me think of mother always for she would delight in it so and I daresay I write about it in every letter for I think of it so much and wish I

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could throw her a great bunch of it every time I pick one. The fuchsias look so bright and pretty too. Only the smaller red ones grow wild but they are in such full flowers that they are very graceful and handsome hedges. Then there is a red foxglove, or ‘lady-finger’* as they call it here, that grows wild and is so bright, great tall stalks of it with bells you can put your two fingers in sometimes and always one finger! Sister would like to mention that snails live in the hedges Mary, and take their walks abroad with

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2

their houses on their backs and very nice houses they are  with such pretty shells, and of great size and very slow travelers along a leaf. Also black slugs as long as your finger if they have luck in growing, come out under the hedges in the ditch when the dew falls and sister hates and despises them. She would now end this passage on little beasts (except the mule of which she has more to say) with the information that fleas eats she shameful -- and let A. F. alone except once or twice when they have lost their way to me. John H. Oak clubbed the mule

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along toward Morwenstow and we began to think we never should get there when suddenly we caught sight of the old church tower in a cleft ^high^ between two hills, looking out to sea, and the churchyard round it, and the rectory a little lower on the slope of the hill. It is a beautiful lovely place. There was a big farm house not far away where we left Johnny and the beast of burden and that and another farm a mile or two away on the downs were the only buildings in sight. In the churchyard we found all the graves of

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the wrecked sailors whom he used to bring ashore and bury, and on one grave was the figurehead of a ship and on another pieces of wreck wood that had come ashore. One was the [bows so spelled ] of a boat, and part of the churchyard was thick with these unknown graves. The old church itself dates back eight or nine hundred years and there are beautiful carvings both in wood and stone. We met the present rector vicar and didn’t like him a bit, and in the course of a talk with the Sexton who

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was also the vicar’s servant-man we discovered that there was a jealousy of the old Parson’s fame and that they weren’t inclined to give him much credit either for taking more care of the church and spending more money than he could afford on it, or for his great genius. So we praised him up to the skies and mentioned ourselves to be American pilgrims to that shrine. There is no tablet or anything to him in the church. You know he lost his mind and became a Roman Catholic and both

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3

these failings seem to have dimmed his fame, but he preserved the Cornish history which might have been lost, and made that little church famous for all they may say. Don’t you remember in the history Life, it speaks of his taking such care to teach the parish children? We were quite touched because to this day they all bow and courtesy to you, as you drive by. The older people in Devonshire all give you a nod or touch their hats and say good day to a stranger, and it is very pleasant, but it was so nice to see the children

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at Morwenstow so mannerly and old-fashioned. At the farm house they gave me some questions Parson Hawker had written one for the catechising. Wasn’t that nice? We were starving to death (as usual!) and after we were done looking at the church we went up to the house and asked for some milk and were asked in and had a beautiful time. It was just the kind of old-fashioned English farm house I have been hoping I should see, with a great settle in front of the fireplace and a

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flagstoned floor and beams across the ceiling. I wish you could have seen us eating the bread and butter and milk, for there never was any better in the world and we were so hungry. We talked a while with the people and then we came away. Mother would have thought it was as nice as I did. There was a big walled garden and it was all so pleasant. We didn’t get home until ten o’clock we stayed so long, but it was quite light you know, and the minute that little rat of 

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these things were much disapproved a mule found we were going home it took to its heels and went like a spider, and we were destroyed with rage because it toiled so going over as if it could hardly get along, and John [hoak so written ]  grinned at us as if he knew what he was about and had a right to expect, when he whacked her [x x meaning an ellipsis ?] Clovelly [church poorly written] ^church^ was lovely too, and we stayed in Clovelly to the last minute and shall always like to think of it. We came here yesterday, driving most of the day but going from Bideford to

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4

Ilfracombe* by rail. It was foggy so we lost some fine views which Mrs. Fields* wanted me to see, but now we are at Lynton over Sunday and it is more beautiful than I can tell you. Like of bit of Switzerland dropped down by the sea as Mrs. Fields says. There are enormous cliffs, and just below Lynton is Lynmouth in the valley, a little fishing town, and we can look out of our windows right down on it, and the houses look like those in Noah’s ark* they are so far below us, and the little bright gardens are like dots of red and yellow. I send Mother a little picture

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of one of the Clovelly cottages so she can see how things grow here. Mrs. Fields sends love to you both. We wish this Sunday was a week long at least but tomorrow we must go to London where we shall see the Duchess!* and where we have already made ever so many engagements for this coming week. And on the twelfth eleventh we go to Norway, so I shall be there perhaps when you get this letter. I think it will be very pleasant. When we come back we are going to Edinboro* but it will only be for a day or two. I have always meant to ask you to tell Mrs. Doe* how much I used the

[Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 14]

on shipboard -- it was really a great delight and I used it every day. Good by with love to Uncle William* John & Ann.  From Sarah.

Notes

Lynton North Devon ... The Royal Castle Hotel The Royal Castle Hotel in Lynton, on the north coast of Devon, Great Britain, opened in 1810 and later expanded, though by the 21st century, much of it had been demolished.

the Perrish of Morwenstow: Wikipedia says: "Morwenstow is the most northerly parish in Cornwall….  Morwenstow is the one-time home of the eccentric vicar and poet Robert Stephen Hawker (1803–1875), the writer of Cornwall's anthem Trelawny." Jewett seems to be imitating Hawker's style in her unconventional spelling.

the New Inn at Clovelly: The New Inn Hotel has welcomed visitors since the 17th century. It lies at the heart of Clovelly, half way down the famous cobbled street. Rebuilt and refurbished over the years, it is decorated in the Arts and Crafts style, and is a popular choice with day visitors and for North Devon holidays and short breaks."
     Though Jewett does not mention this, it appears she included with this letter a photograph of this inn.  The photograph appears with her letter of 11 September 1882. 

basket carriageWikipedia says that a Phaeton was sometimes called a basket phaeton.  This type of "sporty open carriage" was considered "fast and dangerous," though perhaps not when a mule pulls it.

John h'Oak:  This presumably is the assisting boy on this journey.  Jewett seems to make a joke of  his name, spelling it in a variety of ways throughout this letter.

A. F.:   Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

honeysuckle… sweet-briarWikipedia says: "Rosa rubiginosa [or sweet briar] ...is a species of rose native to Europe and western Asia."  Wikipedia also says "Honeysuckles (Lonicera ...) are arching shrubs or twining bines in the family Caprifoliaceae, native to the Northern Hemisphere."

fuchsias: Wikipedia says that the many varieties of fuchsia are native to Central and South America.  They attract hummingbirds to pollinate.

a red foxglove, or ‘lady-finger ’: Wikipedia says that the Foxglove is Digitalis, a popular ornamental plant with blooms of varying colors.

BidefordWikipedia says Bideford is a historic port town on the estuary of the River Torridge, about 30 miles west of Lynton, in north Devon, south-west England.  Between them, on the coast is the resort town of  Ilfracombe.   Lynmouth and Lynton are neighboring coastal towns.

the Duchess: The identity of the Duchess is unknown.  However, Jewett and Fields were friends of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Aldrich, whom the fondly called the Duke and Duchess of Ponkapog.  See Correspondents.

Edinboro:  A month later, on August 2, Jewett writes to Mary from Edinburgh, Scotland.

Mrs. DoeEdith Bell Haven (Mrs. Charles Cogwell) Doe. According to her "Find-a-Grave" page, "Edith belonged to a reading group that included Georgina Halliburton, Celia Thaxter, Mary and Sarah Orne Jewett."

Uncle William. John & Ann:  William Durham Jewett and John Tucker.  See Correspondents. Ann was a Jewett family employee.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Red Horse Inn!
Stratford-on-Avon*
9 July 1882

Dear Mary

     I am afraid I shall not get time to write again before I reach Norway so I will send you a letter from here. We left London yesterday morning coming to Oxford which of course I enjoyed immensely. We came on a fast train but it was nothing to the one called the Flying Dutchman* on which we came up from Devonshire a week ago, for that makes sixty miles an hour, and goes like lightning as you may imagine! We had our lunch and then went on driving for an hour or two to see the outside of the colleges. Afterward we went to Magdalen* (or Maudlin as they call it) for Mrs. Fields* wished

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to see Charles Reade* who is one of the fellows. While she went up to his rooms Mrs. Ole* and I scurried all about through the cloisters and halls and the lovely gardens. Anything more beautiful than these old college buildings you can’t conceive. The stonework is very much worn most of them are so old and each has a beautiful chapel [may be spelled chaple] with a tower and part of the buildings are for the most part arranged in squares so there are open quadrangles or "quads" which have walks across them and flowers growing about and you look up at the old walls and windows and roofs and towers and there are no end of bells with nineteen colleges* which mostly have chimes, sweeter than any you ever heard, and 

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they strike the quarter hours -- Mrs. Fields came down with Mr. Reade and he was very nice and showed us all about. We went into a student’s room which was a great pleasure & to the chapel and all round. There is a lovely park with [ deer partially blotted ] in it and such gardens, with turf like velvet. Then we went to the Ruskin Museum and then to Christ church college chapel, which is the finest and largest here, very old and beautiful. We were just in time for service and such cloister boys you never heard in all your days. The hotel next place was the

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Bodleian Library* and you may be sure I was glad to see that famous place. We stayed there a long time looking over the old books and manuscripts and famous portraits. This morning we walked all about again and went into [ Queen's ?  ] College which was lovely. Oxford is very quiet now for it is the long vacation and all the students have gone, but occasionally we saw an Oxford cab scurrying down the street. This afternoon we came here and had time to drive to Anne Hathaway’s*

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cottage where Shakespeare used to go courting, & which is much the same now it was then -- a dear old place. As we came back to Stratford (it is only two miles) we caught site of a lot of little boats in the Avon and I proposed to take "the [ deleted word ] company" out and so we hopped out of the carriage and into a nice boat and I rowed off up the river which goes close by the church where Shakespeare is buried. Mrs. Fields seemed to enjoy it very much, and I’m sure I did. We stayed out an hour or two, going under

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the arches of old stone bridges and under the shadow of the trees. Stratford has probably changed very little since Shakespeare was alive, and it makes him much more real to have seen it. The houses look very old. We went to service in the church which was very pleasant, though it was a high church service which somehow seemed odd there, though I don’t know why it should! We saw Shakespeare’s grave & the tablet on the wall above,* & early tomorrow we are going to the house, which was not open to-day.  -- After-

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ward we are going to Warwick& Kenilworth, and hope to get round by Haddon Hall on our way to Hull, as we can’t very well do anything at sightseeing in this region again. Except to go to York Minster as we come down from [Edinboro so spelled ]. Goodnight for I must follow the others to bed. There are so many things I want to tell you about these later days. With ever so much love from

"The Queen"*

Notes

Red Horse Inn! Stratford-on-AvonStratford-upon-Avon  is in Warwickshire, England, on the River Avon, about 100 miles northwest from London, and about 40 miles northeast of Oxford.  It is now most famous as the birthplace and sometime home of William Shakespeare (1564-1616).
    The Red Horse Inn was known to Jewett and her family from a chapter on "Stratford-Upon-Avon" in The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent., (1819-20) by the American author Washington Irving (1783-1859).

the Flying DutchmanWikipedia says that the Flying Dutchman was an express train between Exeter and London.

Magdalen: Wikipedia says: "Magdalen College ... is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford.... Magdalen stands next to the River Cherwell and has within its grounds a deer park and Addison's Walk. The large, square Magdalen Tower is an Oxford landmark"

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Charles Reade: Wikipedia says: "Charles Reade (1814 - 1884) was an English novelist and dramatist, best known for The Cloister and the Hearth."

Mrs. Ole:  Mrs. Ole Bull. See Correspondents.

with nineteen colleges:  In the early 19th century, Oxford University included 10 colleges.  By the 21st century there were 38.

Ruskin Museum ... Christ church college chapel ... Bodleian Library: There was no Ruskin Museum in Oxford in 1882.  Perhaps Jewett refers to the Ruskin School of Drawing, founded in 1871 by John Ruskin as an Oxford University art school.   
    Christ Church is one of the constituent colleges of Oxford University.  Christ Church Cathedral (Church of England) serves as chapel for the college
    Wikipedia says that the Bodleian Library is "the main research library of the University of Oxford, is one of the oldest libraries in Europe. With over 12 million items, it is the second largest library in Britain after the British Library.... Whilst the Bodleian Library, in its current incarnation, has a continuous history dating back to 1602, its roots date back even further."

Anne Hathaway  ’s:  Anne Hathaway (1555/56 - 1623) was the wife of the English playwright, William Shakespeare.
    Wikipedia says: "Anne Hathaway's Cottage is a twelve-roomed farmhouse where Anne Hathaway, the wife of William Shakespeare, lived as a child in the village of Shottery, Warwickshire, England, about 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Stratford-upon-Avon."

Shakespeare’s grave & the tablet on the wall above: Wikipedia says: "Shakespeare was buried in the chancel of the Holy Trinity Church two days after his death. The epitaph carved into the stone slab covering his grave includes a curse against moving his bones....Sometime before 1623, a funerary monument was erected in his memory on the north wall, with a half-effigy of him in the act of writing. Its plaque compares him to Nestor, Socrates, and Virgil."

Warwick & Kenilworth … Haddon Hall … Hull … York Minster … Edinboro: Jewett and Fields have planned their travel to the Port of Hull through the two historic towns of Warwick and Kenilworth.  Their interest in Kenilworth may stem in part from the1821 novel of that title by Sir Walter Scott.
    Wikipedia says: "Haddon Hall is an English country house on the River Wye at Bakewell, Derbyshire, one of the seats of the Duke of Rutland."
    On their return to London from Edinburgh, they plan to see "The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Saint Peter in York, commonly known as York Minster."
     Jewett regularly spells, Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland, phonetically.

the Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Tuesday 4 o’clock

[Begin letterhead with blank spaces for the date]

Royal Station Hotel

  Hull  _____ 188 __

[End letterhead; Jewett has completed the date]

11 July 1882

Dearest Mary,

     I have only time to send you a few lines. We have just had supper and are going to the steamer presently. We get in on Friday morning so it is quite a voyage. I must wait to tell you about these three last lovely days until

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I get to Norway. And only tell you I have been at Warwick and Kenilworth and the Peacock inn at Rowsley* (such a dear old place built in 1652, and kept in the old fashion.) and at Chatsworth and Haddon Hall* which is perfectly charming. All these since Stratford*

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from which place I sent you a letter. We have gone about in a carriage most of the time and it is such a pleasant way to travel. We left Liza at Leamington and went whisking off one day and [two words] the little (chists?). I hoped I should find a letter waiting here but it will be nice to have it waiting in Bergen, Kenilworth was a splendid

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old place. I do want to tell you all about it; [but ? ] I was disappointed in both Warwick & Chatsworth. The latter is a splendid palace of a place, and there were such flocks of deer in the park! Stoneleigh was another place I drove through on the way from Warwick to Leamington, and it was your ideal English novel country place. We couldn’t stop to see much of the

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house and the old abbey near it. Susy Travers was at the Peacock Inn* which was very pleasant. Mother will say this is written very far apart and very little news but I wanted to gallop through some kind of a note because it would make it so long

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before you heard, at least several days longer than usual. Sister has come into a windmill country today, and there is a kind on a stalk like this that is a great pleasure* to me Goodnight and ever so much love to all from your loving

Queen*

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I had a nice long letter from Carrie* from [unrecognized name ] a few days ago. I get flowers and leaves to send mother almost every day and then they all crumple up before I know it, but I think of her all the same --

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This little rose I have had all day in my button hole, from  Rowsley near Haddon Hall.*


Notes

Royal Station Hotel, Hull: The Royal Station Hotel opened in 1851 near the 1846 train station in Hull, a port city in Yorkshire, England; its full name is Kingston upon Hull.

a great pleasure:  Jewett has drawn a windmill on this page, writing her text around it.

Warwick and Kenilworth and the Peacock inn at Rowsley: Warwick and Kenilworth are towns of historic interest in Warwickshire.  Jewett's interest in Kenilworth may stem in part from the1821 novel of that title by Sir Walter Scott.
    The Peacock Inn at Rowsley dates from 1652, but became a hotel in the 1830s. 

Chatsworth and Haddon Hall: Wikipedia says: "Chatsworth House ... is a stately home in Derbyshire, England. It is in the Derbyshire Dales, about 3.5 miles (5.6 km) north-east of Bakewell and 9 miles (14 km) west of Chesterfield.... It is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire and has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549."
    Wikipedia also says: "Haddon Hall is an English country house on the River Wye at Bakewell, Derbyshire, one of the seats of the Duke of Rutland."

Stratford: Stratford-Upon-Avon, birthplace of William Shakespeare.

Liza:  Liza is a servant of Annie Fields, who accompanied the pair on this trip.

Stoneleigh ...  Leamington: The village of Stoneleigh is near Stoneleigh Abbey and Stoneleigh park in Warwickshire.  This is north of Leamington Spa.

Susy Travers: Susan Travers of Newport, RI (d. 1904) was the daughter of William R. Travers.  Her sister, Matilda, married the artist, Walter Gay.  Though a biographical sketch is difficult to locate, Internet searches indicate that she was an art collector and a patron of the Boston Museum of Art, the New York Botanical Garden, and various philanthropic organizations.

Carrie:  Caroline Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Lysö 20 July 1882

Dearest Mary

     We have just got home from two days spent in Bergen* and I am so glad to get back to the island. There is so much I want to tell you that I hardly know where to begin. I thought I should have no end of time for writing while I was here but I seem to have less than ever. We are out of doors a great deal and the air here makes me sleepy so I usually turn in for a nap in the afternoon and that cuts into the time! as you can tell from Sunday afternoon experiences.  I had a beautiful time Saturday.  We

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went across the fjord to a place called Lysökloster* to return a ceremonious visit which had been paid us by some of Mrs. Ole’s* friends a day or two before. The house was is quite a little distance from the shore so we all three got into a gig which is a two-wheeled vehicle in which two can fit looking forward and one keeps watch astern. It was a little yellow horse with a mane like a big dust brush, and I drove and the crop neck shied and we clipped it to Lysokloster with no accident [unrecognized word ] and were received with much state and majesty. Anything more different than an English country place and a Norwegian one, it would be hard to imagine.  The house itself

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is built around three sides of a square which makes a courtyard and there is a high fence and a big gate in it on the open side. The house is one story and a little half, but there are no end of big rooms and the wide windows make them very pleasant. You cut across the courtyard instead of going round (which would really be a good way at Lysökloster!) and there are ever so many doors. This is one of the old estates which has been handed down with little change for hundreds of years. The tenants wear a dress which is very pretty & seen nowhere else in Norway, but the house servants, some of them came from another province and were "togged out" in

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a most surprising fashion. I have seen very few men in peasant dress which is too bad for it is so handsome. I suppose the ready-made clothing business has driven out the silver buttons and red and green waistcoats. We marched in to the Nicolaisons* and talked as well as we could; there were two funny old ladies from Christian^a visiting^ (Sister loves to talk about Christian sand,* more than any place in Norway!) and two young ladies who could speak a little English that pieced out our rags of Norwegian, beside Mrs. (Nicolaison?) and her daughter Wibeke, which they call Vebekka so I suppose it meant for Rebecca! She is just as nice as she can be, and a great

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crony of Mrs. Ole’s. We were promptly invited to tea, and said we should be delighted to stay, and then we started out after a proper time to see the place. A little river runs in front of the house at the end of a funny old garden and beyond that there is an old church which belongs to the family.  ^There were some old pictures on the walls^ The altar piece is carved and then painted and there was an excellent collection of apostles and saints. Clothed in blue and red and much decked out with faded gilt and trumpets. The other carving was very rude and a droller little church you never saw. A maid in gallant array had fetched the keys which were about a foot long, (more or less) and it was inquired

[13 circled in pencil in another hand appears above the word array.]*

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if we would like to see the other wing of the church where the family [was written over were) buried, and we said we should be pleased, so the doors were opened and to our astonishment instead of -- I don’t know what! we saw long rows of huge oak coffins with here and there a little one, all stowed away. Some of them had iron flowers on the top, and I suppose you think it was dreadful, but it wasn’t! and we walked round and read the dates some of which were very old and tried to read the great brass plates. I almost laughed out loud there was something so funny about the ship’s company after all. Nobody seemed afflicted among the live ones and you were not

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reminded of the next world particularly. It seemed as if the departed Formans* and Nicolaisons felt a good deal of pride in their excellent coffins, and some rivalry about who had the best one! There is something solemn and quaint about all the Norwegians, they are grave, simple people and every body does as his grandfather did before him, and yet they read a great deal and are quite up with the times too, in many ways. We shut the door after we had made this remarkable call and felt as if it had been kind to let in the sun for a little while. The room was plainly finished in unpainted wood like

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the peasants’ houses and one door opened out doors and one into the church. Then we went off to see some ruins out in a field where there was once an old convent founded in 1106 by some monks who came from England and stayed here until thirteen or fourteen hundred and something and then were driven off, and burnt the 'Kloster' before they started. The Nicolaisons set some men to work a few years ago and dug out a lot some new rooms and the whole place is very curious and interesting. They found some stone coffins that must be very old indeed, and the cells [large ink blot] and the chapel were very well-preserved that

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is the walls were, so you could make out the plan very well indeed. Then we mounted into two gigs. Wiebeke and Mrs. Ole & A. F.* and I, and drove up on the hills to see the sunset and it was beautiful. I don’t mean that we watched the whole sunset which takes some hours at this season of the year, but we saw the late afternoon light on some snow covered mountains. There was a regiment of soldiers in camp where we stopped on a little plain, and their tents looked very pretty. You will be amused when I tell you they had to come way down (or rather up) there from Bergen, more than twenty miles, to get

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a place large enough for a parade ground. Everything is all up and down hill in Norway. The soldiers had gone by a day or two before up the fjord in steamers, and as they passed the house the bands played some of Ole Bull’s music and they were waving handkerchiefs and saluting Mrs. Ole, and she had both the big flags out as quick as she could. All the people who can have a flag here to put up before the house. The music sounded finely from the water, and it is really most touching to see how much the country people seem to 

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have loved Ole Bull.* They even called him their king sometimes, for he was a great politician and through him they gained a great deal beside the music he gave them. It is beautiful to see the way everybody treats Mrs. Ole. I did pity her so much the other day when the bands were playing, she seeming to feel so badly. The Norwegian airs are very plaintive at any rate -- -- But I must tell you about the supper at Lysökloster which was very good indeed, [deleted word] for we had two kinds of bread with caraway seed and two without, and salad

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and a kind of herring that is the best little fish you ever saw, smoked a little with juniper twigs, and salmon cured in a way that would make you try to eat the whole one, and there were ‘kinds’ of preserve and kinds of cheese and kinds of cake and you never saw such delicious things. A Norwegian tea is a good meal, but when it comes to a supper, words fail me! Really the cooking is something wonderful, and you get so hungry in the long days and with the

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fresh air and being on the water so much. After supper we each went solemnly to Mrs. Nicolaison and said "Tak for maden" which means thanks for the meal, and she mentioned we were quite welcome -- Wilkommen, and we shook hands -- and then we all shook hands with each other and said "Tak for gud scheloska" which means thanks for your good company, and then we went back to the parlour, and about ten it still being late in the afternoon we ‘clipped it’ back to the shore with the yellow horse and Haldor* was there with the boat and we rowed

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over to Lysö. Lyso-kloster^-house^ looks like a village. The servants live in a house by themselves near the big one except the housekeeper perhaps, and all the barns and storehouses are small and grouped together. When they want more room they build one, never [deleted word] it on to the ^enlarge the^ first! ("put on twenty-fort to the barn")

            Monday we went to Bergen on the steamer by a roundabout way through the fjords which was very pleasant. We drove about a good deal there and went to some shops and saw some pleasant people, one being Mr. Grieg* the famous composer.  Today we came out most of

[Up the left margin of page 11 and down the top margin]

the way in three carrioles* with a stalwart peasant on the perch behind each one! It was great fun.  Good by with lots of love to all, from Sarah.

[Up the left margin of page 1 and down the top margin]  

You don’t know what a blessing the lace you gave me has been, and I like it better and better. Mrs. Fields was so pleased with your letter.

             I am so glad to hear all the news from home but I have so much to tell I never stop to talk about it when I write --

[Up the left margin of page 16]

Love to Cora.* I have had to write her little bits of letters lately, but you must let her see these.



Notes

Bergen: Bergen, on the west coast, is the second largest city in Norway.

Lysökloster: Wikipedia says: "Lyse Abbey or Saint Mary's Abbey, Lyse (Norwegian: Lyse kloster, Lyse Mariakloster) is a now-ruined Cistercian monastery in the municipality of Os in the county of Hordaland in south-western Norway."  In Ole Bull: A Memoir (1882), Sara Chapman Thorp Bull describes her husband's beloved home on nearby Lysö, "the island of light" (pp. 306-13).

  Mrs. Ole:  Mrs. Ole Bull. See Correspondents.

the Nicolaisons:   Nicolay Nicolaysen (1804-1875) married Anna Dorthea Nagel (1822-1905), his second wife, and was the father of Wibecke Nicolaysen (1846-1930).  They lived on a large farm at Lyse Kloster and were close friends with Ole Bull, according to Trond Indahl.  This is not Nicolay Nicolaysen (1817-1911) the famous Norwegian archaeologist.

Christian sand:   Wikipedia says: "Kristiansand ... historically Christiansand, is a city and municipality in Norway. It is the fifth largest city in Norway.

the departed Formans and NicolaisonsHenrik H. Formann  (1800-1871) was a farmer and property owner at Lyse Abbey. According to Trond Indahl, Formann was the owner of the island that Ole Bull bought after Formann's death, on which to build his villa.  Presumably Formann and his ancestors, along with the Nicolaysens are the main families buried in this crypt.

A. F .:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

loved Ole Bull:  In Ole Bull: A Memoir (1882), Sara Chapman Thorp Bull describes a similar musical tribute during her husband's final illness (p. 313).

Haldor:  In Ole Bull: A Memoir (1882), Sara Chapman Thorp Bull identifies Haldor as her family servant (p. 309).

carrioles:  A cariole (also spelled carriole) was a type of carriage used in the 19th century. It was a light, small, two- or four-wheeled vehicle, open or covered, drawn by a single horse.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cariole

Cora: Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Lysö 27 July [ 1882]

Dear O.P.*

     This is the last letter you will get from Norway, for tomorrow we are going down to Bergen and Saturday we take the steamer back to Hull.* I am so sorry to leave Lysö, but there is always so much to leave look forward to this summer that I can’t help being in hurries to see the places ahead. It has been beautiful weather the last few days and the mountains are magnificent. Sometimes we walk and sometimes go off in a boat. While it

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was so damp I had the rheumatism a little but I am getting over it now. It rained a good deal, but it was so pleasant in the house with bright birch wood fires in all the fireplaces that we did not mind it. All the company have departed, and for two days we have not had any body to dinner but for several days big boat loads would be seen crossing the fjord, and then there would be such a feasting! It is the proper thing for

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them to come to visit Frӓ Ole.* One day she and Mrs. Fields* had gone off for a long walk and I looked out and saw six friends approaching and you would have laughed to hear me try to be polite. I got Martha the housekeeper and some of them know a little English and two I had seen before, so I got along beautifully, and they were in full feather when Mrs. Ole came back. I got your letter of the fourth

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of July today, and I was so glad to hear so many particulars. Mrs. Fields had the Advertiser* sent her so I keep up with the news after [   ]. I was sorry to see that Governor Goodwin* had died. Mrs. Fields enjoys your letters so much. She and I have just been across the fjord with Haldor the best man to get Liza’s* valise mended. You see there are no villages and so you go down the fjord to the shoemaker’s and up the fjord to the carpenter’s and the time taken in

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going shopping in this way is very considerable.  We sat on a big rock while Haldor trotted up to the house with the bag. We meant to go too for we like so much to see the insides of the peasant’s houses but there seemed to be a swamp just above the shore, so we gave it up, and sat in the sun. I don’t feel as if I had seen any summer yet, for there is no such heat as we have at home, and I like it better. The climate is ever so much better in England I think 

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than anywhere I have been, and I shall be glad to have a few more days there. We have a good deal to do in London. Sister is dying to see Holland! We mean now to stop in Antwerp over next Sunday and then go to Amsterdam and then down the Rhine. We mean to be at Montreux or Interlaken in Switzerland the tenth of August. I like to tell you where I am going to be so you will know [where corrected] to think of me [14 circled in pencil in another hand) sometimes! With love to all

[yours corrected]  the Queen*

Notes

Lysö:  In Ole Bull: A Memoir (1882), Sara Chapman Thorp Bull describes her husband's beloved home on nearby Lysö, "the island of light" (pp. 306-13).

O.P .:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Hull: A port city in Yorkshire, England; its full name is Kingston upon Hull.

Frӓ Ole:   Mrs. Ole Bull. See Correspondents

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Advertiser:   Wikipedia says: "The Boston Daily Advertiser (est. 1813) was the first daily newspaper in Boston, and for many years the only daily paper in Boston."

Governor GoodwinWikipedia says: "Ichabod Goodwin (October 8, 1794 – July 4, 1882) was the 27th governor of the state of New Hampshire from 1859 to 1861."
    "Goodwin was born at North Berwick, Maine and educated in South Berwick. He became a merchant in Portsmouth, New Hampshire working in the counting house of Samuel Lord, becoming master and part owner of several ships, and eventually the owner of two railroads, two banks, and a textile factory. In 1827 he married Sarah Parker Rice. Their daughter Susan married admiral George Dewey."

Haldor:  In Ole Bull: A Memoir (1882), Sara Chapman Thorp Bull identifies Haldor as her family servant (p. 309).

Liza:  Personal servant of Annie Fields, who accompanied the pair on this trip.

the Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


The North Sea!

Thursday -- [1882 penciled in another hand]

Dear O. P.*

     I have grabbed some paper to tell you that the voyage is nearly at an end, for we have come in sight of land this afternoon and shall put into port at Stavanger* early this evening. Mrs Ole* says the steamer always [stops corrected] there several hours, and so we can go ashore and have supper & a drive. Then we come on board again and shall get into Bergen some time tomorrow morning

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but we are on smooth water all the time unless the wind should come up very much. It has been very smooth for the North Sea but that isn’t saying it was like a river! However by keeping quiet we have been comfortable and none of us have been sick though there were one or two times of uncertainty!! The coast looks barren and rocky and there is a row of great mountains all along -- -- I never thought to tell you that one day driving in Hyde Park in London I had several good looks at the Princess of

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[of repeated] Wales and her little girls and quite fell in love with her she is so lovely. Wasn’t it too bad Miss Thackeray/Mrs. Ritchie has been out of town both times we have been in London, and just the day we were coming away she heard of our being there and wrote such a charming letter to ask us to come to her. I do hope we shall get time, but we shall be in a hurry when we go back, [deleted mark ] and may have to go right through to the continent.* Goodbye with love from

Sarah --

Notes

O.P .:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Stavanger:  Stavanger, Norway is a short distance from Lyse, about 200 km from Bergen.

Mrs. Ole:  Mrs. Ole Bull. See Correspondents.

continent:  14 is circled in pencil above this word in another hand.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



 SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Edinburgh 2 August

Dear Mary 

     We had so little time that we gave up seeing any thing of Scotland, but I couldn’t bear not to see Edinburgh at all so I have scooted up here (with Liza* for protector!) just for a day or two. and I am so glad I did, for it is a great satisfaction to have seen the beautiful old city where so many men and women have lived whom I have known in books. I got here too late today to see Holyrood Palace where Mary Queen of Scots lived,* but I shall have time to go there to-morrow. I have

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been driving all about the old town and new town this afternoon, and anything more quaint and curious than the old city you never saw! Some of the houses I saw are twelve stones high and as they were built before the days of elevators I should think the people who lived in the top-lofts must have had a struggle for existence!! I saw John Knox’s house and the Burns monument and the beautiful Scott Monument* which is very near the hotel -- indeed I have taken a good look at the outside of the Edinburgh and tomorrow I am going

[ Page 3 ]

into Holyrood and the castle. It brings back Scott’s novels and "Rab and his friends" and every thing about Burns and Christopher North* and so many other people, to be here. The names of the streets are all so familiar and I would almost as soon have missed seeing London as this Edinburgh. Mrs. Ole and A. F.* went down to London when I came here and I am to join them late tomorrow night. We had a very good passage from Norway, the days went very fast, and very comfortably. Except one when I turned in at night

[ Page 4 ]

in a very shaky state, but I was not seasick. I don’t know what has come over me! but I suppose I shall catch it crossing the channel Saturday! We landed in Hull early yesterday morning and came to York to spend the night leaving there early to day. The Old York of all is a most amusing place and the original York Minster* is more beautiful than any words of mine can describe. I meant to get some pictures of it, but none of them did it any justice. The arches are so high that

[ Page 5

 Letterhead appears below the first line of the letter ]

 

The Windsor Hotel,

Edinburgh

 

[End letterhead]

 

2

you look up and up and up at their beautiful curves and they seem to go almost to the sky itself. We drove about the curious crooked old town for an hour or two and then went to service and the music was most beautiful. Flocks of little white-surpliced chorister boys come down the aisles two by two with the men singers and the clergymen following, and they sing like angels, and the organ music is wonderfully beautiful too. It does seem so silly to mock such a service in little wooden churches. After you have

[ Page 6 ]

heard the chanting in a great cathedral, you like to think of it, but you don’t care much for the church of the Advent proceedings! The cathedral was first built in 600, just think of it! and I went down into the crypt (or under the lower arches below the floor) and saw a piece of the old wall. We The stained-glass windows are the finest in England and perfectly beautiful, so rich and dim, and the light in the minster is most lovely. On the way here

[ Page 7

I came through Durham and saw Durham Cathedral and castle,* both of which are very near the railroad. I should like to go in! but it is some thing to have seen the outside. I came through Berwick-on-Tweed* too, and a gray-looking timeworn place it is. Down near Newcastle you don’t know what a desolate looking country there is, all among the collieries, the soil is so black and everything is grimy. It really was delightful just to know I had crossed the line and was in Scotland, and

[ Page 8 ]

in fact it was happiness enough just to get back to England. Norway was as charming as it could be, but when we got out into the country from Hull, I felt as if I were getting home after a visit. I am afraid I shall have to give up the pleasure of bringing so many things home as I hoped and planned, for it takes my hoard pretty fast just to go about. I suppose it will be different at the countryside but the shops here are pretty much like those at home and things are no cheaper. I must say goodnight

[Up the left margin of page 5]

with love to all of you. Yours always lovingly, Sarah.

Notes

Liza: Liza is a servant of Annie Fields, who accompanied the pair on this trip.

Holyrood Palace ... Mary Queen of ScotsWikipedia says: "The Palace of Holyroodhouse..., commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland. The 16th century Historic Apartments of Mary, Queen of Scots and the State Apartments, used for official and state entertaining, are open to the public throughout the year, except when members of the Royal Family are in residence."  Mary Stuart was Queen of Scots from 1542 to 1567, when she was forced to abdicate.  In 1587, Queen Elizabeth I of England, seeing her as a threat to the English throne had her executed.

John Knox’s house and the Burns monument and the beautiful Scott Monument: Wikipedia says:" John Knox (c. 1513 –- 1572) was a Scottish minister, theologian, and writer who was a leader of the Reformation and is considered the founder of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland."  He lived his final years at what is now the John Knox House in Edinburgh.
   Wikipedia also says: Robert Burns (1759 - 1796), ... was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland.... " 

  Burns Edinburgh

The Burns monument in Edinburgh is one of dozens throughout the world.


   Wikipedia also says: "Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet, FRSE (1771 - 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright and poet....
    "In Edinburgh, the 61.1-metre-tall Victorian Gothic spire of the Scott Monument was designed by George Meikle Kemp. It was completed in 1844, 12 years after Scott's death, and dominates the south side of Princes Street."

"Rab and his friends" ... Christopher NorthWikipedia says: "John Brown ... (1810 - 1882) was a Scottish physician and essayist best known for his 3-volume collection Horae Subsecivae (Leisure Hours, 1858), which included essays and papers on art, medical history and biography. Of the first, his dog story "Rab and his Friends" (1859), and his essays "Pet Marjorie" (1863), on Marjorie Fleming, ten-year-old prodigy and "pet" of Walter Scott,[1] "Our Dogs", "Minchmoor", and "The Enterkine" are the most notable."
    Wikipedia also says: "John Wilson of Elleray ... (1785 - l 1854) was a Scottish advocate, literary critic and author, the writer most frequently identified with the pseudonym Christopher North of Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. He was professor of Moral Philosophy at Edinburgh University (1820–51)."

Mrs. Ole and A. F .:     Mrs. Ole Bull and Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents. "The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Saint Peter in York is commonly known as York Minster."

Durham Cathedral and castle: Wikipedia says that Durham his a historic city in northeast England. "The city lies on the River Wear, to the west of Sunderland, south of Newcastle upon Tyne and to the north of Darlington. Founded over the final resting place of St Cuthbert, its Norman cathedral became a centre of pilgrimage in medieval England. The cathedral and adjacent 11th-century castle were designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986. The castle has been the home of Durham University since 1832."

Berwick-on-Tweed: Wikipedia says that Berwick-upon-Tweed is the northenmost town in England, just 2.5 miles from the Scottish border.  Jewett was particularly interested in this town from which she believed her home town of South Berwick, ME took its name.  South Berwick sits near the border between Maine and New Hampshire.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Antwerp -----
            6 August 1882


Dear [ deleted word ] Mary

    I started to write a letter to somebody else, meaning to write two or three and to write yours afterward but I concluded I was too sleepy! I am glad we are well across the channel but it is too nasty for anything and I am glad we shall have only the short passage (from Calais to Dover) to take when we are coming back in October. We were an hour late getting into Ostend and then after we had our trunks examined we came

[ Page 2 ]

straight on here without stopping at either Bruges, Ghent or Brussels [though corrected, perhaps inserted ]  we had meant to stay at the latter place. Antwerp is much more interesting and we have had a lovely day here. It is so nice to have had a Sunday to begin with, for the people are all out and it was the day too to see the great pictures in the Cathedral and museum by Van dyke and Rubens.* They are astonishingly beautiful. Do you remember that little coloured print of the Descent from the Cross that Mrs. [Nedick ? ]* brought mother years ago? I saw the original of that, one of the most splendid pictures in the

[ Page 3 ]

world! and I was surprised to find how well the little picture was coloured. But people may talk about good copies -- nothing gives you any idea of the beauty of the pictures themselves, and the colors are so rich, and the faces look down at you from the wall as if they were [ deleted word ] alive The hotel where [we corrected] are is close to the Cathedral and we hear the bells chiming every few minutes. Only think of a chime of ninety bells! You never heard more lovely music than they make

[ Page 4 ]

and there is one old fellow it takes sixteen men to ring. I wonder what Walton Bell* would have to offer on that subject? The spire is more than four hundred feet high and carved in gray stone until it looks like lacework. Most of the shops were open when we started for mass this morning, and we were tempted by some wooden spoons in one window. (Price seven cents.) Tomorrow late in the morning we are going to Rotterdam and we shall spend the night in either the Hague or Amsterdam, probably the latter. Every thing is so different here from England, the men in blouses

[ Page 5 ]

and wooden shoes and the women in flapping lace caps. I thought first I would get some lace here [ deleted word ] in Brussels, but Paris is the best place now for all such things. Though I may go out early tomorrow to some shops Jim McHenry* told me about, and see if there is any thing I want and if I can get it at a decent price. I always had an idea you could get things cheaper in England but my experience is that they are quite as much and oftener more. Travelling is more expensive there than any where else, and some days money fairly flew out of my pocket for carriage, and hotels and

[ Page 6 ]

porters &c. But I must say one thing, that I never felt so certain of getting my money’s worth and that’s the main point! I only hope you won’t be disappointed because I shall have so few things to bring home. As for many pictures and curiosities and things of that kind, I found they were going to be pretty much out of the question if I wanted to see the places we had started for, and I do think that is the most importance [so written]. I would rather see Antwerp Cathedral than have any good clothes I ever saw! I can see Mother laugh and say she supposes the Queen is

[ Page 7 ]

running ashore! but such is not the case quite yet. Only she was moved to make the foregoing reflections on the vanity of riches that you bring abroad . . . . .

             I did not have time to write at all while I was in London this last time but I got there all [right corrected ] from Edinburgh and found Mrs. Fields* waiting up for me with a delicious little supper. Plums are now ripe, and such big sweet plums as you never saw! We are always going head first into a bag full of them and we often have some rolls and fruit for lunch and like nothing better. The fruit is so rich

[ Page 8 ]

and sweet here, not like the tasteless out-west fruit. Mrs. Fields and I got a lot of letters in London which was pleasant enough, and Mr. Whittier sent us a letter of introduction to John Bright which we left at his house in Piccadilly* but too late for any good to come of it though ^for^ he sent a note asking us to come there the morning we left. We have had charming letters from thy friend all the way along and Mrs. Fields has written him several times but I have only managed to send two letters. I must tell you of the most beautiful day Mrs. Fields and I had. We went part way up the Thames by boat and part by train to

[ Page 9 ]

Richmond where we had a lovely drive and lunched at the "Star and Garter" like people in novels.* It is a beautiful hotel on the hill overlooking the Thames and the view is perfectly exquisite across the country. You know what a celebrated place it is? We saw Pope’s Villa at Twickenham and drove along near the river and through Bushey Park.* I wish you could see one avenue, a mile long and horse Chestnut trees five in a row on each side as big as that one by Mr. Hobbs’s.* You can’t think how beautiful it is to look in among them* as you drive along. We

[ Page 10 ]

were on our way to Hampton Court Palace, which was even more beautiful than I imagined. It isn’t a royal palace any more, but old ladies live there, who are [ are repeated ] very poor and of very high degree and there were the brass door plates of Lady this and that, ^scrubbed^ very bright, fastened up by the entrances --  It is getting too late to write any more, but you may expect to have advices from Holland very soon. Sister has seen sights of windmills already. She said good-by to Mrs. Ole* in London but perhaps she will join us in Switzerland. We weren’t sick on the Channel! Farewell! from Sarah

Notes

Antwerp… pictures in the Cathedral and museum by Van dyke and Rubens … Descent from the Cros s:  The Cathedral of Our Lady, a Roman Catholic cathedral in Antwerp, Belgium.  The largest bell in the church's tower requires sixteen ringers.
     Among three paintings by Peter Paul Rubens in the cathedral is "The Descent from the Cross" (1612-14), which is the central panel of a tryptych. Wikipedia says: "Sir Peter Paul Rubens ...  (1577 -1640) was a Flemish Baroque painter. A proponent of an extravagant Baroque style that emphasized movement, colour, and sensuality, ..."
    Wikipedia says: Sir Anthony van Dyck... (1599 - 1641) was a Flemish Baroque artist who became the leading court painter in England, after enjoying great success in Italy and Flanders. He is most famous for his portraits of Charles I of England and his family and court, painted with a relaxed elegance that was to be the dominant influence on English portrait-painting for the next 150 years...."
    The Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp holds a number of paintings by both Rubens and Van Dyck.

Mrs. [Nedick ? ]:  This transcription is uncertain and the person unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Walton Bell:  This person has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Jim McHenry: This may be James McHenry (1817-1891) a backer of the Atlantic and Great Western Railway, who spent considerable time in Europe raising funds for the project.  Further information is welcome.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Mr. Whittier ... John Bright which we left at his house in Piccadilly: John Greenleaf Whittier, "the Quaker poet."  See Correspondents. Fields and Jewett affectionately referred to the American poet John Greenleaf Whittier as "thy friend."
    Wikipedia says: John Bright (1811 - 1889), Quaker, was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies.

Richmond …lunched at the "Star and Garter" like people in novels: Wikipedia says: "The Star and Garter Hotel ... was ... located in the London countryside (later suburbs) on Richmond Hill overlooking the Thames Valley, on the site later occupied by the Royal Star and Garter Home, Richmond. The first establishment on the site, an inn built in 1738, was relatively small. This was followed by several other buildings of increasing size and varied design as the site changed from family ownership to being run by a limited company. "  Literary figures who frequented the establishment included Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and William Makepeace Thackeray, and the inn appeared in several Victorian novels.

Pope’s Villa at Twickenham ... Bushey Park: Wikipedia says: Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet, he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare....
    "The money made from his translation of Homer allowed Pope to move in 1719 to a villa at Twickenham, where he created his now famous grotto and gardens. The serendipitous discovery of a spring during the subterranean retreat's excavations enabled it to be filled with the relaxing sound of trickling water, which would quietly echo around the chambers.... Although the house and gardens have long since been demolished, much of this grotto still survives. The grotto now lies beneath Radnor House Independent Co-ed School, and is occasionally opened to the public."
    Presumably, Jewett refers to Bushy Park, of which Wikipedia says: Bushy Park in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames is the second largest of London's Royal Parks .... The park, most of which is open to the public, is immediately north of Hampton Court Palace and Hampton Court Park and is a few minutes' walk from the north side of Kingston Bridge."  Among the features of the park was the main thoroughfare, a Chestnut Avenue, "designed by Sir Christopher Wren as a grand approach to Hampton Court Palace."

Mr. Hobbs’s:  It is difficult to know to which Mr. Hobbs Jewett refers.  There were at least two houses near to the Jewett houses in South Berwick that were occupied by members of the Hobbs family in 1882: the Cushing Mansion and  the Charles E. Hobbs house, home of a local grocer.

them:  The number 17 is circled in pencil in another hand above this word.

Mrs. Ole:  Mrs. Ole Bull. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



 
116

SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Amsterdam

7 August 1882

Dear Mary

     We have had a most beautiful occasion here. We fell so deep in love with the place that we have stayed over another day and only wish it were a week. We did not stay long in Rotterdam because we were told that there was not much to see and it would be more satisfactory to spend the extra time here. [ deleted word ] So we were only there two or three hours -- long enough to drive about.  We thought

[ Page 2 ]

that was a curious old place enough, but it is nothing to this! The canals intersect the city in every direction and you walk across little foot bridges and drive across larger ones. The ships come right into the heart of the city and you are forever kept waiting because the draw is up -- The houses are very high with such funny gables in all sorts of fancy patterns, and most of the houses are almost black with the window sashes and trimmings painted white and they look as old as the hills. One old coop leans out into the street and one settles backward and it is very odd

[ Page 3 ]

2

and funny. The women wear all sorts of queer headdresses. This afternoon we did a lovely thing. We took a little steamer and went down one of the canals to Zaardam [ meaning Zaandam ] where Peter the Great* lived once in disguise and learned shipbuilding, and we went into his little house which is taken great care of now and has another house built over it. Then we went off in a carriage ten or twelve miles to Broek a famous little village which is supposed to be the cleanest town in the world. We went through three or four other Dutch villages on the way, and were driving on the top of the dykes

[ Page 4

which are broad enough to make splendid roads. They are very high so we could see the canals with all their boats and the great sea-canal which is ever so many feet higher than the land. (I mean the fields) The ships come through that way now from the Channel and the North Sea to Amsterdam instead of going up around the North of Holland. Uncle [William corrected]* will know about it. You never saw anything stranger than looking up from the fields and seeing the ships perched up so high. Holland is lower than the sea, which gives you some idea of the patience of these people in the

[ Page 5 ]

building the dykes and keeping the water out and reclaiming so much land from the sea. They are always working like ants in a hill. The land is really beautiful, and the farms so green and flourishing, and the black and white Dutch cattle look so pretty scattered through the fields. There is only a quarter or half an acre in a piece and a wide ditch all round out it, and little bridges from one field to another -- I counted 126  big windmills this after

[ Page 6 ]

noon from the deck of the steamer in a few minutes. There were [groves corrected] of them around Zaardam [meaning Zaandam]. We went into a big dairy and cheese house at Broak and all over the house. The cattle live in one end and there are muslin curtains at the little windows that light their stalls!!! It was a charming afternoon. I am so delighted to have seen Holland. Mrs. Fields has gone to bed and so must I, for we have to be up early. Tell John* I don’t know

[ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 5 ]

  when I have had a letter that pleased me more that his. It was so nice and I hope he will write soon again. Give my love to him and to Anna and

[ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 6 ]

  William --  Mrs. Fields* sends love to all & so do I. Your loving Queen.*

[ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 1.

It is not clear at what point Jewett meant this to be read. ]

Do give my love to Annie Barker.* We go to Cologne tomorrow afternoon --  Sister loves Amsterdam --

Notes

Zaandam … Peter the Great:   Wikipedia says:  "Zaandam ... is a city in the Netherlands, in the province of North Holland. ...
   " In 1697 the czar Peter I of Russia spent some time in Zaandam, studying shipbuilding. The house where he stayed is preserved as a museum, the Czar Peter House."

Broek:   Wikipedia says:  "Broek in Waterland is a town in the Dutch province of North Holland ....  In the 17th and 18th century, the town was a popular residence for merchants and seafarers from Amsterdam."

Uncle William:  William Durham Jewett.  See Correspondents

John & Anna:   John Tucker. See Correspondents. Anna was a Jewett family employee.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Annie Barker:  Paula Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett (2002) identifies Barker as a Jewett friend and neighbor (p. 45). She is mentioned frequently in Jewett's 1869 diary.

Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



[It is unclear how the following pages relate to the other letters from Jewett's time in Europe.  They consist of pencil notes and drawings, very light and difficult to transcribe.]

[ Page 1]

Zaandam. Enormous lumber centre. immense no. of wind mills mostly sawing    3 [unrecognized word -- gang sows?] each.  Almost afloat.   41 mills in sight on one side of train.             land [unrecognized word -- left?]

Sheep

Showers instantaneous

A drawing of a windmill fills the lower left quarter of the page.

[ Page 2 ]

Beyond [ unrecognized name ] great stretches of meadow dotted with the whitest of [sheep ?]. & Holstein cattle.  Fine storks flying

just before Hoorn ran along just under lee of great dikes on other side of wh. was ZyderZee --

[ On the left side of this page is a drawing of a building with a steep thatched roof, labeled: Stable Hoorn.  Below the drawing is a circled number, 18, which probably is by another hand.]

            Beyond Hoorn elm trees begin.  Also many willows.  Houses brick, blue or white stripe 2' high around bottom.  Tree trunks blue sometimes -- Broad daylight at 8 o-clock

Many very high peaked thatched roofs

[ Page 3 ]

[ Left top corner of left section of a page that was folded contains a drawing of a house with two chimneys and a high, steep roof.  At the peak is a flat space that is labeled: Storks nest].

[Unrecognized word or abbreviation -- St. ?]

Beyond Hoorn.

            Storks all out in fields for supper.

[ Page 4

Not clear that this page belongs with the previous pages.]

[ Written down the right side of an otherwise blank page]

E. L. P. New Eng. fr. Liv. 17th.

 
Note

The manuscript of these notes is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[Postkarte addressed to Miss Mary R. Jewett. South Berwick, Maine, U.S.A.

Text appears on the message side. ]

Interlaken. Sunday 13th August.

             _______

             We reached here last night and I meant to send you a letter but I am pretty tired and am going to get rested before I even [ unreadable word written over another  ] my letters. It is more lovely here than you can possibly imagine, and the mountains are all in full view. This week on our way from Amsterdam we have stopped at Cologne, -- & Heidelberg and Lucerne, and I shall have so much to tell you about when I write which will be tomorrow or next day. I have been going farther away which makes the letters longer in getting

 [Written up the right margin and upside down on in the top margin]

  to you. I was so delighted to get Mother’s letter. With love, [signature obscured by a tear]


Note

The manuscript of this card is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

Interlaken

17 August 1882

Dear Mary

      I haven’t a great deal to tell you for we are leading a very quiet life! It has rained nearly every afternoon and nobody has cared, for it is so pleasant here in our rooms looking up the valley and seeing the clouds blowing about among the mountains. We read aloud a good deal and talk a good deal more! and Mrs. Fields* and I have great fun studying

 [ Page 2 ]

Italian. She knows it very well and I am beginning to stumble along pretty well with it already though not very far in a day. The pleasant days we go out to walk and to drive and I like Interlaken better every day. This morning the Grangers came for [us corrected ] to go to drive, but I wasn’t up, and so A. F. went off with them by herself. They were up here first and we had a very nice time. They are such charming people, two girls and their mother, & we met them the other day coming down from Luzern & have seen a good

 [ Page 3 ]

deal of them since. Mrs. Fields has always been fond of the eldest girl. They are nieces of Mrs. Winthrop and she has been here too until yesterday. Poor Adele Mayer* looks to me as if she wouldn’t live a great while. They were both very nice- poor things! They started yesterday to drive to Chamouny* and it must have poured most of the day for it certainly did here, though people say it often is bad weather in one of these deep valleys and fine weather in the next. You never saw anything so lovely as the little farms are high up

 [ Page 4 ]

on the sides of the mountains. The little bright green fields are such a contrast to the black pines and gray rocks. I don’t see how the people get up and down for some of them are nearly as high as the sky, ^and look as if they were hung on a wall.^ It is so lovely looking out of the window this morning, and where we were at breakfast we had to be looking out every minute. I like breakfast time better than any time in the day,^ for once in my life!^ We have it up here and always the same things -- coffee that is more delicious than any I ever saw and delightful bread and butter and honey. Every body eats a great deal of "Swiss honey" which is clear, and has the most delicious flavor you can imagine. Then we have a big dish of plums

 [ Page 5 ]

some being greengages of a description![so written]  and some being little and very yellow and some being large and blue. We have no end of flowers and it is so pleasant that I hate to think of going away though we shall be here two weeks longer I think and then travel a little in Switzerland before we go down to the Italian Lakes, and from there to Venice. We shall be there about the fourth or fifth of September and I really long to see Venice. Miss Adams is very pleasant, but she seems more like Mrs. Fields’s aunt than

 [ Page 6 ]

her sister.* She has so many ^amusing^* stories to tell of her German life and we all have great fun sometimes. She is quite lame and she likes to go out to walk early in the day so she and Liza* parade over into the village and come home with no end of plunder and news. The shops here are filled with carved things and jewelry made of the Swiss crystals, the amethysts &c.* I always thought the carvings cost little or nothing, but it is quite the contrary, though somebody told me you can get everything much cheaper at Lauterbrunnen and some of the higher-up villages.

 [ Page 7 ]

Sister has every account to give of remarkable things she has to eat, and one of the table d’hote dinners is too funny for anything. It takes forever to serve it, there are so many courses, and you have a course of beans and a course of cauliflower and a course of little cakes and a course of chops with a sauce or gravy [ deleted word ] which is indeed a mystery, and there are nice flaky tarts stuffed with lobster with a seasoning that makes you cry for more. Dear me I am always wanting to tell you things, and then

 [ Page 8 ]

when I come to write I forget them. Sister must now rise and shine and take her walks abroad, so no more at present. I will answer Carrie’s* letter next ^time^{.} I wish you would tell me if she wanted any wide Roman sash -- I can’t remember, and do tell me over again if there was anything you wanted, for I should be so sorry if I forget. Mrs. Fields would send you a great deal of love if she were {here}. She said "dear Mary" the other day, all out of clear sky! and demanded whether I always sent her love. If you tell me any more about Princess* you will see me come riding down from the

 [ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 5 ]

pasture bareback. They put sleigh bells on all the Swiss horses, and there is such a jingling you would think it was midwinter. So no more at present from the Queen of Sheby.*


Notes

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

Grangers ...  Mrs. Winthrop ...  Adele Mayer:  The identities of these persons is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Chamouny: This location is mysterious.  Almost certainly they did not go for a day's outing to Chamonix in France, which is about 250 km from Interlaken.  Assistance is welcome.

Miss Adams:  Which of Annie Fields's sisters joins them in parts of their traveling in Europe is not yet certain.  More likely would be her unmarried oldest sister, Sarah Holland Adams (1823-?), who had moved to Europe after her mother's death in 1877, where she settled in Germany and became as translator into English of the works of Hermann Grimm.  If Jewett is using the normal Victorian form of address, the "Miss Adams" would be the oldest unmarried sister in a family.
    Somewhat less likely is another unmarried older sister, Elizabeth (1825-?), a painter making her home in Baltimore, MD, who had studied a number of years in France and Italy through the 1870s.  See Rita Gollin, Annie Adams Fields (2002) p. 13. 

amusing:  Jewett appears to have first inserted "amusing" in the fold between pages 6 and 7, then deleted it and inserted it instead in the left margin of page 6, just before "stories."

Liza:  Personal servant of Annie Fields, who accompanied the pair on this trip.

Swiss crystals, the amethysts &cWikipedia says that quartz or "rock crystals" are common near alpine glaciers throughout Europe and Asia.  Carving such crystals has long been an income source for those living in the Alps.

Carrie's:  Caroline Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

Princess: A Jewett family horse.  See Blanchard, Sarah Orne Jewett (2002), p. 117.

Queen of Sheby: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.




John Greenleaf Whittier to SOJ

Oak Knoll Danvers
8 Mo. 17 1882



My dear Sarah Jewett,

    My great pleasure in reading thy letter from "Norroway over the Foam,"* was marred by thy reflection that it was written when thee should have been resting.  I am afraid that you work too hard and see too much, and, in addition to this, that you write your kind letters home, when you should be asleep.  Of course, we dearly love to get them.

[ Page 2 ]
 
I wish I could have sat with you on the cliff-side of Lynton, that Sabbath day* looking off over the immeasurable sea!  or driven with you over the lovely Ex-moor, or rambled with you through the venerable classic [streets ? ] of Oxford,* and where are you now! -- Wherever you are be thankful you are not in the more than tropical


[ Page 3 ]

heat of our NE. summer.  We are roasted and done in the intolerable sun.  But we are glad to feel that the spell is broken.  Yesterday we had a shower and anybody & everything is happier for it.

    I found a cool place for a fortnight at the Asquam House,* in the midst of the three Asquam lakes in Holderness, N.H.  The outlook is rarely beautiful -- water on three sides & mountain horizon all round.

[ Page 4 ]

Unfortunately I returned too soon, to encounter the hottest weather of the season & have suffered in consequence. For four nights in succession I could not sleep, and I thought of going to Elizth[ so written] Phelps'* place in Gloucester, and watching the stars with her!

    My brother's illness continues.*  He is about to resign his place in the U.S. Naval Office, and I am studying how to make him as comfortable as possible.
   
    Let me hear from thee but only write a few words to tell how & where you are. 

With love to dear Mrs F.* always affectionately,

   John G Whittier


Notes


8 Mo. 17:  Whittier uses the Quaker dating system, giving the day and the number of the month.

"Norroway over the Foam": During their first European trip together in 1882, Jewett and Fields visited Mrs. Ole Bull in Norway. See Correspondents. The quotation is from an English ballad, "Sir Patrick Spence."

cliff-side of Lynton: Jewett and Fields stayed at the Royal Castle Hotel in Lynton, on the north coast of Devon near the beginning of July 1882.  They were touring Oxford about a week later.

Asquam House:  Now called Squam Lake, Lake Asquam is "in the Lakes Region of central New Hampshire, United States, south of the White Mountains, straddling the borders of Grafton, Carroll, and Belknap counties. The largest town center on the lake is Holderness."  Richard Cary notes of Holderness: "A summer resort village in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Whittier was staying at a new hotel on the peak of Shepard Hill which afforded a magnificent view of the several lakes in its vicinity. The scene inspired his poems "The Hill-Top" and "Storm on Lake Asquam."

Phelps ... Gloucester:  Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (Ward).  See Correspondents.  She had a summer home in the seaside town of Gloucester, MA.

brother's illness:  Whittier's brother, Matthew, died on 7 January 1883.

Mrs. F:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the South Berwick Public Library, South Berwick, ME.  Transcription by John Richardson.  Annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 
Interlaken
28 August

Dear Mary

      I wish you could have seen and heard the laugh we had over your last letter and its comment on the Norway pleasuring. It was so funny about the departed Normans coming to return our call! We have had two or three rainy days and have not been out much except for little walks. Last night it really seemed fallish, and I suppose it will soon be getting cold here for though we are in a valley it is a good way above the sea, as you will know by strawberries still being in season though I dare say they are brought down from the little farms higher up on the mountains. You don’t know how pretty it is to see them, with the houses peeping down. Some of them stand on such steep

 [ Page 2 ]

places that I should think if a baby fell over the doorstep it wouldn’t stop rolling till it got down to Interlaken. Don’t you remember the little Swiss cottage Carrie* used to have in a box? The houses look just like it, and are so picturesque and pretty, and it is charming the way the country people’s lives go on just as [as repeated ] they  it has [so written] for so many years, in spite of the swarm of strangers from every country that pass through here every summer. The other day we were driving and heard the sound of bells and looked up the road to see a great flock of goats coming, such beauties with their jingling little bells and brown and white coats and sharp little black horns. The people keep them instead of cows and drive them to

 [ Page 3 ]

pasture, but I had not happened to see a whole flock coming home.  [Together corrected ] there must have been a hundred. We leave here on Wednesday and shall only be in Switzerland two days longer after that, as we reach Italy Friday if all goes well. Sunday is my birthday and we shall spend it in Milan and go to Venice on Monday. I am crazy to see Venice! I can hardly wait to get there. We go over the St. Gothard Pass, and the scenery is magnificent, so every body says. We shall not go over it by carriage as Mrs. Fields did before, but most of the way by train, which gives much the same view and is much quicker, though one tunnel is nine miles long! We shall spend Thursday night at Andermatt, on

 [ Page 4 ]

top of the tunnel,* and then go down and go through. It must be delightful, the change from the bleak mountains to the lovely Italian valleys, all in one day, but I would rather tell you all this after I have seen it, instead of expatiating beforehand. Wednesday we travel part of the day by steamer and the rest by diligence which will be great fun. Miss Adams* leaves us that night to go to Lucerne and we shall miss her very much. She is very nice. She spent all last winter in Italy so of course she doesn’t care to go right back again to travel hurriedly, as we shall have to do. We shall make the longest stay in Rome, but we can have a full month and see a good deal in that time. I was

 [ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 1 ]

Sorry to hear just now from Cora that Mrs. Mary Barrell is sick. I should feel dreadfully if any thing happens to her. Mrs. Fields* sends love to you. So give my love to all, Your loving sister

             Sarah


Notes

Carrie:  Caroline Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

St. Gothard Pass ... Andermatt on top of the tunnel:  According to Wikipedia, Andermatt, Switzerland is a crossroads town, connected to four passes through the Alps.  Before the opening of the St. Gotthard railway tunnel n 1881, the town was a popular resort.  Building the tunnel under the town took Andermatt off the main travel route.

Miss Adams:  Which of Annie Fields's sisters joins them in parts of their traveling in Europe is not yet certain.  More likely would be her unmarried oldest sister, Sarah Holland Adams (1823-?), who had moved to Europe after her mother's death in 1877, where she settled in Germany and became as translator into English of the works of Hermann Grimm.  If Jewett is using the normal Victorian form of address, the "Miss Adams" would be the oldest unmarried sister in a family.
    Somewhat less likely is another unmarried older sister, Elizabeth (1825-?), a painter making her home in Baltimore, MD, who had studied a number of years in France and Italy through the 1870s.  See Rita Gollin, Annie Adams Fields (2002) p. 13. 

Cora: Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Mary Barrell:  Mary Barrell (c. 1804 - June 6, 1889), lived in what is now the Sayward-Wheeler House in York Harbor, ME. for much of the 19th century.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Lugano
3rd September

  Dear Mary

      I am here on our way to Milan, in a most beautiful place on one of the Italian Lakes. We had a delightful journey over the Alps, and beautiful weather. We came ^to Alpnach first &^ to Bellinzona the first ^second^ night from Lucerne, and it is such a quaint place & the first where we heard

 [ Page 2 ]

the people speaking Italian which seemed very nice. I never heard any thing more lovely than the sound of the bells that the cattle and goats wore round their necks, and they were always going through the streets in flocks =* we thought it was some of the peasants music at first and rushed to the window to listen. It is really worth while to

 [ Page 3 ]

come over the St. Gothard Pass if only to see the engineering of the railroad which is perfectly marvellous. To look upon those enormous mountains you would not believe that cars could ever climb  them. There is one tunnel nine miles long and any number of shorter ones, but the cars are well lighted and you don’t mind them so very much. When you come out there are the most superb views you can imagine. We were sorry to

 [ Page 4

leave Miss Adams* in Lucerne but she met some friends which made it pleasanter. We shall get to either Como or Milan tonight and I shall have enough to tell you in my first letter. It is like midsummer here after our thinking it was getting along in the fall at Interlaken! The grapes are getting ripe, & there is delicious fruit everywhere of every kind, even figs which I don’t care a great deal about. Mrs. Fields sends love. I shall get my letters at Venice. Much love from

      Sarah*

[ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 1]

Sister’s birthday! She gets gifts later, in Italy from Mrs. Fields but Liza* gave me such a pretty handkerchief that she finished weaving. She found a better work bag in Interlaken with this in it. I must

[ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 2]

tell you that Mrs. Fields has taken to calling me Pinny Lawson now because I must be a child [deleted word] of Sam’s. You know Mrs. Stowe’s Sam Lawson!*

 [ Page 5 ]

Milan, Monday --  I must add a word or two to my letter which didn’t get posted. We have come down to the Lake of Como today & it was lovely, and we have been to the great Cathedral of Milan just before dark but that is too beautiful and too big! to write about now -- Tomorrow we go to Venice but not until we see some famous pictures. The Last Supper &c.*

 [ Page 6 ]

I never saw any thing like Italy. The olive trees and fig trees are growing every where, and great oleanders all in full bloom as big as lilacs in the gardens. I want to tell you every thing and to have you see every thing!

 [ Page 7 ]

  I must go to bed now, so good night with much love,

     From the Queen*

 

  Notes

=:  Jewett occasionally uses an = sign where one might expect a dash.

Miss Adams:  Which of Annie Fields's sisters joins them in parts of their traveling in Europe is not yet certain.  More likely would be her unmarried oldest sister, Sarah Holland Adams (1823-?), who had moved to Europe after her mother's death in 1877, where she settled in Germany and became as translator into English of the works of Hermann Grimm.  If Jewett is using the normal Victorian form of address, the "Miss Adams" would be the oldest unmarried sister in a family.
    Somewhat less likely is another unmarried older sister, Elizabeth (1825-?), a painter making her home in Baltimore, MD, who had studied a number of years in France and Italy through the 1870s.  See Rita Gollin, Annie Adams Fields (2002) p. 13. 

Mrs. Fields … Liza:   Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. Mrs. Fields's personal Irish maid, frequent¬ly mentioned by Miss Jewett in her letters home on the 1882 trip.  See Correspondents.

Sarah:  This letter is in pencil through this signature, then switches to ink for the final two pages.

Pinny Lawson … Mrs. Stowe’s Sam Lawson: This appears to be the first use of a nickname for herself that Jewett and Fields used the rest of Jewett's life.  Jewett suggests here that the name derives from Sam Lawson, a rural raconteur in two works of fiction by the American author, Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896):  Oldtown Folks (1869) and Oldtown Fireside Stories   (1872).

the Last Supper:   Wikipedia says that "The Last Supper" (c. 1496), a mural by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), in the refectory of the Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan, is one of the most famous paintings in the world.  It depicts the Christian gospel story (John 13.21) of Jesus's last meal with his disciples.

the Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

  Venice 6 September*

  Dear Mary

      I never enjoyed an evening in all my life better than I did this. You know how I have been longing to get here, but Venice is more beautiful than any thing I ever dreamed of, and really it is more like a dream or a story than an actual every-day city. We got here last night about eight after a long hot dusty ride in the cars from Milan. I saw some beautiful pictures there in the morning -- the Last Supper,* for one, and though I never have cared at all for any copy of it that I ever saw the original is wonderfully

 [ Page 2 ]

lovely the faces are all living, though they are so defaced by time. You never can guess at it, by seeing a copy. That is the real satisfaction of coming abroad =*  you can’t think what a difference the touch of the master’s own hand makes between the picture and its copy. Sometimes there will be five copies for sale near these great pictures and they will be correct enough in one way, but like a wax flower beside a real one after all.

      "You ought to have been here to give one of your yips! for me when I got out of the car ^last night^ and instead of scurrying after

 [ Page 3 ]

the hotel omnibus or a cab to have the porter of the hotel ask if it were Madame Fields* and march us down the station steps into a gondola. It had been so hot all day and we were about as tired and dusty as we could be, but there we sat on the cushions and waited for the men to bring our baggage and the salt sea air was just cool enough to make us comfortable without being chilly. There was a great flock of gondolas with red and white lights all about us and it was such fun to hear the men chaff each

 [ Page 4 ]

other. I really learned a good deal of Italian while I was at Interlaken so I can catch some words here and there. Mrs. Fields always can get along every where we go -- only in Dutch, and you don’t know what a difference it makes in our comfort =  We got the trunks and started off down the canal and came at last to the hotel, which is the nicest one yet, we think. Then I found your letter and I was glad enough to get it, for though I heard a week ago it seemed a good deal longer. It was that nice letter ^written^

[ Page 5 ]

just the time Harry Barber had come, and we both enjoyed it so much. There was a lovely long one from Miss Woolsey, and such a dear long one to A.F. and me from Thy Friend,* one of the most beautiful letters I ever read.

             Today we didn’t get up until late and then we went to St. Mark’s and Sister ate two ices & A.F. ate one at Florian’s, the famous café,* and we trotted all about the square. St. Marks is so rich and splendid, all mosaic and red and gold. Milan Cathedral was so splendidly high and such a huge world

 [ Page 6 ]

[ deleted word ]  of a place and I saw it so lately, that this seemed small and I had to stay in it some time before I could really take in the magnificence of it, but I did, in good season too. I know you would like it, and the great column with the winged lion on top, and the high bell tower and all the rest! The pigeons fly about in clouds and every thing makes you sure you are in Italy. As for the shops, they bewitch you, and are perfectly fascinating. I do wish photographs were given away! I don’t mean little ones, but the large one [ so written ]

 [ Page 7 ]

which are really so well worth having -- They are cheaper here than in England, but are apt to be a good deal when they are [big corrected ] and handsome{.}

           -- We came home and ate no end of grapes and peaches -- the grapes are like honey and you can buy enough to be 'make' (wine of) for half a franc or ^half^ a lira which is the same. Then we rested until half past five and took a gondola and were gone until nearly eight out to the Lido across the harbor, and up the Grand Canal.* There was the most beautiful sunset, and you never

 [ Page 8 ]

saw such colors! And after a while* the lamps of the gondolas were all lit and they went about like fireflies on the water. After we had come a little way up the Grand Canal there were some people in a boat singing Venetian songs and I thought I should die of it. There was a guitar, and they sang and sang and it broke my heart to come away from them, only we are not going away from here until next week, it being so hot every where else and so lovely here, and we are going out in a gondola every night of our lives.

              I did wish Mother was here to-night, and you and Taddy*

 [ Up the left margin and overwritten down the top of page 8 ]

It pays a thousand times over for all the journey here to have a day [in?] Venice. Ever so much love from

     Sarah

[ Up the left margin of page 4 ]

  I don’t believe you got all of my Norway letters, did you?

 

Notes

6 September:  Jewett's script is unclear.  She may have written 5 September.

the Last Supper:   Wikipedia says that "The Last Supper" (c. 1496), a mural by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), in the refectory of the Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan, is one of the most famous paintings in the world.  It depicts the Christian gospel story (John 13.21) of Jesus's last meal with his disciples.

=:  Jewett occasionally uses an = sign where one might expect a dash.

Madame Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

Harry Barber … Woolsey … Thy Friend:  The identity of Harry Barber is unknown.  It appears he is a visitor in South Berwick.  Assistance is welcome.  
    Miss Woolsey is probably Sarah Chauncey Woolsey (1835-1905), who wrote children's literature under the name of Susan Coolidge.  
    Thy friend is John Greenleaf Whittier.  See Correspondents.

Florian’s, the famous caféWikipedia says: "Caffè Florian is a coffee house situated in the Procuratie Nuove of Piazza San Marco, Venice. It was established in 1720, and is the oldest coffee house in continuous operation (with Café Procope in Paris)."

Grand Canal: It is unclear whether Jewett has capitalized these words here, though she does later in the letter.

a while:  Jewett may have written "awhile."

Taddy:   Other letters indicate that Taddy is female, but no other information about her is yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to John Greenleaf Whittier

 

 !Venice! 9 September [1882] *          

My dear friend[,]   What do you think of an A. F.* who has just finished her breakfast (and a very good breakfast it was) at ten minutes after ten?  She was once famous for early rising; it is the result of keeping company with the greatest sleep-head in North America!  It is a shame to be so late in Venice for there are so many lovely things to see and to do; but the truth is, we were out on the Grand Canal until late yesterday and had to take our rest afterward.  We have had the best time in the world here.  I think I must send you a little back chapter of Milan first and tell you that we spend Monday night there, and saw the marvelous Last Supper* and the huge, high-arched great world of a Cathedral, and some splendid pictures at the Brera* -- then on Tuesday we took the train at noon and were until eight O’clock coming here in the blazing heat and dust.  But imagine our joy when we felt a great wind of salt air blow into the car, and in a few minutes afterward were in a gondola swinging about on the water with red and white lights, like fire-flies all about us, waiting for our boxes to be brought down the station steps.  There never was anything like it, you know!  And we found the hotel the best we have got on the Continent, and we said at once that we would stay three days longer than our plan allowed.  When we came upstairs there was the best letter from you that you ever sent flying, and we were gladder to get it than you are ever going to imagine.

            I do wish you were here.  You should see how pleasant this room is and you should laugh at T. L.* who stands in the middle of the window and throws peachstones into the canal as if they were flowers to her subjects.

            Now this gives me three ‘heads’ for a discourse.  T. L. and the peachstones and the subjects not of T. L. but of Queen Margaret of Italy* who came to Venice yesterday in the most obliging way.

            T. L. stands for a very good name I gave Mrs. A. F. long ago, and which I mean to tell you when I get home, it being a great secret.  As for the peach stones, they made me think of all the peaches and grapes and figs which are just now ripe and it is worth while to come to Italy just to see the fruit and eat it.  As we came over the ‘great Lombard plain’ on Tuesday the vines were fairly loaded down with blue and green clusters.  It is all very well for people to talk about Italy in winter, but it is really a great pleasure to be seeing it at the vintage time.  We came very near the battle field of Solperino,* and the fortifications are all along the line of the railway dismantled and grass-grown.

            We have spent a great deal of time in gondolas.  It is perfectly beautiful to be out late in the afternoon and at sunset, and the first night we came we went over to the Lido,* not going into the old Armenian convent* but only walking up the shore for awhile and thinking a great deal about Shelley and Byron* who also liked that shore.  The gondolier was sent to get his supper at a little shop and we walked to and fro and the sunset began to flame out more and more until nobody but Turner* ever thought of its like, and all the harbour between us and Venice was smooth as glass and the bell towers and domes caught the light, and were built of pale fires themselves.  All the way back to the city, this color was slowly fading and we watched it as we went along -- and at last as we came in to the Grand Canal the gondola lights were out again like fire-flies and some people in boats with coloured lanterns were singing Venetian songs, and at that I thought nobody had ever had such a good time in this world, and the stars were bright and the people looked down from the windows, and it was enough to made you cry!

            We have been to see St. Mark’s and the Doges’ palace and no end of churches, for the sake of their pictures chiefly, though they are full of treasures.  And last night the Queen came to Venice as I told you and we went scooting through the side canals a good deal to get the best place on the great one and succeeded in getting caught at last in a great snarl and crowd of gondolas and being close to the royal gondola as it rushed by and others after it with officers in gay uniforms and fluttering plumes. All the boats followed in procession and the bells were ringing and red lights and fireworks going off and people on the shore cheering and it was something like the old days only the great palaces held back their heads as if they meant to say it was all very dull compared to things they had seen.  To-day the flags are flying everywhere and it was very gay and bright, but whereever you look you can only think of the grandeur and pride of the old Venice and the fading colours that the vine brings out are better than the new ones of the flags and the brilliancy she tries to put on.  We both send love to you and wish so much that we could see you.  Yours always lovingly, Sarah

This is a feather that belonged to one of the pigeons in St. Mark’s Square. You do not know how well we [ transcription ends with one unreadable word, possibly  "have."


Notes

Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Whittier] [1882] [1892].

1882:  Jewett recounts several of the events of this letter in another to Mary Rice Jewett from Venice on 6 September 1882.

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

the Last Supper:   Wikipedia says that "The Last Supper" (c. 1496), a mural by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), in the refectory of the Convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan, is one of the most famous paintings in the world.  It depicts the Christian gospel story (John 13.21) of Jesus's last meal with his disciples.

the Brera:  In Milan's Palazzo Brera is the Pinacoteca di Brera, an art gallery.

T. L.:  As Jewett explains, this is a "secret" nickname Jewett has given to Fields.  As of this writing, only a few instances of her using it are known and its meaning remains a mystery, though it superficially resembles a nickname Fields has given Jewett: P.L. standing for Pinny Lawson, which connects Jewett with Harriet Beecher Stowe's raconteur from Oldtown Fireside Stories (1881).

Queen Margaret of ItalyPrincess Margherita of Savoy (1851-1926) became Queen consort of Italy when she married the king, Umberto I in January 1878.

battle field of Solperino:   The Battle of Solferino took place in June of 1859, during the Second Italian War of Independence, near the village of Solferino in the then Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia.

Lido ... the old Armenian convent: The Lido of Venice is a long sand-bar beach across the lagoon, southeast of the city.  A small island off the Lido is San Lazzaro degli Ameni, (St. Lazarus of the Amenians).  Begun as a leper colony, the island became an Armenian Catholic monastery in the early 18th century.

Shelley and Byron: The British Romantic poets, Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) and George Gordon Lord Byron (1788-1824) were together in Venice in 1818.

Turner:  The British painter, Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851), is remembered as "the painter of light." He spent a good deal of time in Venice early in his life.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

  Venice

11 September

  Dear Mary     I have had the loveliest time in the world here, and the best of weather. We have been out on the water the greater part of every day and evening and it is quite breaking our hearts to go away. The other night the Queen* came to Venice very obligingly! And we were in the thick of the crowd of gondolas you may be sure!! All the gondolas followed hers down the Grand Canal and there were fireworks and all the bells were ringing and the people cheering and it was almost

  [ Page 2 ]

like taking a sight at Venice in the days of its glory. We fairly bumped against the Queen’s boat. We got so close to her and I was very glad to see her! She is a very handsome young woman and the people seem very fond of her and ever since she came to the palace the flags are flying all over the city and make it look brighter and gay. We have been in the Doges Palace and in ever so many churches and the pictures and carvings are beautiful as Venice itself! This morning we

  [ Page 3 ]

are going to Florence to be there a few days, and then to Rome. I send you some little photographs* which I think you will like to look at. They are just big enough to remind me of the places. Mrs. Fields* sends love, and I will write again as soon as possible after I get to Florence.

     Yours lovingly    Sarah

Liza* says Venice is terrible splendid -- but as for those Germans they have no talk at all; it is the chuckling of ducks!  [ deleted word ]

 

Notes

the Queen:   Wikipedia says that Princess Margherita of Savoy (Margherita Maria Teresa Giovanna) 1851 - 1926), was the Queen consort of the Kingdom of Italy by marriage to King Umberto I.  She became queen when he succeeded to the throne of Italy in 1878.

little photographs:  Jewett indicates that she has included photographs with this letter.  In the Houghton Library collection from which this letter comes (see note below), there is a set of three photographs, though they do not appear adjacent to this letter.  They are items 147-152 in this collection.  Though in 2016 the Houghton identifies all three as Venetian scenes, in fact only two of these are of Venice.

Venice 1

Handwritten on the back of this photo:  Pillars by St.Mark [in pen]
    L. Giovanni D'acri [in pencil]
Houghton identification: Pillars of St. Mark's photograph.

  Vanice 2


Handwritten on the back of this photo:  Canale Grande [in pencil]
    23 [circled in pencil, probably in another hand]
   Grand Canal [in ink]

Houghton identification: Grand Canal Photograph.

  "Venice" 3

Penciled on the back of this photograph:  The place I put a mark by is one of our parlor windows ! ! !
[See the X next to the second story balcony of the New Inn.]

Circled at right angle below Jewett's note in pencil is 23, probably in another hand.

Houghton identification: [Venice hillside street with donkey and New Inn] photograph.

Almost certainly, this scene is not in Venice, which lacks hillsides this steep.  Though there is a now a New Inn in Rome, it also is not on a steep hill.  That the sign is in English suggests the scene is from an English-speaking country.

            In an earlier letter (2 July), Jewett reports staying at the New Inn in Clovelly (Devon) and photos on-line suggest that this is the New Inn of this photo.

Compare this image of "The New Inn and street, Clovelly, Devon," available courtesy of Magnoliabox.com.

New Inn

Mrs. Fields ... Liza:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F. Mrs. Fields's personal Irish maid, frequent¬ly mentioned by Miss Jewett in her letters home on the 1882 trip.  See Correspondents

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

  Florence 14 September

  Dear Mary

      I am really quite homesick to go back to Venice, it was so lovely there, and it has been bad weather in Florence ever since we came. Mrs. Fields* has not been quite well and I am thinking seriously about not going any further south. We are not going to Naples now anyway, but we do not mean to give up Rome if we can help it. The air was so bracing and fine in Venice that it makes the inland towns seem close, though today is much cooler. It is lovely all about Florence

 [ Page 2 ]

and we have had a lovely drive out to San Miniato and Bellos-Guardo.*  Miss Preston* is here and is very pleasant, and we have seen her twice, and also the Princess d’Istria* who is more than nice! I never saw such a welcome as she gave Mrs. Fields. I thought she never would get done hugging her! Her house is lovely, and she gave us the most beautiful flowers the day we were there. Florence is full of pictures and one needs to be here six months instead of six days, to see the half of them. I like the olive

 [ Page 3 ]

groves on the hills as well as anything, you don’t know how beautiful they are -- something like willows but even softer looking, and when the wind blows they turn over and show their silver undersides. Sister saw nothing but mulberry trees from Milan to Venice and from Venice here and has ceased to wonder where all the silk comes from, silk things are about as high here as anywhere else in spite of every thing. I suppose because the manufactured goods have to come from a long distance. I have not said a word about the beautiful old churches

 [ Page 4 ]

and bell towers here, all built of black and white marble. The baptistery is very fine, and I saw yesterday the famous bronze doors of it but just as we were looking at them the rain began to pour down and we had to scud --  I am just as sleepy as I can be though it isn't very late, and so I will close and say "to be continued".----

  With love to all       Sarah


  Notes

Mrs. Fields:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

San Miniato and Bellos-Guardo:  Almost certainly, Jewett refers to San Miniato al Monte, a hilltop basilica in Florence.  Bellosguardo, in this instance, almost certainly is one of the hills forming the basin of the Arno river valley, in which Florence is situated.

Miss Preston: Harriet Waters Preston.  See Correspondents.

Princess d’IstriaWikipedia says: "Dora d'Istria (January 22, 1828, Bucharest - November 17, 1888, Florence) was the pen-name of duchess Helena Koltsova-Massalskaya. Born Elena Ghica, she was a Wallachian-born Romantic writer and feminist of Romanian-Albanian descent....
    "She published a number of works that not only showed her proficiency in Romanian, Italian, German, French, Latin, Ancient and Modern Greek, and Russian, but also her knowledge of scientific topics, her liberal views on religious and political topics, as well as a talent for presenting her points. Her general world view was cosmopolitan, but she also worked hard to bring the resources and technologies available in Western Europe to Eastern Europe, and worked towards the emancipation of her gender."
    During the last decade of her life, she resided mainly in Florence.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Rome 18 September

  Dear Mary

      When I wrote Rome just now at the head of the letter it seemed so funny that I should be here that I stopped to look at it! We seem to have fallen on a rainy time in Italy, yet when the sun comes out it is most lovely, the sky is so clear and blue. Neither of us felt well in Florence; the hotel was dark and damp and too near the Arno.* I suppose you will say we took a strange cure, when we started for Rome of all places! at this time of the year, but we thought we would try it. Some things about Florence were charming. I saw ever so many lovely pictures and churches, and then it was nice to see Miss Preston*

 [ Page 2 ]

And the Princess* was too funny and delightful for anything. I should think she had just hopped out of a novel. One day she came to [deleted words] ask us out to drive in the Cascine (which is a lovely great park just out of Florence)* and you never saw such majesty as it was! She had such funny old man-servants and all the pomp and ceremony you can imagine. She is very well known in Florence and from the moment she made her appearance the way the hotel people scuttled round was amazing. They had been scuttling to a proper extent before but there was nothing like it afterward and I told Mrs. Fields* there was no knowing how much longer our bill would be! -- I found some

 [ Page 3 ]

of her cards before we came away and I must send you one for it is quite imposing. We were going to see a good deal more of Her Highness sooner than we had planned.

             -- We meant to go to Perugia (as Mrs. F. remembered it was a lovely old place) and spend Sunday, but when we reached the station we found we could only get as far as Arezzo, 55 miles -- [ deleted word ] so we set sail for Arezzo and were five hours on the way as there had been a grand review of Italian troops and they were all coming back that day and so delayed all the other trains. When we had got to our journey’s end we found it such a funny

 [ Page 4 ]

little old city on the top of a hill with a very old cathedral in which were some of the most beautiful glass windows I ever saw. There was more real country-town life than we have had much chance to see before and we were in a most entertaining old hotel. Altogether we quite enjoyed Arezzo. They had just been dedicating a new statue and the whole town was hung with flags and garlands.

          --  Yesterday we started for Rome from there, and got here between three and four. It has been a damp showery day and we could only be out driving for two hours but in that time we went both to St. Peter’s and the Colosseum. St. Peter’s looks, as it really is, the most

 [ Page 5 ]

  enormous building ^church^ in the world. It is six or [seven written over several?]  hundred feet long, some books say much more than that and the great roof and dome of it seem about as high as the sky. It breaks your neck to look up at it! It isn't half so beautiful as the Cathedral at Milan, for the inside decorations are tawdry, but nothing can really spoil the great proportions of it or make it anything but the greatest church in the world in size! As for the Colosseum I never had any idea of the grandeur of it, and the sight of it is something I never shall forget. St. Peter’s with all its statues and colored marbles is a very cheap thing compared with the wonderful great ruin, with its empty arches

 [ Page 6 ]

and crumbling seats. It used to hold 87,000 people; wasn’t that a circus indeed! We shall only be here a few days and then when we leave Rome we shall be all the time going home, as this is the farthest point of the journey. We had a splendid mail waiting here. I had four letters from you all beautiful lettys,* and so full of pleasant things. I am going to have Mary Harriet* make me a visit when I get back and turn you out of the house. Give my love to Taddy and tell her I will pen her a line soon in return for her part of the mail ^( -- two lettys)^ and that I will get the right gowns when I get to Paris. I hope you and Uncle William* had a nice time up the lake. Love to him and to all the rest. I hope Mrs. Ann is a friend

 [Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 6]

to Roger* -- !!!!!! (Raj-jers) Your sister eats sights of figs, there are kinds of figs green and purple and she can eat most of the green. No more at this time from the Queen.*

 [Up left margin of page 1 ]

you needn’t write me after the 10th of October.

 
Notes

Arno: The river that flows through Florence.

Miss Preston: Harriet Waters Preston.  See Correspondents.

the Princess:  Probably, Jewett refers to the Princess d’Istria.  Wikipedia says: "Dora d'Istria (January 22, 1828, Bucharest - November 17, 1888, Florence) was the pen-name of duchess Helena Koltsova-Massalskaya. Born Elena Ghica, she was a Wallachian-born Romantic writer and feminist of Romanian-Albanian descent....
    "She published a number of works that not only showed her proficiency in Romanian, Italian, German, French, Latin, Ancient and Modern Greek, and Russian, but also her knowledge of scientific topics, her liberal views on religious and political topics, as well as a talent for presenting her points. Her general world view was cosmopolitan, but she also worked hard to bring the resources and technologies available in Western Europe to Eastern Europe, and worked towards the emancipation of her gender."
    During the last decade of her life, she resided mainly in Florence.

Cascine:   Wikipedia says: "The Parco delle Cascine (Cascine Park) is a monumental and historical park in the city of Florence." 

Mrs. Fields:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

lettys:  Jewett often uses this alternate word for "letters."

Mary Harriet: The identity of this person is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Taddy:   This letter indicates that Taddy -- mentioned in several other letters -- is female, but no other information about her is yet known. Otherwise, one might guess that Jewett refers to her then 3-year-old nephew, Theodore Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.   Assistance is welcome.

Uncle William:  William Durham Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Ann is a friend to Roger:  Ann was a Jewett family employee; Roger was a Jewett dog.

the Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 
Genoa 25 September



Dear Mary

     I really didn’t have a chance to write you again in Rome, for I got tired and went to bed so early every night! I am glad we are away from there it seemed so hot and close, but I am thankful that I really have been there. Here in Genoa it is lovely. We have such a beautiful view of the harbour from our big front windows and the Mediterranean all colours of the rainbow but chiefly bluer than any blue in the world. All day yesterday

 [ Page 2 ]

it was lovely. We left Rome the day before and came to Pisa, and yesterday morning we came drove all about and I went up into the leaning tower and was very much afraid that it would tumble over on me as every body else has been for several hundred years! That and the cathedral and the baptistery all stand together and are all mosaic and white marble and look so beautiful against the bright Italian sky. Most of yesterday and the day

 [ Page 3 ]

before we were within sight of the sea and it was very comfortable in the cars. We shall have three long days journeys between here and Paris and I wish they were over with, but we shall stop every night which will rest us. [Only corrected] four weeks now before I start for home and though nobody ever enjoyed ‘Europe’ more, you don’t know how glad I shall be. I really don’t want to spend the winter though so many people prophesied that I should. I shall be so glad to see you [ deleted word ] and all my friends, and to go on with my writing and my own affairs. I can’t [ deleted word ]

 [ Page 4 ]

imagine how people get discontented and want to come back. It seems to me I have been growing fonder of home all the time and I have had twice as good a time here this summer as most people have, I know! I like the dome of Boston state house* better than the dome of St. Peters, if it is smaller! and Agamenticus* is a very good little hill if it isn’t as high as the Alps. But (not to joke any more) I think one can learn and enjoy a great deal more in some ways here than in America, and I have tried to get all the advantages that I could. It was splendid

 [ Page 5 ]

to see the old statues in Rome and I think there is no way to study history like going to these oldest cities. Seeing other countries makes you understand your own better ---

     -- What a good time you must have had up the lake! The last letter I had was just as you were starting for York and I hope that trip was a cheerful one too. I had such a laugh over [Shual ? ] , but I think she is a great loss! I am afraid you will think I might have written a better letter, but I will bid you all good evening because I am quite tired, and I will have every particular next time.

             From your loving Sarah

Notes

dome of the Boston state house:  The Massachusetts state capital building.

Agamenticus: Mount Agamenticus, east of Jewett's home town, South Berwick, ME and visible from high points in and near the town is 692 feet above sea level.

Shual:  This transcription is uncertain and the name unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Paris 29 September

  Dear Mary

      I have much as [even or ever ? ]* got to Paris so you needn’t expect to hear anything about it, and you might make believe I wrote the letter on the road. We came right up from Turin without stopping at Dijon as we first planned and are so relieved that the long journey is over. We had a splendid day for coming across the Alps and through the Mont Cenis tunnel* (as if weather made any difference in that!) The mountains were covered with snow and the leaves were changed (I mean the lower mountains which were bare

 [ Page 2 ]

when we were in Switzerland before) and it was such a contrast to Italy. The trees had changed colour and we had the car windows open so the breeze came through and it really seemed like fall weather at home, and I must say I had enough of the Italian summer lovely as it was to see, and to eat the fruits of. We have got such a nice place to stay, Mrs. Fields* has had a good deal of experience in living in Paris and she says she doesn’t think we can do better. It is the Hotel St. Petersbourg in the Rue Caumartin* and we have a nice bedroom and parlor

 [ Page 3 ]

and room for Liza* all on the first floor which means here, up one flight of stairs. I have sent a note to ‘Julie’* and am waiting with great impatience to see her. I think it will be great fun. Mrs. Fields has some friends here whom she will want to see as much as she can, and I mean to make Julie go cruising. You don’t know how lovely and kind dear Mrs. Fields is. I can’t tell you how many nice things she is always doing for me, and how much pleasanter it has made the summer to have her to see things with. I always mean to do every thing I can for her and to be with her all the time I can spare and that I don’t owe to my other friends.

 [ Page 4 ]

I do feel as if she needed me too and I really hate to think of her going home to be all alone while I go off to see all of you. I think if I don’t get up very early in the morning, I shall go home with her and spend the night, for it will be pleasanter ^for her^. We are so used to being together now --

-- --  We have been out cruising all the afternoon and had great luck. I really had come to rags, and I got a little waist to wear with my short black silk and now I can live on that. You somehow have a feeling as if you could pick up good clothes in the

[ Page 5

streets in Paris, but the truth is it is just about like going shopping in New York and not a bit easier or much cheaper. There are neat lovely shops for fancy things, and knickknacks and I wish I had all the money I started with so I could buy everything I saw for half a day! Paris is awfully nice and bright and amusing. I believe I always like the last place best. I mean the last very nice place. Sister wants to live in Venice and have crabs in she’s front door steps. [a short wavy line ]

              I got your last two letters here and I am so sorry I didn’t

 [ Page 6 ]

know about Taddy’s* wanting the Roman sash, but she wrote me when I was there that she wanted me to use the ten dollars she gave me for night-gowns so of course I thought she had changed her mind about the sash. I think they are lovely, but I don’t think they are very useful things. If I come across one here at any decent price I will get it, but as they were five dollars in Rome, I suppose here they would be nearly double. I should be so glad to get a thousand pretty things for all of you, but I had to get my winter clothes, and Mrs. Fields kept

 [ Page 7 ]

laughing and at last made me keep some money for them and it is a mercy sister being now in rags. Mrs. Ole* told us of such a nice dress maker and today we went to view her with great satisfaction. I am going to have a very dark red for my winter suit, about the colour of that wine coloured  thibet* I used to have & like so much when I was much as ever growed up. Good-night and Mrs. Fields sends a great deal of love and I wish Mother could see the Bon Marché. Jordan and

 [ Page 8 ]

Mash* are quite put out both as to size and glory. Sister to kite every place to Kirk Sessions tomorrow it being Sunday.

  [ No signature ]

 
Notes

even or ever:  What Jewett has written and what she means here seem unclear.  Perhaps she means to say that she has just arrived in Paris and is not yet ready to report about it.

Mount Cenis tunnel: Wikipedia says: "The Fréjus Rail Tunnel (also called Mont Cenis Tunnel) is a rail tunnel of 13.7 km (8.5 mi) length in the European Alps, carrying the Turin-Modane railway through Mount Cenis to an end-on connection with the Culoz-Modane railway and linking Bardonecchia in Italy to Modane in France."   l

Mrs. Fields:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

Hotel St. Petersbourg in the Rue Caumartin:  The  Hotel St. Petersbourg Opéra remains at 35 Rue Caumartin in 2016. 

Liza:  Personal servant of Annie Fields, who accompanied the pair on this trip.

'Julie':  The identity of Julie remains unknown.   It appears that she may be a singer, living in France but known to Jewett before Fields.  Assistance is welcome.

Taddy:   Other letters confirm that Taddy is female, but no other information about her is yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

Mrs. Ole:  Mrs. Ole Bull. See Correspondents.

thibet:  Thibet is a fine wool fabric used for dresses and also for coats in the 19th century.

Bon Marché …. Jordan and Mash: Wikipedia says: "Le Bon Marché ... is a department store in Paris. Founded in 1852 by Aristide Boucicaut, it was the first ever modern department store.
          Wikipedia also says that Jordan Marsh & Company was a Boston department store which became a regional chain in New England.  Eben Dyer Jordan opened a dry goods store in 1841; he eventually partnered with Benjamin L. Marsh as he expanded his business.

kite every place to Kirk Sessions:  Jewett indicates that she will be attending church, apparently in more than one place.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Paris 8 October

  Dear Mary

      How perfectly dreadful it was about Ralph Doe!* I sent Mrs. Doe a letter, but I could not say much of anything except how sorry I was for her, it must have been a dreadful shock. I hope to hear more about it in a day or two for I get your letters regularly now and it is so nice.

     -- We are getting on beautifully today and yesterday, and have started some frocks -- and I have ordered a nice big coat trimmed with fur which I have been setting my heart on all the time and meant to have if I had nothing else.

 [ Page 2 ]

I am going to have a dark red dress for my street suit ^I told you once though!^ and wear it under the cloak which throws off easily -- for you need not have a little outside coat to match your dress anymore. For instance you can wear your black plush jacket with anything. Dark blue and dark green and dark red all seem to be worn and braiding has come back. I wish if you have kept the braided pieces that were on the blue broadcloth dress you would have them put on again round the bottom of the petticoat &c over the plush. I’ll show you how I mean when I get home for it is new and very stylish and will make you as lovely a

 [ Page 3 ]

dress as you will want. I have got three dresses, a reddish silk for a dinner dress, and the darker red dress I told you about, and a light thin one for next summer. Even if I could afford it I think those are all I really need. It is a great temptation to get things here, they are so pretty. We are staying in today because Mrs. Fields* has somehow taken an awful cold and we are dwelling by the fire joyfully. Our rooms are so pretty and pleasant and it is such fun to see the people in the street. I must go out pretty soon to try on my dresses and I wish it was over

[ Page 4 ]

with. Do tell Miss Grant* that the lop-over ruffles have been all the fashion this summer just as she said, and I am a little more reconciled to them than at first but not much. We have not done much sightseeing yet for we were so busy yesterday and day before. Mrs. Fields sends love and I will write again in a day or two. I have not seen Julie* yet, she is still in the country --

Yours lovingly

S.O.J.


Notes

Ralph Doe:    Edith Bell Haven (Mrs. Charles Cogwell) Doe. According to her "Find-a-Grave" page, "Edith belonged to a reading group that included Georgina Halliburton, Celia Thaxter, Mary and Sarah Orne Jewett." Her son, Ralph Doe (1886-1882) died on 17 September in Nebraska at the age of 16.  His death record indicates that he was working in the cattle business near North Platte and died from injuries in a prairie fire.

Miss Grant: Olive Grant, South Berwick dress-maker.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Fields:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

Julie:  The identity of Julie remains unknown.   It appears that she may be a singer, living in France but known to Jewett before Fields.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Paris 10 October

Dear Mary

      I have been on the wing all day for Paris is growing more delightful every day, and we find more to do. First came your nice letter and Carrie’s* which is the nicest one I have had from her since I came away and I mean to write her soon as I can. After we had read ‘the mail’ and had breakfast we went to the Louvre* as we have been taking that in installments. Today we saw the last of the pictures and we had left some of the statuary and we wound up with a view of the Venus de Milo,* which is really more

 [ Page 2 ]

beautiful twice over than any of the copies -- I think usually the cast are as good as the originals, it isn’t like pictures which always seem to keep the life of the painter’s touch, and to lose it in a copy. Mrs. Fields* laughs because in Milan and Venice I fell dead in love with some pictures by an artist of the fifteenth century called Gentile Bellini. You pronounce him genteely Belleny, and he is very much to be admired but you can’t help laughing at his pictures, too. I found there were two of his works in the Louvre and have hunted

 [ Page 3 ]

and hunted until today I found them -- Then we went to the banker and then came home to lunch and found ‘Julie’* here and we had great fun and gossiped a good while and then she and I went out together and I went to see the apartment of four rooms she has taken for the winter. She is still in the country. Mrs. Fields has asked her in for Friday night and we are going to the opera and then I am going out in the country to spend the day with her. I have only seen her once

 [ Page 4 ]

before as she has been in Normandy and was detained there by the floods.* We are so lucky to have been in Italy. I mean in the region of Venice just when we were for if we had been a week later we should have had a very bad time. Julie looks just the same and is very bright and pleasant and she and Mrs. Fields get on together amazingly. Mrs. Fields has great fun with her and seems so much amused with her. We had her singing today and it seemed so much like old times. I am glad Mrs. F. does

 [ Page 5 ]

like her and see her ‘good side’ -- The Grangers* whom we saw so much in Interlaken are here too and we are very glad -- Thursday we mean to go to Versailles and I shall enjoy that very much. In the evenings we have been reading a book about the French Revolution* which makes Paris twice as interesting. Goodnight with ever so much love from the Q of Sheby* --

Tell mother Julie looks just like the little owl!!

Notes

Carrie's:  Caroline Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.  See Correspondents.

Louvre: The world's largest art museum in Paris.

Venus de Milo:    Wikipedia says: "Aphrodite of Milos ..., better known as the Venus de Milo, is an ancient Greek statue and one of the most famous works of ancient Greek sculpture. Created sometime between 130 and 100 BCE, it is believed to depict Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty (Venus to the Romans). It is a marble sculpture, slightly larger than life size at 203 cm (6 ft 8 in) high. Part of an arm and the original plinth were lost following its discovery. From an inscription that was on its plinth, it is thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch; earlier, it was mistakenly attributed to the master sculptor Praxiteles. It is currently on permanent display at the Louvre Museum in Paris. The statue is named after the Greek island of Milos, where it was discovered."

Mrs. Fields:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

'Julie':  this person remains unknown.  It appears that she may be a singer, living in France but known to Jewett before Fields.  Assistance is welcome.

Normandy … the floods: Normandy is a region of northwest France. 
    There were major floods in both Europe and the United States during 1882.  According to memoranda of "John Davies Mereweather, " "In September 1882, during the reign of King Umberto I, north-eastern Italy suffered from heavy rains which, together with melting snow from the Alps, caused disastrous inundations. The Adige burst its banks, and large areas were flooded. Verona, in particular, suffered serious damage. Communication between that city and Venice was entirely cut off. Mereweather reports to English newspapers that the 'misery, ruin, and suffering are widespread and painful to contemplate'.  And 'scantily-dressed men, women, and children may be seen gazing in dumb despair on the ruins of the dwellings from which they escaped as these crumbled and dissolved amid the surging waters'. According to the Italian consul in Manchester, nearly 200,000 persons were rendered homeless. In November, Mereweather writes, 'a fresh series of storms swept over this unfortunate country and made matters infinitely worse'.
     There also were floods in much of France during the autumn of 1882.  Before 2016, the worst flooding in Paris had taken place in December 1882.

the Grangers:   The identities of these persons is unknown.

French Revolution:     Wikipedia says: "The French Revolution ... was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France that lasted from 1789 until 1799, and was partially carried forward by Napoleon during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, experienced violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon that rapidly brought many of its principles to Western Europe and beyond."

Q of Sheby: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Sunday 15th October

Dear O. P.*

      Only think, when you get this letter I shall be already on the sea! Every body has had a good voyage lately that I have heard of and I hope we shall. I can’t write much today for we are going to Mrs. Greene’s* to dine and I shall have to dress pretty soon. Did I tell you how much I had enjoyed her? She is a sister of Mr. Quincy Shaw’s and it was her daughter Bessie who was lost on the Schiller at the time Dr. Susan Dimoch was lost.* --  She is a lovely woman

 [ Page 2 ]

and one of Mrs. Fields’s best friends but they had not seen each other for five years. She has been so nice ever since we have been here. I must tell you about our day at Versailles which was perfectly delightful. It was a real Indian summer day* and the park was more beautiful than any I have ever seen, full of magnificent trees. The elms grow on either side of the avenues and are trained and trimmed so they make the loveliest great arches like those in Milan Cathedral. Then there are rows of poplars very

 [ Page 3 ]

long and stiff and splendid, and great gardens and fountains and clipped hedges all most beautifully kept. The Palace is crammed with pictures and just to walk through all the rooms takes several hours for the buildings cover ever so many acres. I don’t dare to tell you how many! You can see where Marie Antoinette* lived and all her furniture and many things left there when they were mobbed and brought into Paris. The King’s apartments were beautiful, and it is such a beautiful place altogether. We went to the Little Trianon*

 [ Page 4 ]

where the King and Queen used to go for pleasure and even the Queen’s piano was there and ever so many things in her bedroom as if she had just gone away yesterday, poor creature. Of course there were others living at Versailles before them but nobody since -- I do want to tell you all about it when I get home. Yesterday I went to the country to spend the day with Julia* and had a very nice time and a splendid breakfast! Mrs. Fields was going too (Julia came in Friday and spent the night.) but it rained and she did not feel as if it were safe, as her cold isn’t well yet. Julia really is going to have a beautiful place

 [ Page 5 ]

out there, and though I couldn’t see as much of the outside ^as^ I wished, I still could see a good deal. Her gardens must have been beautiful earlier in the season. She is coming into Paris very soon now for the winter. She has ever so much land on the place she has bought, and is so interested in it and I do think it is a capital thing for her and that she is much happier than ever she was in Washington. -----

      I must say good-bye, and do a little packing before I [dare ?] to go* out. I don’t know which

 [ Page 6 ]

^way^ we shall turn tomorrow there are so many things we want to do. You don’t know how glad I am to be going back to London! Love to Mother and all from Sarah.



Notes

O.P.:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.

Mrs. Greene ...  a sister of Mr. Quincy Shaw’s ... her daughter Bessie ... lost on the Schiller at the time Dr. Susan Dimoch was lost:       Wikipedia says:  "SS Schiller was a 3,421 ton German ocean liner, one of the largest vessels of her time. Launched in 1873,[1] she plied her trade across the Atlantic Ocean, carrying passengers between New York and Hamburg for the German Transatlantic Steam Navigation Line. She became notorious on 7 May 1875, while operating on her normal route, when she hit the Retarrier Ledges in the Isles of Scilly [in the English Channel], causing her to sink with the loss of most of her crew and passengers, totaling 335 fatalities."
          Wikipedia also says: "Susan Dimock M.D. (April 24, 1847 – May 7, 1875) was a pioneer in American Medicine who received her qualification as a doctor from the University of Zurich in 1871 and was subsequently appointed resident physician of the New England Hospital for Women and Children in 1872. The hospital, now known as the Dimock Community Health Center, was renamed in her honor after her tragic drowning in 1875. Dimock was traveling to Europe for pleasure and profession when she died in the shipwreck of the SS Schiller off the coast of the Scilly Isles. She is also remembered for becoming the first woman member of the North Carolina Medical Society."
    According to Wikipedia, Quincy Adams Shaw (1825-1908) of Boston inherited great wealth and spent much of his life engaged in various business and philanthropic activities.  He traveled in the West with his cousin, Francis Parkman, Jr., who dedicated his book, The Oregon Trail, to Shaw.  Members of his family were active in abolition and the Civil War.  He married Pauline Agassiz, daughter of the Harvard biologist, Louis Agassiz.
    Shaw's sister,  Anna Blake Shaw (1817-1901), married the minister and activist, William Batchelder Greene (1819-1878).  Their daughter, Elizabeth (Bessie, 1846-1875), who became a benefactor of the New England Hospital for Women and Children and was lost with the Schiller. See also Wikipedia and The Fiftieth Anniversary of the New England Hospital for Women and Children (1913 )pp. 48-9.

            The circled number 31 in pencil, apparently in another hand, appears above the final "lost" in the sentence the above note explains.

Mrs. Fields:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

Indian summer day: In the northern hemisphere, an unseasonably warm spell between late September and early November, usually after the first killing frost.

Marie Antoinette: Wikipedia says: "Marie Antoinette ...  born Maria Antonia Josepha Johanna (1755 - 1793), was the last Queen of France prior to the French Revolution....
    "After a two-day trial begun on 14 October 1793, Marie Antoinette was convicted by the Revolutionary Tribunal of high treason, and executed by guillotine on Place de la Révolution on 16 October 1793."

little Trianon: Wikipedia says: "Petit Trianon ... built between 1762 and 1768 during the reign of Louis XV, is a small château located on the grounds of the Palace of Versailles in Versailles, France. The park of the Grand Trianon includes the Petit Trianon."

Julia:  It seems likely this is the same person who is referred to in other 1882 letters from Europe as "Julie." The identity of Julie remains unknown.   It appears that she may be a singer, living in France but known to Jewett before Fields.  Assistance is welcome.

go:  The circled number 31 in pencil, apparently in another hand, appears beneath "go."

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.


  
SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


10 Clarges St.
London
18 October
[1882]


Dear O.P.*

      It was delightful to get back here last evening. After all London is the best place! and it is very homelike at this house and quite pleasant to hear one’s own language. Wasn’t it funny that I should have had a letter from you just as we were leaving the hotel in Paris and [ deleted word ] then I found one waiting for me here both beautiful lettys. Mrs. Fields* and I nearly gave up about some of your remarks. We were very tired* when we got here, for

[ Page 2 ]

it is a long day’s journey and the Channel thrown in -- We were not seasick but next thing to it, that is you get all shaken up. Liza* succumbed to fate, and was much depressed. She and Mrs. Fields have now gone forth in a hansom cab to attend to much business, but I have caught the cold that everybody does in Paris and so I stayed in there being an excellent London fog without of so yellow a nature that I can’t much more than see to write in our lightest front window. An English lady whom we met coming down from Norway

[ Page 3 ]

last summer told us of this place, and it is so nice. We engaged the rooms before we went on the continent =* We went to see Miss Gardner* before we left Paris and had a very pleasant call indeed. She seemed glad to see us, and showed us what she was doing. She was painting such a pretty model a little French girl, for a picture of Evangeline.* She had just come back from the country. I hardly remember seeing her, but she remembered me when I was a little girl.* She was most cordial and kind and seemed to be full

[ Page 4

of business with her pictures. Mrs. Fields is going to the Cunard office this morning to see if we can change our stateroom ^tickets to the next steamer --, so we shall have a week or so lnger before we set sail -- There are so many things we want to do in London that we shall have to be very busy, and it would be ever so much more comfortable to have a little more time{.} I will leave my letter open and tell you what the result is, when she comes home. I am sorry to 

[ Page 5 ]

  keep you waiting and to keep myself waiting any longer, but it will be so little while --

       She says that we couldn’t get a good stateroom on the Cephalonia -- and on the Parthia* we have the best, so we shall sail the 25th. Love to all from the

Queen --*

Notes

10 Clarges Street:  Which hotel was located at this London Mayfair address is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

O.P.:  A Jewett nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.  

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  See Correspondents.

tired:  The circled number 32 in pencil, apparently in another hand, appears above "tired." 

Liza:  Personal servant of Annie Fields, who accompanied the pair on this trip. 

=:  Jewett sometimes uses an = sign where one might expect her to use a dash.  In this case, she used 3 parallel lines.  

Mrs. Gardner … a picture of Evangeline:  Probably this is Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau (1837 - 1922).  Wikipedia says she was "an American academic and salon painter, who was born in Exeter, New Hampshire. She was an American expatriate who died in Paris where she had lived most of her life. She studied in Paris under the figurative painter Hugues Merle (1823 - 1881), the well-known salon painter Jules Joseph Lefebvre (1836 - 1911), and finally under William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825 - 1905). After Bouguereau's wife died, Gardner became his paramour and after the death of his mother, who bitterly opposed the union, she married him in 1896. She adopted his subjects, compositions and even his smooth facture, channeling his style so successfully that some of her work might be mistaken for his."
    Probably, Jewett refers to her as "Mrs. Gardner" because at this time, she was living with, but not married to Mr. Bouguereau.
        No painting of hers entitled "Evangeline" has yet been located.  It seems likely that the subject of such a painting would be Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's character in his narrative poem, Evangeline (1847), which recounts the sad love story of an Acadian woman.

Cephalonia … Parthia: Wikipedia says that the Cunard steamship line, which has been a leading North Atlantic passenger steam-ship line since 1839. The SS Parthia was in service from 1870 to 1884, the SS Caphalonia from 1882 to 1900.

Queen: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.
               The circled number 32 in pencil, apparently in another hand, appears beneath at the bottom left of this page.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.    




SOJ to John Geenleaf Whittier  


London
10 Clarges Street*
October 19, [1882]


My dear Friend:

      This is the last time I shall write you from this side of the sea for if all goes well we shall be coming in on the Parthia* on the Sunday morning after this letter reaches you.

      Mrs. Fields* has gone out alone to do some pleasant things we planned to do together, for just before we left Paris I took an enormous cold which doubled itself, as it crossed the Channel, so in these last dear days in London I must stay in the house. It is a great pity! but I am the last person who ought to grumble, for I have been so fortunate all this summer long. How soon I shall be seeing you! and telling you stories so long that you will be tired of listening! I have had such a good time and I am so glad I need not stay away from home all winter!!

     We are perfectly delighted to find that you are really going to spend the winter in town and Mrs. Fields says she is going to try to make you promise to come one certain day every week to breakfast (besides every other day you can!) and then we shall be sure of you. I say "we" be¬cause I hope I shall be at 148 Charles St. very often indeed. What times where will be at the Winthrop House1 with you and "The Sandpiper"* both under its roof. Something may happen to the roof, for all I know! Now goodbye and God bless you, and if you don't find any news in this letter you will find my love and A. F.'s beside.


 Yrs ever, S. O. J. 


Oh -- "Asquam Lake"2 was perfectly beautiful. Mrs. Fields found it copied into a paper, and we guawked over it as even the Sandpiper never could! and were so proud. It was fresh and strong and carried us straight there to see it too. 


Richard Cary's Notes

1. The Winthrop Hotel on Bowdoin Street in Boston was a frequent retreat for Mrs. Thaxter when the winters on the Isles of Shoals became too rigorous. Whittier spent the winter of 1882-1883 at the hotel to be near his dying brother.

2. "Storm on Lake Asquam," dated "7th mo., 1882," was first published in the Atlantic Monthly, L (October 1882), 463, and collected in The Bay of Seven Islands, and Other Poems (1883).

Additional editor's notes

10 Clarges Street:  Which hotel was located at this London Mayfair address is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

ParthiaWikipedia says that the Cunard steamship line, which has been a leading North Atlantic passenger steam-ship line since 1839. The SS Parthia was in service from 1870 to 1884.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.  She resided at 148 Charles St. in Boston.  See Correspondents.

The Sandpiper:  A nickname given to Celia Thaxter by her closest friends. See Correspondents.

This letter was transcribed and annotated by Richard Cary, and first published in  "'Yours Always Lovingly': Sarah Orne Jewett to John Greenleaf Whittier,"  Essex Institute Historical Collections 107 (1971): 412-50. This article was reprinted at the Sarah Orne Jewett Text Project by permission of the library of the American Antiquarian Society and the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum. 



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

10 Clarges St.*
 Monday 23
[October, 1882]


Dear Mary

       I will just send one more letter on the chance that you may get it before I get home. My cold is nearly well and it is lovely weather so we hope to have a good voyage. Yesterday we had a beautiful time! We went to St. Paul’s* where there was fine music, and one of the regiments just returned

[ Page 2 ]

from [deleted word] Egypt was all paraded at service -- and later in the day the [ Light corrected ]Household Guards* the crack London regiment marched up Piccadilly and all London turned out to see them and to cheer. Sister [in ?] excellent time! I am afraid next Sunday will seem quite tame in contrast! Love to all. Oh Mrs. Ritchie* was charming, and we had such a lunch at Miss Hogarth’s* Saturday, and a pleasant tea at

[ Up the left margin of page 2

Mrs. Smalley’s. Mrs. Huxley* was there & was very

[ Up the left margin of page 1]

nice. I have had such a lovely summer and Mrs. Fields* has been so kind. We are off today for Liverpool. Love to all from the Q of S.* Only think this is really the last letter before I come home!  


Notes

10 Clarges Street:  Which hotel was located at this London Mayfair address is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

Light Household Guards:  Presumably Jewett refers to what is now known as the Household Cavalry.  Wikipedia says: "The two regiments of the Household Cavalry are regarded as the most prestigious in the British Army, due to their role as the monarch's official bodyguard."

Mrs. Ritchie: Wikipedia says: "Anne Isabella, Lady Ritchie, née Thackeray (1837 - 1919), was an English writer. She was the eldest daughter of William Makepeace Thackeray. She was the author of several novels which were highly regarded in their time, and a central figure in the late Victorian literary scene. She is perhaps best remembered today as the custodian of her father's literary legacy, and for her short fiction placing traditional fairy tale narratives in a Victorian milieu."

Miss Hogarth: Wikipedia says: "Georgina Hogarth (1827 - 1917) was the sister-in-law, housekeeper, and adviser of English novelist Charles Dickens and the editor of two volumes of his collected letters after his death."

Mrs. Smalley’s ... Mrs. Huxley:  Mrs. Smalley is Phoebe Garnaut (d. 1923) whose husband, George Washburn Smalley (1833-1916), was war and foreign correspondent for the New York Tribune.
     Mrs. Huxley is Julia Arnold (1862 - 1908), daughter of British literary scholar Tom Arnold and niece of the poet Matthew Arnold.  She was the first wife of the British educator Leonard Huxley (1860-1933), who was the son of the famous zoologist and defender of Charles Darwin, Thomas Henry Huxley.  Leonard and Julia were the parents of two especially distinguished sons, biologist Julian and writer Aldous.

Mrs. Fields:    Annie Adams Fields, often referred to in Jewett's letters as A.F.   See Correspondents.

Q of S: The Queen of Sheba was a Jewett family nickname for Jewett.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909.  Mary Rice Jewett 1847-1930, recipient,  40 letters; 1877-1892 & n.d.  Sarah Orne Jewett Correspondence, 1861-1930.  MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College, with assistance from Tanner Brossart and Linda Heller.


Edited by Terry Heller, Coe College.

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