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Sarah Orne Jewett Letters of 1883



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Friday morning

Spring House*

Richfield Springs, N.Y.
[ 1880 - early 1883 ]

Dear Mary,

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  Poor foolish Annie Collins* -- why couldn’t she have behaved!  ‘Lord he knows!’ as Sandpiper* used to settle things -- but there is something wrong morally in her and a little peg in her head that works wrong.  I wish Jimmy* had always made her go to church -- that is the one hold on such as she.  I am so glad you heard that Hannah* was better but if you should be driving just slip down & ask the doctor. --------------------------------

             Templeman Coolidge’s grandma is all dead up and had a nice funeral at King’s Chapel* this day, and every body was marrying on Beacon Street with awnings out and “marrying hacks.”  We should have gone to the Hemenway wedding* but didn’t -- and Sally Rice* said it was the same with her.   ----------------------------------------

 

Sarah


Notes

1880 - early 1883: Current information creates confusion about the date of this letter.  I have placed it at the latest likely date.  As the notes below indicate, Jewett seems to reference the important society wedding of Augustus Hemenway, which took place in December of 1881, and the death of another important person in Boston society, Elizabeth Boyer Coolidge Swett on January 21, 1880.  These events are nearly 2 years apart.  Perhaps she refers to different events than she appears to, but no clarifying information has been discovered.  Assistance is welcome.
    The hyphens at the beginning, middle and end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

Spring House:  Richfield Springs, NY, was known for its sulfur springs, where 19th-century patients sought relief for various conditions, rheumatism in Jewett's case.

Annie Collins: Annie Collins, who is mentioned in other letters, was a Jewett family employee.  It is possible also that Will Collins has for the family.  It is reasonably likely that Annie and Will Collins are brother and sister.  FamilyTreeNow.com provides this census information.
    Annie Collins (1860 until after 1930), of Irish parents, resident of South Berwick, Maine in 1930.
    William Collins (1864 until after 1930), brother to Annie, born in Maine, resident of South Berwick, Maine in 1930.
    Neither was married in 1930.

Sandpiper:  Celia Laighton Thaxter.  See Correspondents

Jimmy: While this is somewhat speculative, in "Trades Hike: Servant: Hannah Driscoll" is mentioned James Collins, an Irish immigrant uncle of Hannah Driscoll, who shared her household sometime after 1887.

Hannah: While there are several possibilities for the identity of this Hannah, it seems likely she was Hannah Driscoll (c1846- after 1887), a Jewett neighbor and helper who, according to Paula Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett, took care of Uncle William Durham Jewett. See "Trades Hike: Servant: Hannah Driscoll" by the Marshwood School District and the Old Berwick HIstorical Society.

Templeman Coolidge’s grandma is all dead up: : John Templeman Coolidge (1856-1945) and his first wife, Katherine Scollay Parkman (1858-1900), daughter of historian Francis Parkman, summered in Portsmouth, NH, at the historic Wentworth Mansion, which they restored and maintained over many years, beginning in 1886. Wikipedia says: "Coolidge was a Boston Brahmin, artist and antiquarian who used the property as a summer home. His guests included such luminaries as John Singer Sargent, Edmund C. Tarbell and Isabella Stewart Gardner."  One of his grandmothers was Elizabeth Boyer Coolidge Swett (1797-January 21, 1880), the mother of his father, Joseph Swett Coolidge, who changed his last name from Swett to Coolidge upon his marriage to Mary Louisa Coolidge (1832-  ) daughter of John Templeman and Louisa Riché Tilden (1811- 10 April 1899), his grandmother, therefore, on his mother's side.  See The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volumes 76-77 from the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1922. p. 297.

the Hemenway wedding: It seems likely that this is the wedding of Augustus Hemenway (1853-1931) and Harriet Dexter Lawrence in December of 1881.

Sally Rice:  This person's identity is uncertain.  She may be Sarah Rice (1825-1907), daughter of General Charles Rice (1787-1863), who served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives.  She was a cousin to John Hamilton Rice and, by marriage, to Jewett's friend, Cora Clark Rice. See Correspondents

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Monday morning

[ 19 February 1883 ]*



Dear darling your letter has done me good, and I wish you would scold at me a great deal more than you ever do -- I dont believe it was anything but tiredness that made me miserable when I read the Atlantic notice* -- An awful* feeling of despair rushed over me at the thought of doing any more writing at all. This has been one of the times when I really have lost all my interest in my stories -- and it was not the so much that

[ Page 2 ]

my pride was hurt as that I felt entirely incapable of doing anything more at all.  When I think about it now, seriously, I am sure that I have done the best I could at this work of mine, and so I have nothing to fear.  I shall be better by and by, and the stories will begin to write themselves down again but the truth is that most of the time now I am really ill -- It frets me even to think

[ Page 3 ]

about copying and all the rest of it! and at the same time I am worrying because I cant get my work done when for many reasons it would be best. 

    -- I begin to dread [ next corrected ] winter before this one is finished -- I wonder why the people who are well most of the time are not a great deal better contented! I believe I should not mind anything much if I were only well --

    I didn't mean that you scolded

[ Page 4 ]

me, little books!* I don't know why that word pushed itself in -- for I thought your letter was the dearest bit of love and wisdom anybody could ask for -- ( As for the verses -- I must tell you that some of them have been printed already and the boat-song* --  which I was so glad to have you like -- was given to a little fair paper in Portsmouth once -- and more than that a musician who happened to see it when he drove in to the fair )

[ Manuscript breaks off.  No signature. ]


Notes

19 February 1883:  This date is highly speculative, but with some circumstantial support.  Jewett wrote a letter to T. B. Aldrich dated 20 February, informing him that "Boat Song" had been published previously, after Fields had let him have it for consideration (see notes below).  Jewett dates this letter "Monday morning." It seems reasonable to guess that after writing to Fields on Monday 19 February 1883, Jewett realized that she should also write to Aldrich on this topic.
    The other likely year during Aldrich's editorship at Atlantic would be 1888, when 20 February fell on a Monday, but in that year, it was Fields who was suffering from serious illness, and by late February, they were planning their first trip to St. Augustine, FL.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

Atlantic notice:  This remark is quite puzzling, for no Atlantic review has yet been discovered that was seriously negative about Jewett's work. On one hand, as Atlantic and Houghton, Mifflin published much of Jewett's work, they had an interest in promoting it and were unlikely to print strongly negative opinions. On the other, reviews of Jewett were fairly consistent in emphasizing various kinds of limitations of her work, nearly always saying that what she produced was the best of a limited kind of writing.  It is not yet known, then, which notice or review may have provoked Jewett's reaction.

awful: Above this difficult to read word, penciled neatly in another hand, appears the word "awful."

little books: The meaning of this phrase is puzzling.  Perhaps Jewett meant to write something else?

boat-song: Weber and Weber report Jewett's statement that "The Boat Song" first appeared in a little paper published at a fair in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. However, this paper has not been located. John Austin Parker, according to Nagel and Nagel's Sarah Orne Jewett: A Reference Guide, writes in "Sarah Orne Jewett's 'Boat Song,'" American Literature 23 (1951): "Among the uncataloged materials of the Library of Congress is a copy of 'Boat Song,' words by Miss Sarah O. Jewett.  Music by Richd. Hoffman.  New York:  G. Schirmer, c. 1879."

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Thomas Bailey Aldrich

South Berwick
20 February [ 1883 ]*

[ Letterhead of the initials SOJ superimposed ]

Dear Mr. Aldrich

    Mrs. Fields* has just written me that [deleted word ] you -- I mean the Atlantic -- took the boat song* away to be printed -- I'm afraid you wont want it, for it is already in print.  I gave it to a little paper that

[ Page 2 ]

was published at a fair in Portsmouth and Hoffman the New York pianist saw it by chance and set it to music and it was afterward published by some music publishers.  I am very sorry, for I wish it could be in the Atlantic and this all puts it out of

[ Page 3 ]

the question doesn't it?  I wrote it for the Atlantic to begin with, strangely enough.  Mr. Howells* sent to me for some verses at a time when he had a musical department in the magazine -- but he didn't like my boat song though I have always been fond of it myself.

--    I hear that the Duchess* goes to New

[ Page 4 ]

York today, and I wish her a pleasant journey. I wish she had been coming here instead, though I must confess that I dont find Berwick delightful at this time of the year --

    Good-by my dear friend!

Yours always sincerely

S. O. J.       


Notes

1883:  This is the earliest likely year for the composition of this letter.  The choice receives confirmation from another letter that deals with the accidental submission to Aldrich of a previously published poem, SOJ to Aldrich of 20 February 1883, and that seems more clearly to have been written in 1883.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

boat song: Weber and Weber report Jewett's statement that "The Boat Song" first appeared in a little paper published at a fair in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. However, this paper has not been located. John Austin Parker, "Sarah Orne Jewett's 'Boat Song,'" American Literature 23 (1951), according to Nagel and Nagel's Sarah Orne Jewett: A Reference Guide, writes: "Among the uncataloged materials of the Library of Congress is a copy of 'Boat Song,' words by Miss Sarah O. Jewett.  Music by Richd. Hoffman.  New York:  G. Schirmer, c. 1879."

Mr. Howells: William Dean Howells. See Correspondents.

the Duchess:  Lilian Woodman Aldrich. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Baily Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
     At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2655.


SOJ to Horace Scudder

     South Berwick, Maine
     March 3, [1883]

    Dear Mr. Scudder:

     I ought to have told you that Mr. Warner1 wished to have the manuscripts returned to 148 Charles St. instead of to Hartford, in case you do not wish to use them,2 but I forgot this when we were talking yesterday.
     Yours ever sincerely,

     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

     1 Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), co-author with Mark Twain of The Gilded Age, was editor of the Hartford Courant from 1861 to 1900, and contributing editor of Harper's from 1884 to 1898. Tireless in his encouragement of female writers, he visited Miss Jewett at South Berwick and she, in turn, stopped regularly at the Warner household in Hartford.
     2 Miss Jewett may be referring to some sketches or poems she sent to Warner, with the request that he relay them to Scudder if they were not suitable. Harper's and the Atlantic Monthly published Miss Jewett a total of six times this year.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.


SOJ to John Geenleaf Whittier

 148 Charles Street

Saturday, April 28, [1883]

My dear Friend:

     Here it is, almost May Day! and all the aches and pains that "neurology" knows how to produce ought to be over by that time. I have thought of you a great many times, and wondered how you were getting on. Last night I dreamed that I went to a charity meeting with A. F. and there was a great row there, and in attempting to take her part I fell over a wall and hurt my arm abominably. In fact it waked me up it ached so, but it was no benevolent almsgiver who brought me to such distress; I had simply connected a familiar subject of thought with the familiar pain!1 However, T. L.2 was greatly amused with the dream. The particulars of the battle were very edifying.

     I have been writing again by fits and starts and this time the story is called "The Hare and the Tortoise.”3 It is a love story with its scene laid in Boston, and the Hare and the Tortoise are two lovers, and in this fable it is the Hare that wins the race. I was glad you liked the "Landless Farmer.”4 I think you will find the second part better when you see it in the magazine than it was on the uncorrected proof slips. Mrs. Fields is sending you the Jane Carlyle books5 which we have enjoyed so much! I see them now, put out for Patrick6 to "do up" with his usual precision.

     We went to Manchester by the Sea7 Thursday, to see about opening the house on Monday when we go down again. It was a hard day for poor T. L. but we made the best of it, and had a great many pleasures after all. The frogs had thawed out -- they were talking in their sleep at any rate, and the barberry bushes were covered with dry fruit on top, where the improvident people had not thought it worthwhile to harvest. The sun shone through the berries with marvellous effect* and we had a famous drive back to Beverly, where we took the half past four train instead of waiting at Manchester an hour or two. We were in an excellent buggy with its top put back and the sun kept us very warm, and we gathered some pussy willows almost grown into cats, if one judged by their fur. The sea was as blue as it could be and furthermore we had had a picnic at the back of the house on the hilltop where we were sheltered from the wind. T. L. pointed out the Danvers road to me with great satisfaction and expectation of our travelling over it by and by. I must say goodbye for here comes T. L. upstairs having finished her day's housekeeping and now we are going out to do some errands together. She sends her dear love to you and so do I.

Yours most affectionately,

Sarah

 
Notes

1 Annie Fields [A.F.] was a founder and leading spirit of the Associated Charities of Boston. She wrote How To Help the Poor (Boston, 1883) as a guidebook to humane and personalized philanthropy. While Jewett was not averse to accompanying Mrs. Fields on her errands of mercy, her enthusiasm was not equivalent.

2  A covert pet name which Miss Jewett teasingly applied to Annie Fields. No revelation has yet been discovered in any of Miss Jewett's public or private writings. [It is possible Jewett uses a pet name that Whittier applied to Fields.  Assistance is welcome.]

3  One of Miss Jewett's infrequent Boston stories (Atlantic Monthly, in [August1883], 187-199; uncollected) with an O'Henryesque ending. "Boston is like meeting one's grandmother in costume at a fancy ball," she says, with some provincial smugness.

4 "A Landless Farmer," Atlantic Monthly, LI (May, June 1883), 627-637, 759-769, in which Jerry Jenkins is shunted into a King Lear position by his ingrate daughters. Whittier had written: "I found the 'Landless Farmer' true as a sun-picture to the life and atmosphere of a farming neighborhood and the story of poor old Uncle Jerry full of genuine pathos." (Cary, "Whittier Letters," 13.)

5  James Anthony Froude, editor, Letters and Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle, Prepared for Publication by Thomas Carlyle (New York, 1883), 2 vols. The packet may also have contained Thomas Carlyle's Reminiscences, edited by Froude (New York, 1881), about which Miss Jewett had written: "I have been reading Carlyle's Reminiscences -- the Jane Welsh Carlyle  [chapter], as you may suppose." (Fields, Letters, p. 17.) Copies of both books are in Miss Jewett's library.

6  Patrick Lynch, Mrs. Fields's man of all work.

7  Miss Jewett spent part of every summer at the Fields's "Gambrel Cottage" on the Massachusetts coast. In A Little Book of Friends (Boston, 1916) Harriet Prescott Spofford describes the "wonderful out­look of beauty set in the midst of flaming flowers, three sides overlooking the wide shield of the sea, but the fourth side so precipitous that the broad piazza there is only a turret chamber above the tops of the deep woods and orchards below, with the birds flying under it, and looking far over the winding river, ripening meadow, and stretching sea again." (p. 19.)

Editor's Notes

sun shone through the berries with marvellous effect:  Jewett uses this image in her story, "Farmer Finch," which appeared in two parts in Atlantic Monthly, May and June 1883.

This letter was transcribed and annotated by Richard Cary, and first published in  "'Yours Always Lovingly': Sarah Orne Jewett to John Greenleaf Whittier,"  Essex Institute Historical Collections 107 (1971): 412-50. This article was reprinted at the Sarah Orne Jewett Text Project by permission of the library of the American Antiquarian Society and the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum.


 
SOJ to Jessie McDermott

 South Berwick, Maine
     May 23, 1883
 

     Dear Miss McDermott:

     I have looked at the picture which you drew for my little story in the June Wide Awake1 with so much pleasure that I wish to thank you. I think it is charmingly done, and the doleful little girl in the chair is so like the Katy whom I 'made up,' that it seems quite wonderful.
     Yours is really a most careful and satisfactory piece of work, but I wish I could say the same of my sketch which somehow missed being read in the proof, and which ought to have been revised by its guilty writer. However! -- and I will do my part better next time.2
     Yours sincerely and with many thanks.

     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

     1 "Katy's Birthday," Wide Awake, XVII (June 1883), 36-40; collected in Katy's Birthday by Sarah O. Jewett with Other Stories by Famous Authors (Boston, 1883).
     2 Miss Jewett may have felt sheepish over the fact that on page 40 the word in was printed instead of and.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.




SOJ to Alexander W. Drake*

26 May 1883


As for my own verses, I dont remember anything except Gosport Church* which would [be] of any use to you.  There was a story published long ago in my youth in Merry Museum called The Orchard's Grandmother.*  I never could tell why I did not print it in Playdays for it was one of the best things I ever did:  partly "made up" but having for its foundation the history of that old apple tree* which was the ancestor of most of the orchards hereabout.  It stood on the main-road from Berwick to York and probably you know it well -- and can tell more about it than I.

    I am truly grieved to hear of Mrs. Drake's illness.  it must have been a long sorrowful winter to you both.  I hoped that I should see you, but the month [flew] by, it seems to me, and so many pleasant things were crowded out.  I have done a good deal of writing and have been much better than usual, though I had a horrid time with rheumatism while the snow was going off.

Thank you so much for your kind letter -- and I am yours always sincerely

                            Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

Drake:  The transcriber includes a note: [To:   Mr. Drake  From S. B.  26 May 1883].  In the absence of further information, one cannot be certain that Jewett's recipient is Alexander W. Drake.  However, this seems highly probable.  From 1870, for nearly 40 years, Alexander W. Drake (1843-1916) was art superintendent at St. Nicholas and Scribner's Monthly, which later became Century Magazine.  That this letter seems to concern the possible re-publication of a Jewett work for young readers would suggest that she is responding to Mr. Drake about a project related to St. Nicholas.  If this scenario holds, then this may be correspondence leading to the publication of "Perseverence," a poem that appeared in St. Nicholas 10 (September 1883), with an illustration by Rose Mueller.  The poem was reprinted in Mary Mapes Dodge, Baby World: Stories, Rhymes, and Pictures for Little Folks, New York: Century, 1884, pp. 258-9, (first two stanzas), and in Verses 1916 as "A Four-Leaved Clover."
    See Susan R. Gannon, Suzanne Rahn, Ruth Anne Thompson, St. Nicholas and Mary Mapes Dodge: The Legacy of a Children's Magazine Editor, 1873-1905 (2004), pp. 55-7.

Gosport church:  Jewett's "Gosport" poem almost certainly is "Star Island," which first appeared in Harper's Magazine 63 (September 1881). 

The Orchard's Grandmother ... Playdays:  "The Orchard's Grandmother" appeared in Merry's Museum 59 (May 1871).  Jewett's collection of fiction for children, Playdays, appeared in 1878.

old apple tree:  In Ancient City of Gorgeana and Modern Town of York (1874), George Alexander Emery tells the story of the old apple tree said to have been brought from England to York in about 1629:
"The apple-tree flourishes well, and bears bountifully in this town; so much so, that Cider-Hill has long been a name applied to a section in the northerly portion of the town.  Here is still standing an apple-tree which is said to have been brought from England, in a little tub or box, by one of the early settlers, more than two hundred and forty years ago.  It has borne fruit up to the present time (1874); but the trunk is a mere upright hollow log, and only one limb retaining any vitality, it is not likely to survive many years longer" (p. 89).
A note with this transcription indicates that the manuscript of this letter is in the "Yale University Collection -- Sterling Library -- New Haven, Conn." A search of Yale Manuscript and Archives finding guides provides an exact location: Yale Collection of American Literature --  Letter Collection YCAL MSS 446, Box 15.  This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories, letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, folder 63, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Wednesday evening

   [May 1883]*

                                Wednesday evening


Dear darling I do miss you dreadfully, but Pinny* is going to be good (though you forgot to tell her to be!)  It seems so strange and lonely to be without you after all this dear time we have been together. but I daresay I shall get into my old tracks after a day or two =  it has been chilly and I have felt the change in the air a good deal, but I am going to try gardening to morrow if the weather

[ Page 2 ]

is right.  I have been driving all afternoon with Mary* and we stayed ever so long down in the woods by the river where it is sheltered from the wind and had a beautiful time.  It was low tide and the salt grass was very fragrant on one side to match the pines on the other and one pee wee chirped a lonesome note in

[ Page 3 ]

the bushes as [ if corrected ] she were named Pinny and had left a Fuffy* in some far Boston -- -- (I haven't even unpacked my boxes yet, except to hunt for the plums)* but there is no great hurry.

    -- Your dearest note has come and I was so* glad to get it and Sandpiper's* was a dear one too --  I mean to go down with Mary very soon.  Wasn't it funny about the sparrows

[ Page 4 ]

 with their crops full?

     -- I have been looking over the Atlantic and liking it very much -- only I think it was an outrage to have filled so much space in three numbers with Daisy Miller's Dramatization --*   I dont see how Mr. James could bear to waste his time over it --  Oh, dear Fuff,  the cheque for your article will not come until the first day of June, so dont be looking for it in vain

[ Up the right margin and then across the top margin of page 1 ]

before that time.  Did you ever remember the little candle sticks you bought in Paris for the house in Manchester?  I am

[ Up the right margin and then across the top margin of page 2 ]

using mine -- and it is so nice.  Dont you think the Emerson article looks well? I was thinking about

[ Up the right margin and then across the top margin of page 13]

there being any trouble about your doing it, but I think there couldn't be, for they could use it in a book if

[ Up the right margin and then across the top margin of page 4 ]

they like just as well as ever.  [ deleted words ] I should never have a fear of it --  Pin always said so --  Dear love good night and God bless you.

    Your own Pin.


Notes

1883:  The date 1882 is penciled in the upper right of page 1 in another hand. However, that is not possible, because the letter references events of 1883.  See notes below.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Fuffy:  Fuffy/Fuff, an affectionate nickname for Fields, used by Jewett and Fields. See Correspondents.

plums):  The parenthesis marks appear to have been added in pencil by another hand.

so: Jewett has underlined this word twice.

Sandpiper's:  A nickname among the inner circle of Jewett and Fields for Celia Thaxter. See Correspondents.

Daisy Miller's Dramatization Daisy Miller: A Comedy in Three Acts by Henry James appeared in Atlantic Monthly in April, May and June of 1883.

Emerson article:  Annie Fields's memoir, "Mr. Emerson in the Lecture Room," appeared in Atlantic Monthly, June 1883, pp. 818-32.  This appears to be the same article Jewett first refers to earlier in the letter.
 
The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255).  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Geenleaf Whittier

South Berwick

May 27, [1883]


My dear Friend:

     I was more than glad to get your letter for I had been wishing to hear from you and wishing to write to you, but I have found so many things to do since "I came home" that you have no need to fear that I write too much. If you please, gardening is taking up a great deal of my time, and besides that I have too long neglected my self-imposed duties as inspector of the York and Barvick1 roads and I have had no end of driving to attend to. Who do you suppose came down from Boston on Saturday and spent Sunday with me? Dear A. F.,* for I was moved by a sudden impulse Saturday morning and sent off a telegram, and after­ward thought it would be no use for I manufactured no end of reasons why she could not come. But presently came the answer and it was "Thank you, yes!" at which I was ready to fly with joy. She looked so tired and so white when she came, but I really think the change and a good drive through the woods yesterday did her a great deal of good and sent her home feeling better today. It is cruel to let her stay alone, and I never mean to be away when I can help it, but this is one of the times when I cannot and indeed it is very pleasant to be here, as much as I miss her. Your letter came just after she did so we both enjoyed it, and I expect a great deal of good luck from the four-leaved clovers. I sought diligently for one to retaliate with, but though I am usually fortunate, there was not one to be seen.

     I have not seen the story you speak of though the Littells2 are in a nice brown heap together waiting to be read one evening very soon. I must tell you how much I have been enjoying your Dr. Singletary.3 The description of him reminds me so much of my father that I read it again and again, and it is all very beautiful. Those two volumes are such a storehouse of good things.

     When is the yearly meeting of Friends at Portland?4 I am not going to be disagreeable and to extort a hindering and constraining promise from you, but I do wish to know the time so that I may hide in ambush and lie in wait for you as you go and come! Unless you must say that it will be impossible, and you had better not!

     Goodbye. I have not told you how much I like the poem in the Independent5 or a great deal else, for that matter.

Yours always lovingly,

Sarah


Notes

1  "One curious thing is the pronuncia­tion of the name of the town: Berwick by the elder people has always been called Barvik, after the fashion of Danes and Northmen; never Berrik, as the word has so long been pronounced in modern Eng­land." (Sarah Orne Jewett, "Looking back on Girlhood," Youth's Companion, LXV [January 7, 1892], 5.) See also Miss Jewett's "The Old Town of Berwick," New England Magazine, x (July 1894).

2  An eclectic monthly published in Boston, comprising poems, essays, and stories collected chiefly from British periodicals.

3  Whittier's "My Summer With Dr. Singletary" was first published in the National Era in 1851-1852 and collected in Literary Recreations and Miscellanies (1854). It was reprinted in The Prose Works of John Greenleaf Whittier (Boston, 1865), 2 vols., reissued in 1882, a copy of the last in Miss Jewett's library. Singletary is a congenial, beloved country doctor as was Miss Jewett's father.

4  The meeting that year ran from June 8 through June 13. Whittier did attend "but as is his custom, took no part in the proceedings." (Portland Transcript, June 13, 1883, p. 87.)

5  "What the Traveller Said at Sun­set," Independent, xxxv (May 17, 1883), 609, collected in The Bay of Seven Islands, and Other Poems (1883).

Editor's Notes

A.F.:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

This letter was transcribed and annotated by Richard Cary, and first published in  "'Yours Always Lovingly': Sarah Orne Jewett to John Greenleaf Whittier,"  Essex Institute Historical Collections 107 (1971): 412-50. This article was reprinted at the Sarah Orne Jewett Text Project by permission of the library of the American Antiquarian Society and the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Tuesday noon

[ 1883 - 1886 ]*
Dear darling Fuffs --

    This little note came from dear C.T.* this morning and I will send it right to you -- Do tell me what she says -- I am going over to Exeter this afternoon to see

[ Page 2 ]

my grandfather and perhaps stay until evening -- not over night -- Poor little Fuff being lonely at Nahant! -- but it shall be ever so long before you shall be alone again -- -- I was perfectly

[ Page 3 ]

delighted you could go to the Houghtons* and I am sure they were -- it was a sweet kindness of T.L. --

    I had a distracted little note from Cora* this morning saying that she was called back to town { -- } her mother was dangerous

[ Page 4 ]

ill again -- Kiss dear Rogery* on the top of his smooth head for me -- and Kiss Miss Fuffy Fields in the looking glass and play it was Pin ! Day after tomorrow I shall have you !!

[ Manuscript breaks off.  No signature ]


Notes

1883 - 1886:  This letter almost certainly was composed no earlier than 1883, after Jewett and Fields returned from their first trip to Europe but before January of 1887, when Jewett's grandfather, Dr. William Perry, died.  I have placed in 1883, only because that is the earliest probable composition date.

Fuffs:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. On page three, Jewett uses another of her nicknames for Fields, T.L. See Correspondents.

C.T.:  Celia Thaxter. See Correspondents.

Houghtons: Henry Oscar Houghton. See Correspondents.

Cora: Cora Clark Rice. See Correspondents.

Rogery:  Probably, this is Jewett's dog, Roger, staying with Fields at this time. See "Sarah Orne Jewett's Dog" (1889) for a portrait of Roger.  Roger and Browny/Brownie came to the Jewett household in 1881.  Both are mentioned only in the letter to Eben Norton Horsford of 27 October 1881.  Roger is mentioned more often in letters through possibly 1895.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Monday [ 4 written over 3 ] th June

 [ 1883 ]*

My dearest Fuffy*

It is so good to get your letter and as for thy friend* it is very beautiful. I do wish he would tell me when the yearly meeting of Friends at Portland is! I wrote him again to find out, only telling him that I wished to do something else the other week. I daresay I shall hear tomorrow -- This has been

[ Page 2 ]

a writing day -- and I am going to stop for awhile, for it is no use going [on written over something ] until I have had a run-off and can start on a new track. I must say that nothing is so delightful as the garden. (If the Manchester seeds that I planted have come up as well as these here, you must have a great plantation! (I dont believe a single nasturtium out of the two ounces missed fire -- Mary* gets )(

[ Manuscript breaks off -- no signature. ]

[ up the left margin of page 1]

I found a four leaved clover to send they friend.


Notes

1883: Between the time Jewett and Fields adopted the "Fuffy" nickname and the death of Whittier in 1892, 4 June fell on Monday in 1883 and 1888. In a letter to J. G. Whittier of 27 May 1883, Jewett asks Whittier about the date of the "yearly meeting of the Friends at Portland," as she reports doing in this letter.  Therefore 1883 seems the more likely date for  this fragment.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

Fuffy:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.
    Fields has deleted "Fuffy."

thy friend: Fields has inserted after "friend": "(Whittier", meaning John Greenleaf Whittier. See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

  [June 5] 1883*           

[ I shall be with you in pencil, in another hand, at the top center ]

be with you tomorrow -- your dear birthday.*  How I am looking forward to Thursday evening!  --  I don't care whether there is starlight or a fog --  Yes dear, I will bring the last sketch* and give it its last touches if you think I had better spend any more time on it --  I am tired of writing things --  I want now to paint things and drive things -- and kiss things!  --  and yet I have been thinking all day what a lovely sketch it would be

[ Page 2 ]

to tell the story of the day we went to Morwenstow  --  with bits of Lorna Doone & the Vicar* intertwined with the narrative! --*

    I have been reading Carlyle's Reminiscences -- the Jane Welsh Carlyle* as you may suppose . How could people have made such a fuss about it!  It seems to grow more and more simple and beautiful and human; and Carlyle is like a "great stone face"* on a mountain top.   -- good night, and God bless you dear love.  Yours, always  Pin*


Notes

1883: This note is added in pencil, top right of page 1.  Probably it is correct or at least close. Internal evidence indicates the letter was composed after Jewett and Fields returned from their 1882 trip to Europe.

birthday: Annie Adams Fields was born on 6 June 1834.

last sketch:  Jewett published at least eight stories and essays between August and December of 1883.

Morwenstow  --  with bits of Lorna Doone & the VicarWikipedia says: "Morwenstow is the most northerly parish in Cornwall….  Morwenstow is the one-time home of the eccentric vicar and poet Robert Stephen Hawker (1803–1875), the writer of Cornwall's anthem Trelawny." Jewett recounts her visit to this village in her letter of 2 July 1882, writing her sister Mary about her travels with Mrs. Fields in England. 
    "Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor is a novel by English author Richard Doddridge Blackmore [1825-1900], published in 1869."
    The Vicar of Wakefield (1766) is a novel by the Irish writer Oliver Goldsmith (1728–1774).  Whether Jewett refers to the novel as well as to Vicar Hawker is uncertain.
    Jewett and Fields visited Morwenstow at the beginning of July 1882.

narrative!: Whether Jewett has placed an exclamation point here is uncertain.  The mark is ambiguous.

Carlyle's Reminiscences -- the Jane Welsh Carlyle:  It appears Jewett refers to James Anthony Froude, editor, Letters and Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle, Prepared for Publication by Thomas Carlyle (New York, 1883), 2 vols.  The book received negative commentary because of its frank portrayal of the Carlyles' troubled marriage.

"great stone face":  Jewett compares Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) to the Old Man of the Mountain, also called the Great Stone Face, "a series of five granite cliff ledges on Cannon Mountain in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, United States, that appeared to be the jagged profile of a face when viewed from the north."  This formation collapsed in 2003.

Pin:  Pinny Lawson was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields Transcription
The following transcription of the above letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 17.

[ 1883 ]

    I shall be with you tomorrow. your dear birthday.  How I am looking forward to Thursday evening. I don't care whether there is starlight or a fog.  Yes, dear, I will bring the last sketch and give it its last touches if you think I had better spend any more time on it.  I am tired of writing things.  I want now to paint things and drive things, and kiss things, and yet I have been thinking all day what a lovely sketch it would be to tell the story of the day we went to Morwenstow,  with bits of "Lorna Doone" and "The Vicar" intertwined with the narrative.

    I have been reading Carlyle's Reminiscences -- the Jane Welsh Carlyle, as you may suppose . How could people have made such a fuss about it.  It seems to grow more and more simple and beautiful and human, and Carlyle is like a "great stone face" on a mountain top.  Good night, and God bless you, dear love. 



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Thursday afternoon

[ Summer 1883 - 1886 ]*

Dearest Fuff*

    I thought you were in Boston yesterday! I am afraid you were very hot, for "it" was high above ninety here and only excelled in discomfort by the celebrated Saturday -- But this morning there was a delicious [ north corrected, possibly from east ] wind with a touch of east in it and I have been in the garden picking currants
 

[ Page 2 ]

all the morning long and I had a beautiful time! -- Few persons know that it is very pretty to sit on the ground under a tall currant bush and see the colours of it against the blue sky. ( No Pinny* not to get cold; she mostly was throned on a little box! )(( Mary* has gone down to York to see Hattie Denny* (Poor Uncle William*

[ Page 3 ]

insists again that he wishes to go down -- and I told Mary that now was her chance to have a day and that he could report and probably that would be the last of the plan. He wishes to hire a house & take his Hannah & John & Mary) ( ---- and horses! It is something to talk about at all events.) (I do not hear from Mifs Mitchell*

[ Page 4 ]

but she promised to write me as soon as she knew anything to write. Dear Fuff I send you the "a five", as Mrs. Perkings* says, with many thanks ----  I have got a new book of charming essays by R. L. Stevenson{.}* Mrs. Whitman* spoke of an essay on Villon in it -- when we were talking of that [ deleted letters ] wise one in the Review.*

    I will bring it when I come.

your own S.O.J.)

[ Up the left margin of page 1 ]

Dear Fuff!


Notes

Summer 1883 - 1886:  The precise date of this letter is unknown, but it must have been composed no earlier than the summer of 1883, and while Jewett's Uncle William -- who died in August 1887 -- remained in good enough health to contemplate a move to York.
    Though I have placed the letter in 1883, it may well be from 1-3 years later.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

Mary: Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Hattie Denny: This may be Hattie Denny, sister of Augusta Maria Denny Tyler. See Correspondents.

Uncle William: William Durham Jewett. See Correspondents.

Hannah & John: Hannah Driscoll and John Tucker. See Correspondents.

Mifs Mitchell: This person has not yet been identified. Among Fields's acquaintances was the American astronomer at Vassar College, Maria Mitchell (1818-1889).

Mrs. Perkings:  Mrs. Perkings is Catherine (Mrs. Richard) Perkins, Fields's next-door neighbor at 146 Charles Street.  An anonymous researcher has provided this information about the family.
    Richard Perkins (ca. 1805–6 Dec 1886). In the 1860 census, he and Catherine, his wife, and his brother, Abijah Crane Perkins (23 December 1802-10 August 1884), already lived next door to Annie and James T. Fields.  The men were retired merchants at that time. Richard and Catherine P. Dow (ca. 1828 -29 April 1893) married in Boston on 2 June 1857. 
    Richard and Abijah's parents were William and Nabby Butler Crane Perkins.  Catherine's father was Jones Dow of Lowell, MA.
    In a journal entry of 22 September 1866, Fields describes him as a successful businessman possessed of a "dull kindliness."
    Mrs. Perkings is mentioned in a letter to Fields of November/December 1886, as a country woman despite her urban residence.
    What she means by "a five" is uncertain, but she may refer to a five dollar bill.

R. L. Stevenson:  Scottish author, Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894). His essay "François Villon, Student, Poet, Housebreaker" (1877) was collected in Familiar Studies of Men and Books (1882).
    François Villon (1431- c. 1463) was a French poet.

Mrs. Whitman: Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

wise one in the Review: Perhaps the more likely Stevenson essay is "The Morality of the Profession of Letters," Fortnightly Review ns 157 (April 1881).  Though it was published too early to be current at the probable time of this letter, Whitman still may have spoken of it, and the Jewett circle is known to have read the Fortnightly.
    Stevenson published two other likely essays in The Contemporary Review that almost certainly appeared too late for the probable date of this letter:
    "On Some Technical Elements of Style in Literature," Contemporary Review 47 (April 1885);
    "The Day After Tomorrow," The Contemporary Review 51 (April 1887).
    See Robert Louis Stevenson.org.
    
The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Thursday afternoon

[ June 1883 ]*


This is a lazy loitering Pinny Lawson who came over to the old house directly after dinner to write as fast as she could, but she got hold of the box of her dear T.L's* letters and has been reading one more and one more until a great piece of the afternoon is gone.  Oh my dear darling I had forgotten that we loved each other so much a year ago -- for it all seems so new new* to me every day -- There is so much for us to remember already -- But a

[ Page 2 ]

year ago last winter seems a great way off for we have lived so much since.

    = I have had a hard time of worry and hard work since you went away on Monday. I wish I could be idle all the rest of June, that is not feel forced to do things. But I suppose it cannot be and the only thing possible in a busy life is to rest in ones work since one cannot rest from it.  I think a good deal about the long

[ Page 3 ]

story* but it has not really taken hold of me yet.  I do get so impatient with myself dear Fuffy.  I am always straying off on wrong roads and I am so wicked about things.  This is one of the times when I think despairingly about my faults and see little chance of their ever being mended. -- But Fuffy to have patience with Pin and please to love  her! --

   (I have been reading Under the Olive* a good deal in this last day or two and I cant begin to tell you how beautiful

[ Page 4 ]

it is to me -- and how helpful. 

    I long to hear you read from it again.  And when I think it was my dear little Fuffy who wrote it, it seems quite amazing -- It is like remembering that I have dared to talk nonsense and hug and play generally with something that turned itself into a whole world full of thoughts and sights and beautiful things --  Fuffy and this poet are a funny pair to live in the same skin you know, ladies!  Oh Pinny to go to work!  An idle and thriftless Pinny to whom the rest of the Lawsons are industrious.)*

[ No signature ]


Notes

June 1883:  The date June 1882 is penciled in the upper right of page 1 in another hand.  However, this cannot be correct, as Jewett and Fields were together in Europe in that month.  Jewett dating their friendship from about 18 months earlier suggests that 1883 is the correct composition date.

Pinny Lawson ... T.L.'s:  These are nicknames Jewett and Fields gave to each other.  Jewett announces the invention of these names in a letter to John Greenleaf Whittier of 9 September 1882. Later in the letter, Jewett uses another of her nicknames for Fields: Fuffy.  See Correspondents.

new: Both the deleted word and its apparent substitute are blotted.

long story:  Jewett sometimes used the term "long story" to refer to her novels, notably Deephaven (1877) and The Tory Lover (1901).  The date of this letter suggests she may be working on A Country Doctor (1884).

Under the Olive:  Fields's collection of poems, Under the Olive, appeared in 1881.

industrious.):  The parenthesis that begins on p. 3 and ends here is penciled by another hand.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Lilian Woodman Aldrich

Thursday night [ June 1883 ]

My dear Lilian

    I was a very great pleasure to get your little letter tonight, for I have been thinking about you so much and wishing that I could see you. I have thought every morning that I would write you before the day was done, but I am growing very bad

[ Page 2 ]

about letters! ---- I wish that I knew when I could go to Lynn, but I am sure that it cannot be for two or three weeks yet. There are a good many reasons for being here just now, and I know that I shall have to go away by and by when the very hot weather comes,

[ Page 3 ]

so I am making the most of this delightful June ^in Berwick^ -- have been gardening and writing and doing all sorts of things and we have been giving our minds and hearts to various visitors -- two young cousins of mine are here just now chattering like magpies up-stairs ---- I keep thinking about Manchester you may be sure, and of that beautiful

[ Page 4 ]

hilltop -- where poor Mrs. Fields* is lonelier and sadder than anybody can guess.  I shall go back there by and by, and then I shall be sure to see you.  You and his Grace* are going there soon, aren't you? I think that is something she cares a great deal about, and she wrote me in such joy because his Grace liked the poem.* She sent it to me in a letter and I was going to tell you about it -- it was

[ Page 5 ]

so lovely -- and then I found you knew ----

    It was a most dear Duchess who got the spoon! and I love it already. Only today I was thinking about the lost one -- -- I wish I could see you instead of trying to write a letter to you, but we will have a blessed long gossip one day before

[ Page 6 ]

long. Do give my love to Mrs. Aldrich,* and to all the household. Has Tal* dared to grow any more? and how is the Dearest love? Tell Charley I miss having him for an opposite neighbor.

Yours affectionately
Miss Martinot*

(Now of the Bijou T.C.)

[ Up the left margin of page 1 ]

If you ever go to McCarthy's will you get me one of those china trays with the little fences round them that we bought at Leonards? He must have some left!


Notes

June 1883: This speculative date is supported by a little evidence.  Jewett's reference to Fields's loneliness suggests that she writes relatively soon after the death of James T. Fields in April 1881.  Other letters indicate that Jewett did spend most of June 1883 in South Berwick or visiting nearby. The apparent reference to Sadie Martinot performing in Boston corresponds with her early July 1883 appearances at the Bijou (see below). 
    One problem with this date is that Martinot probably appeared several more times in Boston during the later 1880s, as well as at the Bijou Theatre in New York.

his Grace:  The Aldriches were affectionately known among their friends as the Duke and Duchess of Ponkapog. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

the poem: If this letter is from June 1883, then Jewett may refer to Fields's poem, "The Folding," which appeared in Harper's Magazine in June 1883 and was collected in The Singing Shepherd (1895).

Mrs. Aldrich: Thomas Bailey Aldrich's mother was Sarah Abba/Abra Bailey (1814-1896); she married Elias Taft Aldrich (1807-1850).

Tal: The Aldriches' had twins born in 1868: Charles and Talbot.

Miss Martinot: Sadie Martinot was a Jewett nickname with the Aldriches, presumably after the American actress and singer, Sarah/Sadie Martinot. See Correspondents.

Bijou T.C.:  The transcription of the initials is uncertain; perhaps she means Theatre Company?  Or perhaps it should read O.C. for Opera Company.  There was a Bijou theater in Boston after 1882 and in New York after 1878. 
    According to the Historical Review of the Boston Bijou Theatre, Sadie Martinot appeared in the casts of two Collier's Standard Opera Company Productions at the Boston Bijou in 1883, Patience by Gilbert and Sullivan, July 2-7, and The Mascot by Edmond Audrain, July 9-13.

McCarthy's ... Leonards:  J. C. McCarthy was a department store at the corner of Tremont and West Streets, Boston.  Leonards is more difficult to identify.  There was a Leonard's Gallery in Boston in the 1880s, which appears to have specialized in fine art, but may have sold craft items as well. More likely, Leonard's was a store not in Boston, but nearer another location, such as the area of Beverly and Manchester-by-Sea, where the Aldriches and Annie Fields spent their summers.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Baily Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College. At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2665. The same note appears at the bottom left of page 5.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


Thursday night

[ 26 June 1883 ]*

My dearest Fuffy

    I have just come home from Exeter where we had a most successful occasion.  I shall tell you all about it -- sometime, but you will easily imagine it all for yourself --the old classmates having such a beautiful time together and Mother and [ nice ? ]

[ Page 2 ]

aunt Marys* finding very greyheaded beaux and reminding each other of old times -- Today there was a grand dinner in such a big tent! -- Pinny to go, and to be set in a pretty situation on account of the virtue of her forbears and Mr. Bancroft* presided nobly and Ben Butler* made a truly eloquent speech, the best he could do, and Pres.

[ Page 3 ]

Eliot followed in one that went on, most eloquently also -- from where B.B. left off, and though the Governor was greatly applauded Prest Eliot was applauded three times as much. ( * Mr. Geo. S. Hale* made a very fine speech -- one of the very best and that is saying a great deal,  and there was such a clapping and

[ Page 4 ]

stamping as never was. Dr. Peabody also was good and great, and Pinny had a most uncommon good ^time^ particularly when her dear grandpapa was speaked about and was clapped and racketted at as much as anyone.  Such a noise about him! and he sat there looking so pleased and bright, but as if he were a visitor from the other world of his own day and generation,

[ Page 4 ]

and was a solitary being among the great crowd of two thousand  --  two thousand!  I don't know how many more, for they gathered and gathered after the dinner was over and the speeches began.

    I [ should corrected ] have hated to be one of the little men among the crowd of great Exeter boys dead and alive!  Last night there was a speech making too, and a bonfire

[ Page 5 ]

and hullabaloo afterward (to which Pinny ran --) and this morning she went to see dear old Prof. Packard who was her fathers friend and she went to see her Aunt Helen who had come from Portland with Uncle John,* and in fact she ran about town a good deal.  She wore her little Paris dress with the lace yesterday & today until the dinner, when she appeared in

[ Page 6 ]

the white one with the bonnet and ^the little red silk shawl, and^ was considered by her mother to be a very black Pinny, but we will hope a comely Pinny as well.

           ( -- I wish* I had you here dearest Fuff  --  for when we got home (Mary & I) we heard that Carrie was not very well, so Mary went right up there to stay, as Mr. Eastman is still in Exeter.*  I hope to

[ Page 7 ]

get Carrie off to the sea before very long -- at least I am trying hard to achieve it --  I am in the midst of high society life for there is to be a big wedding in church!  here this ^next^ week and Pinny a front seat!  It is one of the Burleighs,* but Fuff doesnt know her --  Oh Fuffy, there is no Wizard's Son* this week either, what shall we do? ----- Dear dear little girl -- I wish you did

[ Page 8 ]

feel like the Italian class -- there will be Pinny to teach again next time we go -- ladies, and Fuffy should think of it.  And you need not go every week  --  & perhaps  --  but I will not tease you because you know best, my darling.

            How is Roger?*  I suppose he is all right and makes big mud tracks on the clean floor  --  and is just the same as ever, but I like to know -- )*  I look

[ Page 9 ]

forward always to having you again and being with you -- it is so lovely, and I shut my eyes and look all about -- at the rock* and down into the orchard and out to sea.  And I want to hear somebody say yes, when I say Fuf-fy!  which doesn't happen now. --  And Pin just said it out loud to see, because she is alone too -- you know. ( --  Mrs. John Phillips was staying with Aunt Mary Bell* and was very nice.  I saw a good deal

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 9 ]

of her --  How nice about Sandpiper!*  Good night darling  --  from Pin.)

 Notes

26 June 1883:  This is the Tuesday following the Phillips Exeter Academy celebration mentioned in the letter.

Fuffy
: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

the Aunt Marys:  Aunt Mary Bell is mentioned later in this letter.  The other probably is Mary Olivia Gilman Long. See Correspondents.

Pinny: Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.    See Correspondents.

( :  This deleted parenthesis mark was almost certainly penciled in by Annie Fields.

Mr. Bancroft ... Ben Butler ... Pres. Eliot ... the Governor ... Mr. Geo. S. Hale ... Dr. Peabody:  Established by John Phillips (1719-1795) in 1781, the Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, NH graduated its first class in 1783.  A centennial celebration took place on June 20-21, 1883.
    The speakers on the first evening, Wednesday, included: New Hampshire governor, Benjamin F. Prescott (1833-1895) and  the Principal of Phillips Academy at Andover, MA, Cecil F. P. Bancroft.  On Thursday afternoon, the speakers included: the historian and statesman George Bancroft (1800-1891), the retired president of Harvard University, Rev. Andrew Preston Peabody (1811-1893), Massachusetts governor, Benjamin F. Butler (1818-1893), the current president of Harvard University, Charles William Eliot (1834-1926), and the philanthropist George Silsbee Hale (1825-1897). Hale would be well-known to Fields, who worked with him at the Associated Charities of Boston.
    Academy founder, John Phillips married into the Gilman side of Jewett's family.

old Prof. Packard ... Aunt Helen ... with Uncle John:  Professor Alpheus S. Packard, (1798-1884), an academy alumnus, delivered one of the Wednesday evening addresses at the centennial celebration.  
    For Helen Williams Gilman and John Taylor Gilman see Correspondents.

wish: The parenthesis mark at the beginning of this paragraph almost certainly was penciled in by Annie Fields.

Mary ... Carrie .. Mr Eastman: Mary Rice Jewett, Caroline Jewett Eastman and Edwin Eastman.  See Correspondents.

one of the Burleighs:  Jewett was acquainted with the prominent Burleigh family of South Berwick.  Matilda Burleigh was the widow of a mill owner and Maine congressman, John Holmes Burleigh (1822-1877).  See Wikipedia.
    Their daughter was Sarah Elizabeth Burleigh (1863-1937), who married James Thomas Davidson (1856-1901) on July 3, 1883.

Wizard's Son Margaret Oliphant  (1828-1897) was the popular Scottish author of The Wizard's Son (1884).  The novel was serialized in Macmillan's Magazine, November 1882 through March 1884 (v. 47-9).  According to E. James in Macmillan: A Publishing Tradition, 1843-1970, complications and disagreements about the serialization led to irregularities in the novel's serialization in the British monthly (pp. 95-7).  However, Jewett seems to be referring to the late arrival of the current issue.

Roger: Jewett's dog.

know:  The parenthesis mark here looks to have been penciled in by Fields, as do those in the remaining portion of the letter.

-- at the rock: It is not clear whether this dash was written by Jewett or by Fields.

Mrs. John Phillips: Probably this is the wife of John Charles Phillips (1838-1885), who was descended from the founder of the Phillips Exeter Academy.  She was Anna T. Tucker Phillips (1849-1925).

Sandpiper:  Celia Thaxter.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Sunday 1 July
[ 1883 ]*


Dear F- )    I have just finished a longer than usual send to send to the Linnet* which is a great satisfaction -- It is all about my morning ramble and I wish I could read it to you. I believe Fuff* would like it -- I am so anxious to get some of my stories done, but though I have worked very hard they aren't very easily persuaded -- I have finished one or two things which I shouldn't like to read to you so I gave them up -- If I could get one long story done I would ^not^ touch my pen and half sheets again for a month ---- It's an awful

[ Page 2 ]

drag to write on and one, month after month much as I like it -- but darling you know I cant stop just now -- I have got a good way into a tale which has several nice people in it -- a story not unlike the Mate of the Daylight* in its surroundings and it keeps me thinking about it a great deal --

    It has been a beautiful cool bright day -- and we would have gone to the Dana place* again if I had been at Manchester. I have thought so often of that lovely walk (with my dear little girl, and)

[ Manuscript breaks off.  No signature. ]


Notes

1883:  This date is confirmed by Jewett almost certainly referring to "The Confession of a House-Breaker," which was published in 1883.
    Fields has penciled a note at the upper right: "188--".  She has deleted the greeting.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

Linnet: Thomas Bailey Aldrich. See Correspondents.
    Almost certainly, Jewett has sent him "The Confession of a House-Breaker," which appeared anonymously in the Atlantic Monthly Contributors Club column in September 1883.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mate of the Daylight:  Jewett's "The Mate of the Daylight" appeared in Atlantic in July 1882.  While it is difficult to know which story Jewett was working on with a similar setting, if she published it, a likely title would be "An Only Son," which appeared in Atlantic in November 1883.

Dana place: Almost certainly this is Richard Henry Dana III, whose family maintained a summer home in Manchester by the Sea, MA. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


 
SOJ to John Geenleaf Whittier


South Berwick

Thursday evening

[July 5, 1883

Dear Friend:

     Your letter has just reached me here, and I can only say that I still hope to reach Holderness1 and that A. F.* will go too. I shall have to stay here for the present as my mother and sister will both be away but the very first chance I can get, I shall try again to make the little visit at the Asquam House to which I have so long been looking forward. It was well that we did not start in the great heat of last week perhaps, but I was much disappointed. I went over to Manchester hoping to start next morning.

     It seems to be a great sorrow to our dear friend to stay at Man­chester, and neither can she bear to be away, though she seemed to care very much to see you. I stay with her every minute that I can get, but of course at this time of the year I often ought to be here. She is better contented while I am staying with her, but every letter almost makes my heart ache with the story of her miserable loneliness whether she tells it or I only "read between the lines." I am dreadfully troubled sometimes, for in spite of everything it seems as if it were harder and harder for her just to be alive. And there are still so many things to please her and comfort her. The only thing is to keep as close to her as we can and love her all we can. I do truly love her, but I pity her as I would pity a little child that has been run over and hurt, and yet has to get up and keep on its way.

     But I must not write only of this sadness. I wish to tell you how glad I am that you are feeling better at Holderness, and that tomorrow morning early Mary* and I are to start for Portsmouth and the Shoals where we are going to spend the night with the Sandpiper.* Saturday night Mary is going on to my aunt's summer place at Little Boar's Head2 where she will spend a week or two. Mother is going to Wells on Monday and I am going to write as fast as I can and keep house for myself, though perhaps I shall have Mrs. Rice* here for a day or two. I shall send your note to Annie Fields so she will read it too, and you will see us coming one of these days.

Yours lovingly,

Sarah

 
Notes

1  A summer resort village in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Whittier was staying at a new hotel on the peak of Shepard Hill which afforded a magnificent view of the several lakes in its vicinity. The scene inspired his poems "The Hill-Top" and "Storm on Lake Asquam." On July 10 Whittier sent Miss Jewett directions on how to come "two ways," by steamer or by railroad. (Cary, "More Whittier Letters," p. 133.)

2  Site of many beautiful summer residences in southeastern New Hampshire. Miss Jewett's maternal family was native to this area.

Editor's Notes

A.F.:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Sandpiper: Celia Thaxter.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Rice:  Probably Cora Clark Rice. See Correspondents.

This letter was transcribed and annotated by Richard Cary, and first published in  "'Yours Always Lovingly': Sarah Orne Jewett to John Greenleaf Whittier,"  Essex Institute Historical Collections 107 (1971): 412-50. This article was reprinted at the Sarah Orne Jewett Text Project by permission of the library of the American Antiquarian Society and the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum.



SOJ to Lilian Woodman Aldrich

[ Begin letterhead, in small caps ]

Gambrel Cottage
Manchester by the Sea
                Mass.

[ End letterhead ]

5th July -- [ 1883 ]*

Dear Duchess -- *

    I am so entirely delighted with my new spoon that I should like to keep an end of it in my mouth and be reasonably certain of a brilliant future -- I dont doubt that it gave you a sad pang to part with it, even though it

[ Page 2 ]

was for Sadie* who loves you and it so much I cant [ think corrected ] of giving it away even in my will -- In return I am going to take you some day, if you will be taken, to a new old furniture shop where the man is at present unequal to imagining McCarty's* prices and where I think you can

[ Page 3 ]

find jolly crockery if not some chests of [ deleted word ] ^drawers^ of cherry wood with good brass handles --

    You see I am here again and I came last night (through not matching my trains aright) at such a late hour that I had to throw stones at T.L's* window to wake her up -- we had such a jolly time and could hardly let

[ Page 4 ]

ourselves go to sleep at all --

    We are expecting to go to the mountains tomorrow to make thy friend* a two or three days visit, but it is not quite decided{.}

    We both have been talking and talking about you and the Duke -- If I had ^not^ been sure you were away I should have gone over to Lynn and spent the night with you. That would only have been half past eight, so

[ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 1 ]

you would not have heard me under your window as T. L. did -- I haven't begun to give you the spoon full of thanks but good-bye from

your loving Sadie

[ Up the left margin and down the top margin of page 3 ]

How lovely the letter to Portsmouth was! is! and dear T.F. carries it about in her pocket and is so glad because she has it -- I do want to see you dreadfully.


Notes

1883:  Richard Cary dates a letter from Jewett to J. G. Whittier on 5 July 1883, in which she speaks of visiting him in Holderness, NH, among the White Mountains, where Whittier often spent part of his summer.

Duchess: Nickname for Lilian Aldrich among her close friends; she and her husband were the Duke and Duchess of Ponkapog. See Correspondents.

Sadie: Sadie Martinot was a Jewett nickname with the Aldriches, presumably after the American actress and singer, Sarah/Sadie Martinot. See Correspondents.

McCarty's: This business has not been identified.  Perhaps Jewett meant to write McCarthy. J. C. McCarthy was a department store at the corner of Tremont and West Streets, Boston.

T.L.:  A nickname for Annie Adams Fields, used by Jewett and Fields, beginning in 1882. See Correspondents.

thy friend: A nickname for John Greenleaf Whittier, used by his close friends. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Baily Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2660.


 SOJ to John Geenleaf Whittier

 Home [South Berwick]

July 20, [1883

Dear Friend:

     I meant to have told you yesterday that I reached here all right, and that I feel a great deal better and richer for the journey. I find myself remembering that beautiful view of the lakes and the mountain slopes, and thinking of them over and over again. I think it did Mrs. Fields a great deal of good too. We had a most lovely drive in the early morning and the sail on Winnipesaukee was most marvellously beautiful. The sky over the Italian Lakes themselves never was a more delicate colour.1 Yesterday morning I drove to York and brought Mrs. Rice* and her little boy back with me, and I enjoyed that very much, both the drive and my company for the country is as green as England. I saw the Longfellows2 who were glad to hear about you. They are going abroad this autumn to study in Oxford, and next summer are going to make Mrs. Ole Bull a visit in Norway.*

     Do give my love to your dear cousins3 and Mrs. Caldwell4 for I enjoyed seeing them so much, and shall look forward to seeing them again.

Yours always most lovingly,

Sarah

 
Notes

1 Miss Jewett and Mrs. Fields respond­ed to Whittier's appeal, came and stayed about a week. He wrote to both in this same vein: "The place was, I think, never so beautiful. . . . Such a sunset the Lord never before painted" (Pickard, Life and Letters, II, 688); and even more telepathi­cally to Miss Jewett on July 20, "The day was beautiful -- the sunset would have been the despair of a painter. I think I never before saw such a picture of God." (Cary, "More Whittier Letters," p. 133.)

2 Probably William Pitt Preble Long­fellow (1836-1913), son of the poet's brother Stephen, who married Emily Daniell of Boston in 1870. An engineer and architect, he studied and traveled abroad extensively. He was the first editor of the American Architect and a trustee of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

3  Joseph Cartland (1810-1898) and Gertrude Cartland (1822-1911), who ac­companied Whittier on his summer vaca­tions in Maine and New Hampshire for five decades, and in whose home at New­buryport, Massachusetts, he lived most of his last fifteen winters.

4  Adelaide Caldwell, wife of Whittier's nephew Lewis, was noted for her sparkling personality at family gatherings.

Editor's Notes

Mrs. Rice:  Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Ole Bull:  Sara Chapman Thorp Bull (1850-1911) the widow of famed Norwegian violinist Ole Bull (1810-1880); she lived near the Horsfords at 168 Brattle Street in Cambridge.  Apparently she sometimes summered at her husband's home in Norway.

This letter was transcribed and annotated by Richard Cary and first published in  "'Yours Always Lovingly': Sarah Orne Jewett to John Greenleaf Whittier,"  Essex Institute Historical Collections 107 (1971): 412-50. This article was reprinted at the Sarah Orne Jewett Text Project by permission of the library of the American Antiquarian Society and the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum.



SOJ to John Greenleaf Whittier

South Berwick 
Wednesday
   [Summer 1883 ]

Dear Friend,

    I was so glad to get your letter but almost sorry to find that you had come back to this part of the country at what I am afraid is the beginning of a dry hot time.  Do be careful, and run back again if you find yourself feeling the change too much.

    It was certainly a very bracing air at Asquam.*  I felt so much better for the barely two days I was in the region.  I have been meaning to write you again and to send you this hymn (which you must have thought was forgotten){.}  One copy is for your cousin Mrs. Cartland* -- which I would have sent her myself if I had been sure of her address.  I have been very busy indeed since I came home for we have had visitors and part of the time I was house keeping alone.  and then I went down to Little Boar's Head to stay with my cousins the Bells and Gilmans* and stole one night from them to go over to Manchester.*  I came away early in the morning, but it was a most lovely evening.  Mrs. Claflin* was there and I was glad to see her.  I am later in going over to stay than I meant to be but it cannot very well be helped and I can be there later into September perhaps.  I hope still to get to Manchester by the fourteenth or fifteenth.

    I have been writing whenever I could get a chance, and just now it is a story which I think you will like.  I called it An Only Son,* and the people are Deacon Price and his son Warren who has disheartened him by spending all his time to no purpose in experimenting with machinery.  There is an old Captin who has left the sea and taken to farming whom I am enjoying.  The story is not done yet however and it will be only a short one.  I think my wings must be hen's wings.  I cant take long flights{,} only over a fence here and there.  Mary* sends her love to you and so do I.

                            Yours ever
                                 Sarah

Notes

Asquam: Now called Squam Lake, Lake Asquam is "in the Lakes Region of central New Hampshire, United States, south of the White Mountains, straddling the borders of Grafton, Carroll, and Belknap counties. The largest town center on the lake is Holderness."

Mrs. Cartland:  Richard Cary says: "Joseph Cartland (1810-1898) and Gertrude Cartland (1822-1911), ... ac­companied Whittier on his summer vaca­tions in Maine and New Hampshire for five decades, ... in whose home at New­buryport, Massachusetts, he lived most of his last fifteen winters."
    The hymn mentioned here is not yet known. 

Bells and Gilmans:  In Sarah Orne Jewett: her World and her Work (2002), Paula Blanchard notes that Jewett frequently visited aunts, uncles and cousins at the shore in Rye, NH.  Among those present usually were her great aunts, Mary Bell and Mary Long (p. 31).
     A number of Jewett's Gilman relatives appear in Correspondents.

Manchester:  Manchester-by-the-Sea, location of the summer home of Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Claflin:  Mary Bucklin Davenport Claflin. See Correspondents.

An Only Son:  Jewett mentions the main characters in her story, "An Only Son," which appeared in Atlantic Monthly 52 (November 1883).

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, folder 63, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


  Sunday evening

[ Summer 1883 ]*



Dear Mary

                 What a cool lovely weather we are having!  I wish it had come while Alice* was here though we had a great dust storm before the rain yesterday and a big wind that snapped off a great bough of the maple by Carrie's* front door -- it proved to have been rotting down into the cleft and might have fallen on somebody so lets be thankful it didn't.  Annie* rose the garret stairs and shut the windows and scuttle while I was down here so we didn't get so much dust as we otherwise might.  And then came the most lovely long and big shower so that the garden is all as fresh as can be.  I wish you could see it.  I have not regularly walked the piece but have seen the vegatable [ so transcribed ] part twice on Princess'* account.  She is doing nicely.  I went to the Dennetts, partly on Dicky's account* this afternoon and he seemed to be indifferent to the pleasures of the occasion.  I drove the first part of the time and then gave the reins to Charles* and I hoped he might be brisker coming home, but no Mary, your Dicky had lost a Shoe and so Charles didn't think it best to urge him, and it took us a good while but I enjoyed it and feel much obliged by the lending.  Tomorrow shall be Jane's Day. *

            John* is doing nicely.  I called after Church this morning and then I went into Carries to dinner, and we ate no end of a proper watermelon, and I stayed until I went to drive.  Carrie and I broke the sabbath* rearranging some of her books.   She and Theodore went out with Susan.*  I asked John if it wouldn't do to put Dicky in the light double wagon but I wasn't let….

            There was a piece about John in the Free Press and Mr. Sewall* has called again.  So all is well.  I am going now to make my evening call.  The girls are well.  Annie requested Longfellow's poems to read about Martha Wentworth* and then passed the afternoon over the Rambles about Portsmouth to her great satisfaction.  Mr. Lewis has gone to Gorham* and a funny little man preached.  I dont know who he was. A pleasant Sister cant think of anymore to say but sends much love to you and to both Aunt Marys.*

                                                                        Yours affectionately

                                                                                                         Sarah

 

Notes

Summer 1883:  This highly speculative date is based  upon Jewett speaking of her horse, Princess, who was mentioned in an 1882 letter.  As Jewett was in Europe in summer and autumn of 1882, I have tentatively placed this letter in the following year.

Alice:  Jewett had several close friends named Alice.  Without more information, it is difficult to determine which one has been visiting.  Perhaps Alice Greenwood Howe?  See Correspondents.

Carrie:  Caroline Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.

Annie:  A Jewett family employee.  More information is welcome.

Princess:  It appears Jewett has been finding treats for a Jewett horse in the vegetable garden, perhaps carrots?  Jewett mentions this horse in a letter of 17 August 1882, writing from Europe, indicating that she misses this horse.

Charles:  Which Charles this may be from among Jewett's acquaintance remains a mystery.  As he is driving a Jewett horse, it appears he may be an employee, but he is not mentioned in other Jewett letters known at the time of this editing.

Dennetts ... on Dicky's account:  It appears Jewett has taken a long drive to the Dennett farm, which Pirsig, in The Placenames of South Berwick (p. 210), identifies as the "oldest continuously operated family farm" in the area.  Dicky seems to be a horse belonging to Mary Rice Jewett.

Jane:  Another Jewett family horse, perhaps referred to in other letters as Jane Ann.

John:  John Tucker, who appears to be indisposed, which may account for Charles working as a driver. See Correspondents.

broke the sabbath: See Exodus 20: 8-11. The fourth of the the 10 Commandments says that no one in the household should do any work on the seventh day of the week.

Susan:  This cannot be certain, but a Jewett cousin living in South Berwick was Susan Jameson Jewett (1857-1954).  Her mother was named Sarah Orne Jewett (1820-1864), as was a sister who died in infancy (1864-5).  See Pirsig, "The Jewetts of Portland Street" (2004).

piece about John in the Free Press and Mr. Sewall:  The publication about John Tucker has not been located.  Assistance is welcome. 
    Mr. Sewall is likely a Jewett neighbor, Jotham Sewall (1847-1922). See Pirsig, The Placenames of South Berwick, p. 75.  His sister, also a regular visitor, was Helen D. Sewall (1845-1922).  Another sister in the same household was Jane Sewall.  The Sewell Genealogy says: 
Rev. Jotham Sewall was born on 21 March 1847 in Robbinston, Maine. He was the son of Rev. David Brainerd Sewall and Mary Drummond. Rev. Jotham Sewall appears on the census of 1870 at the Theological Seminary, Bangor, Maine, though his age is given as 28 in the return. He appears on the census of 1900 at South Berwick, Maine, where his occupation is noted as that of a musician. His passport application in 1905 refines his occupation to that of an organist. He appears on the census of 1910 at South Berwick, Maine, living together with his sisters Jane and Helen. He died on 20 November 1932 at the age of 85 and is buried in First Parish Cemetery of York, Maine.
Longfellow's poems to read about Martha Wentworth ... Rambles about Portsmouth:  The American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882), wrote "Lady Wentworth" about Martha Wentworth, second wife of Benning Wentworth (1696 - 1770), the colonial governor of New Hampshire (1741 - 1766).  This marriage was something of a scandal in part because she was much younger, but probably more because she had been Wentworth's housekeeper and, by marrying him, rose to the aristocracy.
    Charles W. Brewster (1802-1869) wrote Rambles about Portsmouth, collections of newspaper columns about the history and personalities of Portsmouth, NH.  See Dennis Robinson, "Charles W. Brewster."

Mr. Lewis has gone to Gorham:  Pastor George Lewis. See Correspondents.

both Aunt Marys:  Women whom Jewett addressed as "Aunt Mary" included: Mary Olivia Gilman Long and Mary E. Gray (Mrs. Charles) Bell.  See Mary Long in Correspondents.  Mary Rice Jewett, then, is apparently at Little Boar's Head in Rye, MA.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


 SOJ to John Geenleaf Whittier

 South Berwick

October 24, [1883]

Dear Friend:

     I was so glad to get your letter, and it was so good of you to tell me that you liked the Dunluce poem.1 I did not see the proof of it or I should have proved myself a better workman, for some things stare me in the face in a very distressing way. I always find that my first-instinc­tive word is so much better than any I can think of afterward! But it did me no end of good to think you liked it, and I wish we could whisk through the air and go through Dunluce Castle together --  though not on such a windy day as the one when I was there before; we had to go across a narrow bit of wall that was the only bridge across the deep ravine. When I think of that amazing ruin I almost feel capable of writing a robber or a huntsman story that would put my dead friend Mayne Reid2 to his trumps.

     I was "moved" up from Manchester with my dog Roger two weeks ago tomorrow and our last days there were very pleasant ones, for we (A. F.* and I) drove or walked a great deal. One day we went to Coffin's Beach* which I had never seen before, and we took a last look at Essex which I have quite fallen in love with. It is all afloat when the tide is in, like a little Venice, and the shipwrights' hammers knock at the timbers all day long, as if all the ghosts of departed shipbuilders from all along shore were chiming in with the real ones. I have been thinking a good deal about a longish story to be called A Marsh Island3 and I have had beautiful times going to Essex to see about it. I haven't made the first scratch at a sheet of paper yet, but it is well begun.

     We hoped you would be coming in some day at breakfast time but I shall be sure to see you when I go to town again. I don't think it will [be] a great while first -- for Master Roger* is so homesick and he and the other big dog squabble so that there is no living with them. They have been "only children" too long! Ann (the old cook)4 says that Roger is "like a mon from our place that wint away over into Scotland for six weeks and when he come back he didn't know his mother's cat, nor what she was at all annyway!" He seemed to be quite bewildered and strange, poor Roggy!

     Mary* sends her love to you, and so do I. I have read Miss Phelps's book5 and I think most of it is very beautiful and though the sillinesses of it hurt one a little, there's ever so much to be thankful for, and I know it will do good and make vague things real to many people. Goodbye.

Yours always,

Sarah

 
Notes

1 "Dunluce Castle," Harper's, LXVII (November 1883), 924; collected in Verses (1916). On October 20 Whittier had written to praise Miss Jewett's "admirable little poem." (Cary, "Whittier Letters," p. 15.) In these six quatrains she delineates the ruined domain of the first Marquis of Antrim which she noted on her visit to Dunluce on the northernmost coast of Ireland.

2  Thomas Mayne Reid (1818-1883), Irish-born son of a Presbyterian minister, came to the United States at twenty in search of adventure. After a varied career as storekeeper, Negro overseer, schoolmaster, actor, and journalist, he began to turn out volumes of thrilling exploits for adults and for boys.

3  A Marsh Island was serialized in the Atlantic Monthly, January-June 1885, and published later that year in book form. Essex County is the northeastern coastal corner of Massachusetts from Saugus to Newburyport, extending inland to Lawrence and Haverhill. The section Miss Jewett particularly liked was dominated by the tidewater which formed a web of creeks and channels through miles of salt marsh. See Cary, S. O. J. Letters, pp. 56­-57.

4 Ann Rogers was one of the several immigrant Irish servants who lived in the Jewett household during Sarah's lifetime.

5  Elizabeth Stuart Phelps [Ward], Beyond the Gates (Boston, 1883). In this story of a woman who thinks she dies and goes to heaven, Miss Phelps tried to recapture the popular favor she won with The Gates Ajar (1868).

Editor's Notes

A.F.:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Coffin's BeachWikipedia notes: "Wingaersheek Beach is a 0.6-mile ... long beach located on the Annisquam River in West Gloucester, Massachusetts, United States.... The beach was alternatively called Coffins Beach for Peter Coffin whose farm was located alongside this beach."

Master Roger:  For Jewett's sketch of her Irish setter, see her letter to Gertrude Van Rensselaer Wickham of August 29, 1886.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

 This letter was transcribed and annotated by Richard Cary, and first published in  "'Yours Always Lovingly': Sarah Orne Jewett to John Greenleaf Whittier,"  Essex Institute Historical Collections 107 (1971): 412-50. This article was reprinted at the Sarah Orne Jewett Text Project by permission of the library of the American Antiquarian Society and the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum.


SOJ to John Geenleaf Whittier

South Berwick

October 30, [1883

My dear Friend:

     Thank you so much for sending me your new book.1 I sat down to read it at once and I thought I knew most of it, so I would look for the new poems, but I found they were all new -- and more beautiful and true than any words of mine can say. I cannot thank you enough for the books which have grown dearer and more helpful to me year by year -- as I have grown older.

     I have just seen an empty cover of my new book2, which will be going to you before long, with everything finished outside and in. I hope I shall tell you by and by that I have finished a longer story, but I don't dare to make any promises! Did I tell you that I fell in love with Essex? I thought I should embark on a long bit of gossip about that neighbourhood, but it doesn't seem to have bones enough yet, for a story.

     I hope to see and hear Matthew Arnold3 and so I may go to town next week for a day and night. I hear that "The Sandpiper"* has gone back to her winter perch. I like to think of you at Amesbury. Somehow it seems a great deal nearer than Danvers, and I can almost say good morning.4 I have just come in from a drive over the windy hills to Dover, and it is pleasant to see the farms, and meet the barrels of apples riding out. I should think the shiny outdoors things would hate to spend their latter days in country cellars -- such as were not bound for John Wentworth's cider mill!5

Yours lovingly,

Sarah

 
Notes

1 The Bay of Seven Islands, and Other Poems was issued in October 1883. Of the twenty-two poems it contains, seventeen were previously published. Miss Jewett may mean that they were all new to her.

2 The Mate of the Daylight, and Friends Ashore is dated 1884 but was copyrighted and issued in 1883. Dedicated "To A.F.," it is a collection of eight short stories mostly from the Atlantic Monthly.

3 During his lecture tour of the United States, October 1883 - March 1884, Mat­thew Arnold stayed for some time at Mrs. Fields's house in Boston. Miss Jewett fondly remembered him sitting at the fireside reading his "The Scholar Gipsy." Although Whittier held Arnold's writings in high esteem and "would like exceedingly to meet" him, he thought it little likely that he could get into town on time. However, Miss Jewett and Mrs. Fields prevailed on him to the extent that Whittier had lunch on Thanksgiving Day or shortly thereupon with the British celebrity. See Cary, "Whittier Letters," p. 15.

4 Amesbury, Massachusetts, is approximately thirty-five miles due south of South Berwick, Maine; Danvers, Massachusetts, some twenty-five miles farther south.

5 The area between Dover, New Hampshire, and South Berwick, Maine -- a distance of some seven miles -- might well be called Wentworth country. The famous Wentworth Manor is in Salmon Falls nearby, and numerous descendants of the Wentworth clan made their homes in the vicinity. The family was prominent for its governors, divines, philanthropists, Indian fighters, and tavern hosts.

Editor's Notes

Sandpiper: Celia Thaxter.  See Correspondents.

This letter was transcribed and annotated by Richard Cary, and first published in  "'Yours Always Lovingly': Sarah Orne Jewett to John Greenleaf Whittier,"  Essex Institute Historical Collections 107 (1971): 412-50. This article was reprinted at the Sarah Orne Jewett Text Project by permission of the library of the American Antiquarian Society and the Phillips Library at the Peabody Essex Museum.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Wednesday

[ November/December 1883 ]*

Dear Fuff* I did have the most beautiful time yesterday afternoon -- I feel as if I had seen another country in Europe, oh a great deal better than that! though I only went wandering over a great tract of pasture-land down along the river -- You would think it were ^is^ such a lonely place, and I shall have to write about it one of these days, for

[ Page 2 ]

I saw so many things -- I never had known any thing beyond the edges of it before. It was the sweetest weather in the world and Rogery went --

    But last night there was a dismal time, for the two bowwows got into the parlor together and first thing I knew there was a pitched

[ Page 3 ]

battle, and I was afraid the lamps and everything would be tipped over before I could get hold of anybody's collar. And Roger passed a suffering night with a lame paw and broke my rest all to pieces with his whining, and Browny's ear was damaged and dogs are at a discount!* (I must

[ Page 4 ]

run to the post office with this or you wont get it tonight -- Dear darling I hope you will feel like going to the lecture but I see that Mr Arnold* cant be heard easily -- so perhaps you would only see him! Dont get tired dear and you know I am going to you [ so corrected ] soon now

your own Pin.* )

We hear a rumour of Butlers defeat* -- and I hope it is true --

Notes

November/December 1883:  This tentative date is based upon Jewett indicating that Fields is expecting to attend a lecture by Matthew Arnold. This date is complicated by Jewett's hope for Butler's defeat.  Benjamin Butler ran for election twice in the 1880s, but not in 1883. See notes below.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.
    Fields has deleted the greeting in pencil.

discount:  See "Sarah Orne Jewett's Dog" (1889) for a portrait of Roger.  Roger and Browny/Brownie came to the Jewett household in 1881.  Both are mentioned only in the letter to Eben Norton Horsford of 27 October 1881 and in this letter.  Roger is mentioned more often in letters through possibly 1895.

Mr Arnold: This note complicates dating the letter. Jewett seems fairly clearly to be writing soon after an election in which Benjamin Butler was a candidate.  But here she seems to refer to British poet and critic, Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), whose first North American lecture tour began on 30 October 1883 and ended in March 1884.  Arnold spoke at Harvard on 11/12/1883 and several more times in the Boston area through mid-December.

Pin:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

Butler's defeat: Probably this is Benjamin Franklin Butler (1818-1893), a Massachusetts Democrat, who ran for President of the United States with the Greenback party.  Democrat Grover Cleveland won the election.  Prior to that, Butler won election as governor of Massachusetts in a 7 November 1882 vote.  As Jewett seems to be writing in 1883, perhaps there was some other issue involving perhaps someone else named Butler that she hoped would eventuate in defeat for him.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Lilian Woodman Aldrich

[ December 1883 ]*
Dearest Lilian

    Mrs. Vincent* accepts. We are much pleased, and shall be hoping to see you and Mr. Aldrich at Seven o'clock on Sunday evening.  Mrs. Fields* is writing to Mr. Booth* and hope that you will speak a friendly word too and make sure, [ if ?] from her* 

[ Page 2 ]

of our seeing him.  I think it will be a perfectly beautiful tea party!

Yours always lovingly

Sarah --    

148 Charles St --

Friday --

Notes

December 1883:  This tentative date is supported by knowing of another letter probably of 1883, SOJ to Carrie Jewett Eastman, in which Jewett reports having recently met Mrs. Vincent during a meal in the Annie Fields home at 148 Charles St., Boston.

Mrs. Vincent: Almost certainly this is Mary Ann Farlin Vincent (1818 - 1887), a British born Irish-American actor. She began her acting career in 1834, and so in 1883, she would have been on the stage for nearly 50 years.  She married James R. Vincent (d. 1850).  She joined the stock company of the Boston Museum theater in 1852, where she continued until her death.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mr. Booth: Edwin Booth (1833 - 1893) was a founding member of the New York Players Club in 1888.  Booth was an internationally famous American-born Shakespearean actor, a member of the circle of friends in which Jewett moved. His brother, John Wilkes Booth (1835-1865), assassinated President Abraham Lincoln.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Baily Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2657.



SOJ to Carrie Jewett Eastman

Cora's -- Monday night
[ December 1883 ]*

Dear Carrie

    I went to ask for the hollyhocks today but I could not find any, except some in water-color or oils.  I don't believe it is any use for you to wait for the people at the picture shops know pretty well what is 'going', and you see they wouldn't be so likely to copy such

[ Page 2 ]

big things in chromo --*  If I were you I should wait and do some from the real ones in [ summer ? ], for there are lots of other things you can get lovely patterns for.  I think it is splendid that you are getting on so nicely -- for I know you will enjoy it more and more --

    I was awfully disappointed today because O.P.* couldn't come.  I had made a

[ Page 3 ]

lot of little plans and I thought it would be so nice for her and for Mrs. Ellis and Mary Harriet* and Cora whom I was going to [ sprise ? ] with her -- I thought perhaps she might think about leaving Mother but I didn't know but you [could corrected ] go down visiting just for a night ^or two^ to "keep company."  Mrs. Fields* seemed to set her heart on it too! and we were quite dismal when the telegram came

[ Page 4 ]

for we had grown sure by that time that she must be coming --

    However, perhaps we can manage it some-other time -- and sister will now try to resign herself only I still have a little hope that she may come tomorrow.

    I have had a nice day today but a pretty busy one.  I had to go to Houghton's this morning for a while.  I am planning some things

[ Page 5 ]

for Mr. Aldrich, and I first went to the picture stores and then to see Miss Ticknor a little while and then I stopped to look at the Duchess* -- She hasn't a very good send-off for her New York visit for she lost her watch to-day a lovely repeater* that she was much attached to -- wasn't it too bad.  Tomorrow Cora has asked me to go [ two deleted words ] to see the Colleen Bawn.  I

[ Page 6 ]

have great hopes that I shall have privileges of the Shaughnasee{.}  Sister dont feel as if it would be right* to spend any more money "on" it herself!

     To-day dear little old Mrs. Vincent* came to lunch with us and was perfectly charming.  You know she has played for nearly fifty years.  She and "Warren."  Everybody loves her and when it is fifty years they are going to give her a grand blow out benefit -- She is a funny precise little old Englishwoman, as brisk as a bee --  I have always hoped to meet her sometime.  She got telling us stories about one

[ Up the left margin and then down the top margin of page 1 ]

thing and another and we sat forever over the lunch table and then sat before the fire up in the library.  Cora sends love and so do I.  I must close in haste with love to all -- from

The Queen*


Notes

December 1883:  This date is inferred from Jewett's reference to her plan to see The Colleen Bawn.  See notes below.

chromo:  A color print made using chromolithography.

O.P.:  A family nickname for Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Ellis and Mary Harriet and Cora: Emma Harding Claflin Ellis and Cora Clark Rice. It seems likely that Jewett also refers to Mary Harriet Denny, sister of Augusta Maria Denny Tyler.  See Correspondents.

Houghton's:  Jewett's publisher, Houghton Mifflin & Co.

Mr. Aldrich: Thomas Bailey Aldrich.  In 1883, Aldrich was editor of Atlantic Monthly, published by Houghton Mifflin. See Correspondents.

Miss Ticknor: Richard Cary identifies Anna Eliot Ticknor (1823-1896). The eldest daughter of the American historian George Ticknor, she consorted with Jewett in Boston and in the Northeast Harbor-Mt. Desert region on the Maine coast. Miss Ticknor was one of the editors of Life, Letters, and Journals of George Ticknor (Boston, 1876), and sole editor of Life of Joseph Green Cogswell (Cambridge, Mass., 1874).

Duchess:  While this is not certain, it is likely Jewett refers to Lilian Aldrich, wife of Thomas Bailey Aldrich.  In their close circle of friends, the couple was called the Duke and Duchess of Ponkapog, after their home near Beverly, MA.

Colleen Bawn ... Shaughraun: The Colleen Bawn, or The Brides of Garryowen is a melodramatic play by Irish playwright Dion Boucicault (c. 1820 - 1890), first performed at Laura Keene's Theatre, New York, on 27 March 1860.   The play was performed frequently in Boston from 1876 through 1883 by the stock company of the Museum Theater, where Mary Ann Farlin Vincent was an actor.  It seems likely that Jewett refers to performances in December of 1883.  Boucicault performed in this production.
   Though the transcription is uncertain, it is the case that The Shaughraun (1874) also is a play by Boucicault.  However, Jewett's reference to privileges remains obscure.

right:  This word is underlined twice in the manuscript.

Mrs. Vincent ... "Warren":  Almost certainly this is Mary Ann Farlin Vincent (1818 - 1887), a British born Irish-American actor. She began her acting career in 1834, and so in 1883, she would have been on the stage for nearly 50 years.  She married James R. Vincent (d. 1850).  She joined the stock company of the Boston Museum theater in 1852, where she continued until her death.  Also a member of the Boston Museum acting company was William Warren (1812-1888).

The Queen:  A family nickname for Jewett was "The Queen of Sheba."  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett to Caroline Augusta Jewett Eastman, Jewett Family Papers: MS014.01.01.04.  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller. Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Tuesday evening

[ 25 December 1883 ]

My dear T.L.*

    I am glad you liked the letters for I am so fond of them. Nothing that ever happens afterward could take away the happy memory of these first months -- that year at least when I had so much real pleasure with Miss Preston.* I have always told you that, I think, and I felt it [ more corrected ] than ever the other day when I found the package of her letters -- When I am reading them I am ready

[ Page 2 ]

to say it was I who ought to have been blamed -------

    She used to be so charmingly kind and sympathetic and was always making little plans for us. I have always had a lingering hope that I should be with her some where, sometime or other and we should be friends again, and I would make her tell me what the matter was. [ 3 and a half deleted lines ]  (( I'm not to be silly! ))*

[ Page 3 ]

    -- Darling -- you are not to be worried about me for I shall get on very well, and I really feel much better tonight. I have begun to take heart about the stories too which have seemed very despairing. Pin* to be a good girl now, for never saw anybody so good as T.L. is! It is all on account of the swan quill pen! Pin to borrow the pen for a day or two? (Pin! dont you dare!) Pin is been reading Froude's Essay on Calvinism* -- she readed a page and half and then

[ Page 4 ]

she was moved to think about a story to be called The Harbour Farm.* Doesn't that sound well? Tomorrow, oh please Pin dont [ deleted letters ] have anything the matter with you -- and write that nice new story -- and see if it wont be a good one -- The New Parishioner* was ever so many pages long, nearly a hundred [ in extra small script but he was so stupid that Pin is ] [ in extra large script going to throw him away! ] [ in extra small script He was a bad man but he needn't have been so stupid.]  Miss Lydia Dunn is very good in the story -- Perhaps I will bring the story and we will read it -- [ but corrected or deleted? ] think we can do something with it --

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 1 ]

Good night my darling my darling. I wish I could get hold of you, but Pin to be very good. I went out for a little while and gave away some of my presents and peoples were so pleased. Pin had a beautiful time with her neighbours. Pin to feel even better tomorrow and T.L. not think about her except to love her -- Always your Pinny --



Notes

25 December 1883:  This date has been penciled in the upper right of page 1.  This seems likely to be correct.  Christmas fell on Tuesday in 1883.  However, it is not impossible that the letter was composed the week previous to Christmas.

T. L.:   Nickname for Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

Miss Preston:  Harriet Waters Preston. See Correspondents. Paula Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett, indicates that the cause of the break between Jewett and her early mentor remains unknown, and that the relationship never was mended (p. 108-9).

silly!)):  The inside parentheses appear to be Jewett's; the outer marks are in pencil and probably in another hand.

Pin:  Pinny Lawson (Pin), one of Jewett's nicknames.

Froude's Essay on Calvinism: "Calvinism: An Address Delivered at St. Andrew’s" (1871) by English historian and biographer of Thomas Carlyle, James Anthony Froude (1818-1894).

The Harbour Farm: Jewett is not known to have published a story of this title, and it is not obvious that any of her published stories from 1883 or 1884 might easily have taken this title.  Perhaps she was beginning to think of her 1885 novel, A Marsh Island.

Parishioner:  Jewett's "A New Parishioner" appeared in Atlantic Monthly (51:475-493) in April 1883.  Lydia Dunn is the protagonist.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Greenleaf Whittier

Saturday morning
Dec. 29, [1883]*

My dear Friend

    It seems so long since I wrote you that I dont like to count up the time.  I hope you received the Mate of Daylight,* who made one of his very first voyages in covers to the port of Danvers?*  I believe he is going very well so far, but I am mindful of your good advice about writing a long story though far be it from me to give any hint of such a thing to the world outside me.

    I have been here a fortnight now, though I was away in Exeter last week keeping my Grandfather’s birthday.  He was in high spirits and might have been a hundred instead of ninety-five,* for the noble pride he took in his age.  He appeared in a new suit of clothes and we all teased him for being a dandy and made ourselves particularly merry at his expense, and he gave us some of his best Burgandy [ so spelled ] and an excellent dinner, and altogether it was a fine occasion.  He has made up his mind to be a hundred, and he is not to be beaten by even time.  I believe, if one can judge anything from the success of past resolutions.

    I was greatly disappointed when I found that you were not coming to town.  Some how I took it for granted that this winter would be like last, and I should see you often.  I missed you so much the other day when I went to the Winthrop House to see the Sandpiper.*

    Dear A. F.* is pretty well and you don’t know how often we talk about you, and wish for you.  She sends her love and so do I.

                    Yours always affectionately

                        S. O. J.

Tell Phebe Roger* is back in town being much admired and enjoying himself immensely


Notes

1883:  The transcriber speculatively dates this letter in 1884, but Jewett seems to refer to her book, The Mate of the Daylight, as just appearing.  The book appeared at the end of 1883.  Her grandfather Perry's 95th birthday also fell in 1883.

Danvers:  Whittier's home in Danvers, MA, was not on the coast. Richard Cary says: "In 1875 Whittier's cousins, the Misses Johnson and Abby J. Woodman, pur­chased a farm of sixty acres in Danvers and invited him to make his home there when­ever he wished. The place was notable for beautiful lawns, orchards, gardens, and grapevines. Whittier suggested the name of "Oak Knoll," which was immediately adopted."

Mate of the Daylight:  Jewett's story, "The Mate of the Daylight" first appeared in Atlantic 50 (July 1882) and was collected in The Mate of the Daylight and Friends Ashore at the end of 1883.  It seems more likely that Jewett has sent Whittier a copy of the book.

ninety-five: Jewett's grandfather, William Perry, celebrated his 95th birthday on 20 December 1883.

Winthrop House to see the Sandpiper:  In the Jewett-Fields circle, Sandpiper was the nickname for Celia Thaxter. See CorrespondentsThe Celia Thaxter Timeline by Norma H. Mandel says that in 1882, Thaxter began staying regularly at the Winthrop Hotel, "a small, inexpensive, quiet hotel on Bowdoin Street in Boston."

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Phebe Roger: Richard Cary says: "Phebe Woodman Grantham was the adopted daughter of Whittier's cousin Abby J. Woodman. In her childhood she lived at Oak Knoll and was the object of much affection by Whittier, who wrote the poem "Red Riding Hood" for her.
    Roger is a Jewett family dog.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, folder 63, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Undated Letters Probably from 1883



SOJ to Lilian Woodman Aldrich


[ Begin letterhead ]

148. Charles Street.
                Boston.

[ End letterhead ]

[ 1883 ]*

Dear Lilian

    All Mr. Pierces* tickets had first class seats, and ^ [ unrecognized insertion wet! or yet! ? ] the Directors have sent a formal invitation beside --

    I will see about the list ^for Mr. Paine^* { -- }[  bless corrected ] your dear heart for thinking of it -- and I believe Mr. Paine was to ask the governor, so I dont

[ Page 2 ]

think we can very well interfere but I will ask Mr. Paine or have Mrs Fields* -- about the box.

    Mrs. Howells sent Mr. Howells* down this morning so that will answer her note.

Forgive this letter and still love you aff --

Sadie --*

Notes

1883:  This date in brackets appears in the upper right corner of page 1, penciled in another hand.  No rationale for this choice is given. In the absence of any other helpful information, I have chosen to accept this date.  Knowledge of a ticketed event in Boston involving the persons named could resolve this date problem.

Mr. Pierces:  Almost certainly this is Henry Lillie Pierce (1825-1896). See Correspondents.

Mr. Paine:  Though not certainly, this probably is Robert Treat Paine, Jr. (1835-1910), a Boston lawyer, philanthropist and social reformer, who among other positions was for a time president of the Associated Charities of Boston, with which Annie Adams Fields was connected.
    Without further information, identifying the invited governor also is problematic.  One of Jewett's friends was one-time Massachusetts Governor William Claflin (1818 - 1905).  In 1883, the current state governor was Benjamin Franklin Butler (1818 -1893).

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mrs Howells ... Mr Howells:  Elinor and William Dean Howells. See Correspondents.

Sadie: Sadie Martinot, after the American actress of that name, was a nickname for Jewett with the Aldriches. See Correspondents.
    On the other side of the fold on page 2 Jewett's signature seems to appear again: -- Sadie!  However, this transcription is uncertain.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Baily Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2704.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Wednesday night

[ 1883 ]*

Dear Fuff*

    I never knew [ any ] thing so beautiful! but [ of ] course the linnet* loves [it.  I ] knew he would; but for [ you ] I was more delighted than you were when I got your letter and his. The dear linnet [ how ] he must have been looking [ more ] and more inscrutably satisfied all the time he was reading it, and have begun the letter

[ Page 2 ]

'incidental' -- And if you had heard him go on about Theocritus* that evening when I did, you would have lost all hope of ever doing the like again -- Oh My dear little Fuff I am so glad about it. Didn't I always say you would have more lovely things to say! Not to be a keeping-still Fuff: but I know one thing - that Pintoe* bursted its dear self with pride -- it hoped you would excuse it, but it could not contain even one of Pin's feets when she was so proud.

[ breaks off; no signature ]

Notes

1883:  This date appears in pencil in the upper right of page 1.  The letter contains no confirming information.  If this date was added by Fields, then it would likely to be close.  Jewett and Fields began using the Fuff and Pinny Lawson nicknames after the summer of 1882.
    This manuscript has two pieces torn away from the right side.  Italics words in brackets are guesses about the content of the missing parts.

Fuff:  A Jewett nickname for Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

linnet:  The Linnet is a nickname close friends gave to then Atlantic editor, Thomas Bailey Aldrich. See Correspondents.

Theocritus: Theocritus (c. 308 - c. 240 BC), Greek originator of pastoral poetry.  Annie Fields's poem, "Theocritus" appeared in Under the Olive (1881). 
    If the date of the letter is correct, then Fields's "Theocritus" cannot be the poem that it appears Fields has just shown to Thomas Bailey Aldrich.  In June - December of 1883, Fields published three poems: "The Folding" appeared in Harper's Magazine (June) and "Chrysalides"(September) and "The Initiate" (December) appeared in Atlantic Monthly. If this letter is from late in 1883, then possibly her "Daisidaimonia" -- in Atlantic March 1884 -- is the right poem.

Pintoe:  Presumably a play upon Pinny Lawson (Pin), one of Jewett's nicknames. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

[ 1883 ]*

    I am so struck with [ unrecognized words ] passion of A Mary Robinson in the Bronte book {--} "uncertainty of close that marks most early work" {--} it has given me a great lesson: No words can say how I like that little book. I hoard it like a miser and hate to finish it altogether{.}


Notes

1883:  This fragment appears on the bottom half of a folded sheet. The text is penciled in green, and the handwriting is quite rough. These details may lead one to suspect that Fields has copied this passage from a Jewett letter, for while the style and ideas seem likely to be Jewett's, the handwriting may not be hers.
    Jewett refers to Agnes Mary Robinson's (1857-1944) biography, Emily Brontë (1883). The speculative date of this fragment is tentatively based upon the publication date of the book.
    Jewett has modified her quotation from Robinson; the original reads: "Had the poem ended here it would have been perfect, but it and many more of these lyrics have the uncertainty of close that usually marks early work" (p. 174).

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Edited by Terry Heller, Coe College.




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