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1890    1892

Sarah Orne Jewett Letters of 1891



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Monday morning

[ Early January 1891 ]*

My dear Fuff* --

    I had a great headache yesterday, and it wouldn't go off until I had gone to bed in despair but this morning I am only battered.  I considered it to be the damp snow but perhaps it goes such a neurology [ ! might ? ] have had other excuses than mere weather. But I shall keep in today.

    Oh I was so dreadfully pleased

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with Mr. Alden's* entirely proper note! I have a peculiar feeling about that poem as being one of your best and one of my dearest --     I do feel anxious about the Mrs. Dresser business* -- lest you haven't thought to tell Dr. Morton* for she is touchy* in her doctorly heart and most devoted in her private capacity as a friend and has done I honestly

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believe all a doctor could. You might as well try to mind cure yourself if you had burnt your hand at the library fire as to mind cure your pipes which are stung by the winter weather.

    What a mind cure can do* for you is to help you bear up under the pipes and you have been so worn and fretted by your illness that I hope and pray [ Mrs. corrected ] Dresser may soothe and help you in her way.  And when we are pulled

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down so far that we "cant be sensible ourselves" as the Twin* spoke of being pleasant! Why then somebody who can put us in the way of calmness and patience with our disorders is a great benefactor. If you wouldn't go away ^and be well^ the only thing was to say; now I have got to make myself as comfortable as I can here, but you wanted to stay* and be well, and are disappointed. If I could have begged you to go to Baltimore even and stay in the Mt. Vernon

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Hotel a fortnight! but I didn't think of that. One of hardest things in this hard winter has been that I couldn't do things for you, dear darling. Of course we would have skipped right off early last month -- and there would have been the end of your woes.

    Forgive my writing all this -- at any rate forgive anything that annoys you if I have said such a thing, for indeed I love you and only wish to show it ----

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    -- I dont know what it is in the Houghton book* so [ smirky ? ] and self-applauding and insistent & monotonous. Unless it is Mr. Wemys Reid the biographer! I cant think that Lord Houghton was so like that and yet beloved of Fitzgerald* and such men. But I feel in most their letters a second sort of friendship for him.  Fitzgerald doesn't write to him as to his best beloved nor do Carlyle or Tennyson.

    I wonder if you will disagree with me. But he ought to be in Westminster Abbey for having

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of p. 6 ]

saved Sydney Smiths & Carlyles fun at the end of the book.  Dearest Fuff I have every thing to say, but here is John for the mail.

Always your

-- Pinny*


Notes

Early January 1891:  This date is based upon Jewett indicating that she has begun reading Reid's biography of Richard Monckton Milnes, published in 1891.  Fields dates a slightly later letter discussing this biography to January of 1891.  Unless the biography was available before 1891, perhaps for the 1890 holiday season, Fields's date may be somewhat early. But it should be close.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mr. Alden: Henry Mills Alden, editor at Harper's Magazine. See Correspondents. Presumably, he has accepted work by Fields.  During 1891, two Fields poems appeared in Harper's: "Silence and Solitude" in April and "The Singing Shepherd" in December.

Mrs. Dresser business:  Probably, Fields has announced a plan to consult Annetta G. Seabury Dresser (1843-1935), wife of Julius Alphonso Dresser (1838-1893). She and her husband were practitioners of the "Quimby System of Mental Treatment of Diseases," a rival and possible precursor of Christian Science.

Dr. Morton: Dr. Helen Morton (1834-1916) had offices successively on Marlboro, Boylston, and Chestnut streets in Boston. Richard Cary says that Jewett once characterized her as "touchy in her doctorly heart and more devoted in her private capacity as a friend."

touchy:  Though Richard Cary also reads this word as "touchy," it is difficult to be certain about this; it might easily read "lonely" or "lovely."  Jewett seems to have crossed the first letter, and I have let that decide for me.

can do:  "Can" is underlined twice.

Twin:  This transcription is uncertain.  If Jewett has written "Twin," then she may refer to one of the sisters (who were not twins) whom she often called "the Twins," Helen Olcott Choate Bell and Miriam Foster Choate Pratt. See Correspondents.

to stay:  Jewett underlined these words three times.

Houghton book: Sir Thomas Wemyss Reid's (1842-1905) biography of Richard Monckton Milnes (1809-1885) is The Life, Letters, and Friendships of Richard Monckton Milnes, First Lord Houghton (1891).

Fitzgerald ... Carlyle ... Tennyson ... Sydney Smith: British poets Edward Fitzgerald (1809-1883) and Alfred Lord Tennyson.  Scottish author, Thomas Carlyle (1785-1881) and English author Sydney Smith (1771-1845).

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

[ January 1891 ]

well, dont you think so? )*

    I think better of the Lord Houghton book* as I see it more, just as you did! What an exquisite letter that is of Tennyson's when R.M.M was cross at him* and what a dear kind old pat on the shoulder our reverend Sydney Smith gave him when R.M.M. thought he had been called names of the cool of the evening &c &c !  And I do so like Carlyle's first long letter from Fryston to his wife -- (where speaks of Mrs.

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(Milnes the Elder* as high-sailing! = It has been such a lovely quiet snowy day -- just the kind I like to be hard at work in. I am getting to be a great looker out of the window and I see so many things that I should like to snap my camera at, only the light is always wrong. [an apparently stray mark appears in the margin to the right of this sentence. ]

    -- Another letter from S.W.* with printing inside and a feigned hand outside which you shall see when I come. )


Notes

January 1891:  This manuscript is a 2-page fragment; both the beginning and the ending of the letter are absent. It appears with other passages from Jewett letters that Fields dates to January 1891.  The reference to Reid's biography of Richard Monckton Milnes, published in 1891 indicates that this date should be close.

so?): This and all other parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled in by Fields.

Lord Houghton book: Sir Thomas Wemyss Reid's (1842-1905) biography of Richard Monckton Milnes (1809-1885) is The Life, Letters, and Friendships of Richard Monckton Milnes, First Lord Houghton (1891). The Tennyson letter is in v. 1, pp. 179-80. See v. 1, pp. 213-215 for the Smith letter. The Fryston estate was Milnes's home. Carlyle's long letter to his wife is in v. 1, pp. 255-58.

S.W.:  Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields Transcription

In Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 83, Fields includes a passage from this letter.

     I think better of the Lord Houghton book, as I see it more, just as you did. What an exquisite letter that is of Tennyson's, when R. M. M. was cross at him, and what a dear kind old pat on the shoulder our reverend Sydney Smith gave him, when R. M. M. thought he had been called names of the "cool of the evening," etc., etc. And I do so like Carlyle's first long letter, from Fryston to his wife.



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

January 6, 1891.

      A message of the New Year with its trembling hopes, its intimations, its retrospect. The year always comes as a person to me; and this one has a gentle look and perhaps will lay a soft hand on us. At all events one can live and love in it, and so one turns to and rallies on one's abstract propositions.

Notes

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109. 



SOJ to Louise Chandler Moulton


South Berwick Maine*
6 January 1891

Dear Mrs Moulton

    I thank you sincerely for your kind words; it gives me great pleasure to think that you like the stories of my Strangers and Wayfarers,* and "have made no strangers of them" as we say in the country!

    I hope that you have come

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back from your pleasant summer, feeling quite well and strong.  You see that I feel quite sure of it having been pleasant!

    I send you most cordial good wishes for the New Year{.} That's my best thanks for your note, and beg you to believe me

Yours most truly

Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

Maine:  There are several numbers in the lower left corner of page 1, apparently identification marks for Library of Congress.  With this letter in the LOC folder is a matching envelope, addressed to 28 Rutland Square, Boston, and cancelled 6 January 1891.

Strangers and Wayfarers:  Jewett's story collection of this title appeared in 1890.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Library of Congress in the Louise Chandler Moulton papers, 1852-1908.  MSS33787.  This transcription of from a microfilm copy of the manuscript, on Reel 8 of Microfilm 18,869-15N-15P.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to
Mrs. George D. Howe

     South Berwick, Maine

     January 9, 1891

     My dear Alice:

      You were very good to remember me in sending such a pleasant invitation, but I am afraid I shall not be in town for a long time yet as my mother has been very ill again and I am staying at home almost constantly this winter.

     Everybody is most delighted at the news of the Fogg Library.1 You may be sure that nobody is more pleased than I am.

     With my best thanks for the invitation, believe me ever

     Yours sincerely,

     Sarah O. Jewett

Notes
     1 A tablet in the Fogg Memorial Library, a wing of Berwick Academy, states: "This building was erected AD 1894 in memory of William Hayes Fogg. Born in Berwick, Maine, Dec. 27, 1817. Died in New York City, March 29, 1884." Although Miss Jewett refers to him as "a former pupil" in "The Old Town of Berwick," New England Magazine, n.s.x (July 1894), 604, he is not listed as such in A Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Berwick Academy (July 1, 1891). Fogg left Berwick as a young man and accumulated a fortune in the China and Japan trade. A large legacy left to the school by his widow was announced at this time. Miss Jewett concerned herself with the planning and construction of the building, and Sarah Wyman Whitman designed the stained glass windows and directed the interior decoration.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Saturday afternoon, 17 January, 1891.

     This is a short word for you to read on Monday morning, written at the close of a dark and stormy afternoon. I have been sitting in mother's room, reading your big Rumford book,* which I somehow have taken into my head again. He was such a charioteer! What do you think that he did once but have every beggar in Munich arrested! and then sorted them out after careful examination, giving work to those who needed it, and helping all deserving, and dealing with the naughty ones. There was a huge work-house, for instance, where they were put at trades. You would be much pleased with the accounts, and some time we must talk about it. I have felt a little tired and clumsy-handed, and the Rumford book was just the thing. The count was really such an interesting man. Oh, if this young republic could have had his practical wisdom!

Notes

your big Rumford book: Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford (1753-1814). According to the Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia, the American born scientist left the colonies in 1776, because he opposed the American rebellion, and was knighted for service to England in 1784. He then "became aide-de-camp to the elector of Bavaria. During his 11 years in Bavaria, Thompson reorganized the Bavarian army, abolished mendicancy in Munich, and established workhouses for the poor. In 1791 the elector made Thompson a count of the Holy Roman Empire." The "big" Rumford book is very likely, George E. Ellis (1814-1894), Memoir of Sir Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford (1871).

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Field

Monday night

19 January [ 1891 ]*

Dear Fuff*

     I now humbly apologize for presuming to suggest Wanda* but I thought it would amuse you and waste a day or two's time -- just as its it has done! It grows dull at the last but it is nice and picturesque at the beginning. I don't believe that you are any the worse for it -- you aren't quite equal to hard reading and you must be doing something

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on account of your grand-mother's having been a May.* I hope after this humility to be reinstated in your respect and affection. Novels are good as they go along -- it is only when they stop that you take it in that the pretty bubble is made of a spatter of soap suds! (Please to remember this nice simile!) (* I had a delightful letter tonight from Helen Merriman.* I must bring it and read it when I come -- and this reminds me to say -- it is chiefly about S.W.'s* little portrait -- that

[ Manuscript breaks off.  No signature ]

Notes

1891:  Fields has added and then deleted "1892" in the upper right, in blue pencil. However, Jewett mentions a portrait that Sarah Wyman Whitman is working on for Helen Bigelow Merriman (see notes below), a portrait Jewett appears to mention again in a letter to Fields almost certainly composed 30 June 1891.  In 1891, January 19 fell on Monday.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents. Fields has deleted this greeting using black pencil.

"Wanda": Wanda, Countess von Szalras (1883) is by British novelist, Ouida (pseud, of Louise de la Ramée (1839-1908).

a May: One of Annie Fields' grandmothers was a member of the old abolitionist and reforming May family. See Blanchard, p. 126.

(:  This parenthesis mark was inserted by Fields in blue pencil.

Helen Merriman: See Correspondents.

S.W.'s little portrait:  Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields Transcription

Fields includes a paragraph from this letter in Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), pp. 165-6.  The manuscript of the second paragraph here has not yet been located.

    I now humbly apologize for presuming to suggest "Wanda," but I thought it would amuse you and waste a day or two's time just as it has done! It grows dull at the last, but it is nice and picturesque at the beginning. I don't believe that you are any the worse for it -- you aren't quite equal to hard reading and you must be doing something on account of your grand-mother's having been a May. I hope after this humility to be reinstated in your respect and affection. Novels are good as they go along. It is only when they stop that you take it in that the pretty bubble is made of a spatter of soap suds! (Please to remember this nice simile!)
     As you say, what a delightful thing it is to have the mood for books on one and the chance to give up everything for it, but with me it doesn't last many days, that enchanting and desperate state of devouring cover and all.



     SOJ to Frederic Allison Tupper

    South Berwick, Maine
 
     January 20, 1891

     My dear Sir:

      I am sorry to be so late in thanking you for your kindness in sending me your book, Echoes from Dream-Land.1 It was unfortunately mislaid for some time and has only appeared on my desk again today. I am sure that the writing of these pages must have given you much pleasure and I wish to thank you for the pleasure which the verses called "The Poet's Boyhood"2 have given me. I believe that I care more for them than any of the others which I had time to read yet.

     With best acknowledgments of your kind attention, believe me

     Yours sincerely,

     Sarah O. Jewett

Notes
 
     1 A volume of some eighty-five poems, among them several class odes and baccalaureate hymns, but predominantly nature lyrics in simple Wordsworthian strain; published in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, in 1890.
     2 A seventeen-quatrain reminiscence of his immersion in nature and emergence as a poet of its moods, unfolded in a series of familiar bucolic images and one Aeschylean epithet.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Wednesday night
[ 21 January 1891 ]

Dearest Fuff*

    (I begin to feel as if I shouldn't get to you this week after all. I shall try to come early next week -- but dont you think it is wiser to wait until I can stay two nights? (I am very much disappointed, but now that Mary* isn't well I cant be spared by night.) She is feeling better this evening but I was afraid as I told you, that she was going to have the other kind of "The La Grippe.") It is all true that you say about Wanda*

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but I did like her very much and only set down certain silly things as merely the fault of the writer! as if Wanda had been unlucky in her biographer. And all the landscape was charming to me about the old castle -- and that fine wild bit about her town been* flooded and her rushing to its rescue.

    To* descend to sublunary themes will you please let Mr W. J. Williams* pay this little bill?

    And what did Judy* say about the funeral last Saturday or couldn't she go by reason of

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the storm? Dont write the answer! it is a talky thing.))

    This morning I was out, taking a sober drive about town with John* soberly driving, and I saw [ deleted word ] such a coast from way up the the long hillside down to the tavern garden.  And directly afterward ^down in the valley^ I beheld Stubby* faring along with his sled which is about as large as a postage stamp. I borryed* it, as you say, and was driven up to the top of the hill street and down I slid over that

[ Page 4 ]

pound cake frosting of a coast most splendid, and meekly went back to the village and returned the sled. Then an hour later in bursts Stubby with shining morning face: "There were two fellows that said Aunt Sarah was the boss. She went down side-saddle over the hill just like the rest of the boys !!!!"  Stubby seemed to think that we had entered upon a new chapter of friendship. He hadn't an s to his back ath he converthed upon the great thubjeck but I confess that it was a very good coast and I wished that I had time for more -- (It makes

[ Up the left margin of page 1 ]

me quite wishful about Alice* to think of all the coasting privileges and deep snow going to waste.)

[ No signature ]


Notes

21 January 1891 : Fields penciled "Winter" and "1895?" in the upper right of page 1. However, this letter seems fairly clearly to continue a discussion of the novel Wanda in a letter to Fields that seems to have been composed on Monday 19 January 1891.
     Parenthesis marks in this letter have been penciled in by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Wanda: Wanda, Countess von Szalras (1883) is by Ouida (pseud, of Louise de la Ramée, 1839-1908).

been: Fields appears to have changed this to "being" in pencil.

To:  Fields appears to have marked this paragraph with an angled line in green pencil.

Mr W. J. Williams: This person has not been identified.  There were several people of this name in the Boston area in 1890.

Judy:  Probably this is Judith Drew Beal, stepdaughter of Annie Fields's sister, Louisa Adams Beal -- who also was nicknamed Judy.  See Annie Fields in Correspondents.

thing.)):  Fields has penciled both parenthesis marks, the first in green.

John: John Tucker. See Correspondents.

such:  Jewett has underlined this word twice.

Stubby:  Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

borryed: Jewett has underlined this word twice.

(It:  Parentheses around this passage are by Fields in green pencil.

Alice: Which of the Alices among the Jewett and Fields acquaintances Jewett speaks of here is not clear.  Often, she would mean Alice Greenwood Howe. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields Transcription

Fields includes a passage from this letter in Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 51.  She dates her composite letter Thursday night, 4 December, 1889.

     This morning I was out, taking a drive about town with John and I saw such a coast from way up the long hillside down to the tavern garden, and directly afterward down in the village I beheld Stubby faring along with his sled, which is about as large as a postage-stamp. So I borryed it, as you say, and was driven up to the top of the hill street and down I slid over that pound-cake frosting of a coast most splendid, and meekly went back to the village and returned the sled. Then an hour later in bursts Stubby, with shining morning face: "There were two fellows that said Aunt Sarah was the boss, she went down side-saddle over the hill just like the rest of the boys!"



     SOJ to Dana Estes

     South Berwick, Maine

     January 22, 1891

     My dear Mr. Estes:

      Will you give my best thanks to your committee and say that I regret very much that I cannot accept their polite invitation to the Dinner of the Pine Tree State Club1 on the twenty-eighth of January. Nobody at the feast will be more proud and fond of his native state than I am of what Whittier has called our "hundred-harbored Maine."2
     Believe me ever

     Yours sincerely,
     Sarah Orne Jewett

Notes

     1 An organization of native Maine men living in and around Boston which convened periodically for intellectual and social fellowship.
     2 Miss Jewett's long friendship with Whittier came about through his association with publisher James T. Fields. Whittier looked forward to his meetings with Miss Jewett and Mrs. Fields in Boston, Amesbury, and South Berwick, and maintained correspondence with them even when they went abroad. His letter to Miss Jewett on Deephaven vies in ardor with Emerson's to Whitman on Leaves of Grass. In 1888 Miss Jewett dedicated The King of Folly Island "with grateful affection" to the gentle Friend.
     Whittier wrote the sonnet "Godspeed" for "my friends Annie Fields and Sarah Orne Jewett" on the occasion of their first departure for Europe in 1882. Not to be outdone, Miss Jewett eulogized him in "The Eagle Trees," Harper's, LXVI (March 1883), 608
     The allusion to Maine is from Whittier's "The Dead Ship of Harpswell":

      From gray sea-fog, from icy drift,
     From peril and from pain,
     The home-bound fisher greets thy lights,
     O hundred-harbored Maine!

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



     SOJ to Dana Estes

       South Berwick, Maine

     January 22, [1891]

     Dear Mr. Estes:

     After writing my note of this morning I have remembered that Mrs. Richards of Gardiner1 is probably in town at 241 Beacon Street, and that you will undoubtedly like to have her asked to your dinner. I am very sorry that I was compelled to decline, but I am kept here this winter by the serious illness of a member of our family,2 and it is impossible for me to count upon going to town even for a day. If all the Maine-born people are as proud of Mrs. Richards -- the child of Maine's adoption -- as I am, then they are very proud indeed! I hope that I am right in thinking that she is available for your dinner company on the 28th, but you are likely to know, since she is of your publishing household.3
 
     Believe me, with best regards,

     Yours sincerely,

     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes
 
    1 Laura Elizabeth Richards (1850-1943), daughter of Julia Ward Howe, was a prolific poet, biographer, and novelist, best remembered for her two series of juvenile stories, the Toto and the Hildegarde books. Mrs. Richards came to Gardiner, Maine, in 1876 with her husband and resided there until her death.
    2 During this period Miss Jewett makes repeated reference to the fatal illness of her mother, Caroline Frances Perry Jewett, who died on October 21, 1891.
    3 Estes had already published eight of Mrs. Richards' books, one of which was her most durable novel, Captain January. No less than forty-four others appeared under the imprints of Estes & Lauriat and D. Estes & Company in the next twenty-two years.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Kate Knowlton Foote


South Berwick Maine
23rd of January
[ 1891 ]*

My dear Mrs Foote

    I thank you very much for two charming cards of invitation to which I have been sorry not to respond, but I am kept at home this winter by my mother's illness and it is impossible to count upon getting to town,

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even for a day or two.

    With my best thanks for your kind remembrance and my regards to Mr Foote.

Pray believe me ever

Yours sincerely

Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

1891:  Jewett's mother, Caroline Frances Perry, died on 21 October 1891. She reports in other letters of January 1891 that she is remaining at home to care for her mother.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

January 31, 1891.

      I am led to wonder if time given to acquaintances and enemies is really worth as much towards one's everlasting salvation as if friends were allowed to come into the scheme of organization a little more freely.


Notes

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109. 



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

          Saturday morning, [January 1891]*


     I was busy writing most of the day yesterday, but went up the street for an hour to the funeral of a little grand-child of one of our neighbours. The mother had died of consumption not long ago, and this delicate little thing was brought to the old grandmother to take care of. So it was a blessed flitting, and a solemn little pageant of all the middle-aged and elderly neighbours going to the funeral and sitting in the room where the small coffin was, and that old, wise, little dead face, which made one feel one's self the ignorant child, and that poor baby an ancient wise creature that knew all that there was for a baby to know, of this world and the next.

Notes

January 1891:  Fields gives this material a positive date: 12 October, 1890. However, the pieces she combined with this paragraph came mainly from 1884 and 1891.  The manuscript for this paragraph has not yet been located, so it remains here in 1891.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields



[ Late January 1891 ]*

[ A fragment with missing material at the beginning ]

[ We ] drove four or five miles up into the country yesterday and took some photographs of the fields and old [ showy or snowy ? blotted ] houses and lanes. It was a lovely afternoon and I* did me good.

    The February Harper is full of good things -- I wish you would get it at once right out of the cheque ! ! ! as a last years Christmas present from me.  There is a quaint archaic touch in little Guineys poem to Izaak Walton,* and I do so like Craddock* who takes time and is lost to sight, to memory

[ Page 2 ]

dear and writes a good big Harpers story. So does "Sister" with one for the Atlantic called Felicia; so does not S. O. J.* whose French ancestry comes to the fore and makes her nibble all round her stories like a mouse. They used to be as long as yardsticks, they are now as long as spools and they will soon be the size of old fashioned peppermints: and have neither beginning or end, but shape and flavor may still be left them, and

[ Page 3 ]

a kind public may still accept [ when corrected from them ? ] there is nothing else. One began to write itself this morning called The Failure of Mr. David Berry -- which almost made me cry when I thought of it, but I have written a quarter and [ deleted words ] it goes very well indeed and seems to have its cheerful points:*

    What a long letter! but what years of talk we should have had that Sunday! Dear dear Fuff* keep on getting well -- and [ deleted words don't let ? ] we wont let anything spoil our courage and hope.

[ Page 4 ]

(Yours with dear love    Pinny*

I do not tell you about poor mother because one day is much like the day before -- [ continuing of ? ] something that can be eaten and making sure of enough sleep and all those things.  It is a wonder how cheerful she keeps and uncomplaining though she worries about things sometimes in a path piteous way -- and when we find it out and assure her she forgets them again -- She is on the sofa now, and likes the change from the bed -- Good bye again dear from P.L. who loves you. )


Notes

Late January 1891
:  Fields gives this letter a positive date: 12 October, 1890. However, given the notes below, this seems unlikely.  Jewett could not have read a publication of Guiney's poem until the appearance of the February 1891 issue of Harper's Monthly.
    Fields has penciled an insertion at the beginning of this text: "We".
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

I:  In pencil, Fields has deleted "I" and inserted "it".

Louise Guiney's poem to Izaak Walton,... Craddock ... so does Sister, with one for the "Atlantic" called Felicia: Louise Imogen Guiney's (1861-1920) "For Izaak Walton" appears in Harper's New Monthly Magazine 82 Issue 489 (February, 1891) p. 441.  The poem was collected in: Happy Ending: The Collected Lyrics of Louise Imogen Guiney, New Edition (1907). A text appears below.
     Isaak Walton (1593-1683) was the British author of The Compleat Angler, or the Contemplative Man's Recreation (1653). After he retired from business, he lived in Winchester.

Craddock:  Charles Egbert Craddock is the nom de plume of Mary Noailles Murfree (1850-1922).  Also in the February 1891 Harper's was her "In The 'Stranger People's' Country," pp. 359-384.  She is remembered for In the Tennessee Mountains (1884).

"Sister":   M. N. Murfree sister, Fanny Noailles Dickenson Murfree (1846-1941) was the author of Felicia (1891), a novel that began in July 1890 in The Atlantic.

For Izaak Walton  by Louise Imogen Guiney

Can trout allure the rod of yore
In Itchen stream to dip?
Or lover of her banks restore
That sweet Socratic lip?
Old fishing and wishing
Are over many a year.
Oh, hush thee, Oh, hush thee! heart
              innocent and dear.

Again the foamy shallows fill,
The quiet clouds amass,
And soft as bees by Catherine Hill
At dawn the anglers pass,
And follow the hollow,
In boughs to disappear.
Oh, hush thee, Oh, hush thee! heart
              innocent and dear.

Nay, rise not now, nor with them take
One amber-freckled fool!
Thy sons to-day bring each an ache
For ancient arts to cool.
But, father, lie rather
Unhurt and idle near;
Oh, hush thee, Oh, hush thee! heart
             innocent and dear.

While thought of thee to men is yet
A sylvan playfellow,
Ne'er by thy marble they forget
In pious cheer to go.
As air falls, the prayer falls
O'er kingly Winchester:
Oh, hush thee, Oh, hush thee! heart
             innocent and dear.
 

so does not S. O. J:    Pieces of hers do appear early in the year, such as her two-part holiday story in Ladies' Home Journal: "Mrs. Parkinson's Christmas Eve."  But she does not publish in Atlantic until May, with "A Native of Winby."

"The Failure of Mr. David Berry"Jewett's story appeared in Harper's in June 1891.  Jewett's end punctuation is ambiguous. I have rendered a colon as it appears, but perhaps she intended an exclamation point.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin / P.L. ) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields transcription
This appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 81.

     There is a quaint archaic touch in Louise Guiney's poem to Izaak Walton, and I do so like Craddock, -- # who takes time, and is lost to sight, to memory dear, and writes a good big Harper's story. So does Sister,# with one for the "Atlantic" called Felicia; so does not S. O. J., whose French ancestry comes to the fore, and makes her nibble all round her stories like a mouse. They used to be as long as yardsticks, they are now as long as spools, and they will soon be the size of old-fashioned peppermints, and have neither beginning or end, but shape and flavor may still be left them, and a kind public may still accept when there is nothing else. One began to write itself this morning called "The Failure of Mr. David Berry"; I have written a quarter, and it goes very well indeed, and seems to have its cheerful points.


Fields's notes

# Charles Egbert Craddock is the nom de plume of Miss Mary N. Murfree.

# Miss Murfree's sister.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Thursday morning

29 January 1891


My dearest Fuff -- *

    I have been suffering great pangs of conscience because I have spoken with you about going out, and never took it into account whether the Doctor had said you might! I took it for granted that there had been talk of a [ lark ? ], and that you were only waiting for the weather to be right. One practitioner ought to be very careful about interfering with another.

    Now I will tell you about my day yesterday which consisted of the duties of a nurse at intervals and two or three hours of writing and at three o'clock

[ Page 2 ]

going down with John* to get Mary's* new horse home -- she having been clipped -- and we drove Sheila* over and I led her home by her halter at the back of the sleigh and she was great fun.  It was a good mild day for a drive and I like so much better going off in that way about a little business -- Sheila is always so knowing and funny -- and noses me all [ over corrected ] after her sugar when I get home with her.  A couple of lumps seem so disproportioned in size to

[ Page 3 ]

being the pleasure they are to her thousand pounds of weight --

    Here it is snowing again! but it seems like a good day to me because I wish to get a good lot of writing done. Mother slept well last night and has waked up bright this morning.

    X* I read Madame Bovary* this ^all^ last evening though I only took it up for a few minutes and meant to do some writing afterward. It is quite wonderful how great a book he makes of it. People talk about dwelling upon trivialities

[ Page 4 ]

and commonplaces in life, but a master-writer gives everything weight and makes you feel the distinction and importance of it and count it upon the right or the wrong side of a life's account. That is one reason why writing about simple country people takes my time and thought. ----- But I should make too long a letter for this short morning. Flaubert who sees so far into the shadows of life may "dwell" and analyze and reflect as much as he pleases with the trivial things of life -- the woes of Hamlet* absorb our thoughts no more than the silly wavering gait of this Madame Bovary who

[ Page 5 ]

is uninteresting -- ill-bred, and without the attraction of rural surroundings. But the very great pathos of the book to me, is not the sins of her but the thought all the time if she could have had a little brightness and prettiness of taste in the dull doctor -- if she could have taken what there was in that dull little village! -- She is such a lesson to dwellers in country towns who drift out of relation to their surroundings not only social, but the very companionships of nature, unknown to them. (* I hope you are not

[ Page 6 ]

having too much trouble with the road paper!* If I were there I believe that I would go to Manchester and get it signed!  I believe that Mr. Meldram* would sign it -- wasn't he my friend of last year's selectmen with whom I came up to town? He has business in town and Mr Grew* would know about him and William could go-- and find him.

    But good bye dear -- I will send the Fortnightly in a day or two but I wish to read the rest of the Bulgarian paper* first -- I do not think that you were in a hurry were you? I find that it is the Nineteenth Century that you want! but I will try and send it tomorrow.

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 6 ]

With dear love to you darling Fuff -- your affectionate friend

Pinny*

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 1 ]

I think Alice's letters sound cheerful and wise -- dont you? and what a dear refined little [ "fist" ? ] Dicky* writes!


Notes

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

John: John Tucker. See Correspondents.

Mary's:  Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Sheila: Jewett's first horse, purchased in 1877.

X:  Fields has penciled the X here, to mark the spot at which she began her selection.

Madame Bovary ... Flaubert: French author, Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) published his novel, Madame Bovary, in 1857.

Hamlet:  In William Shakespeare's play of that name, Hamlet speaks in his most famous soliloquy about taking arms against "a sea of troubles" (Act III, Scene I).

them (:  This parenthesis mark was penciled in green by Fields.

road paper:  Presumably this refers to the road issue Jewett mentions in her letter to Fields of 12 October 1890.

Mr. Meldram:  Though this transcription is uncertain, it seems like Jewett refers to Nathan Preston Meldram (1837-1919), who was a selectman for the town of Manchester-by-the-Sea, MA in 1887-1889. He served the community in a number of other posts after that period.

Mr. Grew: Probably this is Henry Sturgis Grew (1834-1910). His wife was Jane Norton Wigglesworth (1836-1868).  A successful Boston businessman, Mr. Grew had homes in Boston, Hyde Park, and Manchester-by-the-Sea.  The Manchester home was the Sumacs, on Masconomo St.

William: Presumably a Fields employee, he has not yet been further identified.

Fortnightly ... Bulgarian paper: Jewett almost certainly was reading James D. Bourchier, "On the Black Sea with Prince Ferdinand" in The Fortnightly Review 49 New Series (1 January 1891), pp. 82 -  101.

Pinny:  Nickname for Jewett. See Correspondents.

Alice's ... Dicky:  Among the several "Alices" who were friends of Jewett and Fields, this probably is Alice Longfellow. See her and Richard Henry Dana III in Correspondents.  Dicky would be her nephew, Richard Henry Dana IV (1879-1933), son of her sister, Edith, who married Richard Henry Dana III.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields Transcription

In Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 81, Fields includes a passage from this letter.

     I read "Madame Bovary" all last evening, though I only took it up for a few moments and meant to do some writing afterward. It is quite wonderful how great a book Flaubert makes of it. People talk about dwelling upon trivialities and commonplaces in life, but a master writer gives everything weight, and makes you feel the distinction and importance of it, and count it upon the right or the wrong side of a life's account. That is one reason why writing about simple country people takes my time and thought. But I should make too long a letter for this short morning. Flaubert, who sees so far into the shadows of life, may "dwell" and analyze and reflect as much as he pleases with the trivial things of life; the woes of Hamlet absorb our thoughts no more than the silly wavering gait of this Madame Bovary, who is uninteresting, ill-bred, and without the attraction of rural surroundings. But the very great pathos of the book to me, is not the sin of her, but the thought, all the time, if she could have had a little brightness and prettiness of taste in the dull doctor, if she could have taken what there was in that dull little village! She is such a lesson to dwellers in country towns, who drift out of relation to their surroundings, not only social, but the very companionships of nature, unknown to them.



SOJ to Francis Hopkinson Smith*

South Berwick Maine,
1 February 1891

My dear friend    the Author of Colonel Carter of Cartersville!*

            I have wished to write you every time the first of the month has brought me The Century to thank you for the great pleasure I am taking in your most delightful story. Indeed I like it more and more as it goes on. I shall be so glad when I see you again, and can tell you many things that I believe about your rendering of such an enchanting hero, better than I can ^tell you^ here with pen and ink. Pray give my kindest remembrance to Mrs. Hopkinson Smith and believe me ever with best thanks and regards,

Yours sincerely,

Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

Colonel Carter of Cartersville:  Colonel Carter of Cartersville (1891) is a short humorous novel in which a Virginia gentleman, Colonel Carter, finds himself stranded in New York with no money.  Jewett read the story as a serial in Century Magazine November 1890 - April 1891.

The manuscript of this letter is held in the Autograph Collection at the Loyola University  (Chicago) Archives and Special Collections, item 1470, and may be viewed at Loyola University Chicago Digital Special Collections.  Original transcription by Sarah Morsheimer.  Slightly revised transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


William Dean Howells to SOJ

To Miss Sarah Orne Jewett
184 Commonwealth Avenue,
Feb'y 1, 1891.

DEAR MISS JEWETT:

     I had written about your book for some far forthcoming Study,* and when I took it up just now to read something over again in it, I thought I had thanked you for it. Thank you now and always.

     I opened and read The White Rose Road, which I had left because I always want to read Mr. Teaby and Going to Shrewsbury whenever I am in eyeshot of these. But "The W. R. R." is beautiful, and it made the tears come to my eyes out of the everlasting ache in my heart for all that is poor, and fair and pitiful.

     You have a precious gift, and you must know it, and can be none the worse for your knowledge. We all have a tender pleasure in your work, which there is no other name for but love. I think no one has shown finer art in a way, than you, and that something which is so much better than art, besides. Your voice is like a thrush's in the din of all the literary noises that stun us so.

     I hope your mother is better, and that we shall see you before long in Boston.

     Give my love to your nephew, and our united affection to all your house.

Yours sincerely,
W. D. HOWELLS.
 
Notes

some far forthcoming Study:  The stories named in the second paragraph appear in Strangers & Wayfarers (1890):  "The White Rose Road," "The Quest of Mr. Teaby," and "Going to Shrewsbury."  Howells wrote of these stories in his review of the collection in "The Editor's Study," the column he wrote as editor of Harper's New Monthly Magazine (1888-1892): 82:491 (April 1891) 804-805.

This letter comes from Life in Letters of William Dean Howells, edited by Mildred Howells. New York: Doubleday, 1928. v. 2, pp. 15-16, 41, 146, 391-2. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Louisa Loring Dresel to SOJ

328 Beacon St.
Feb. 5th. [1891]*

Dear S. O. J.,

    It seems as if I had a million things to tell you, but do not be afraid. I am not going to do it! But I am going to say, how do you do today?  And thank you very very much for a letter some time ago, a quick answer to my last note!  I have had news of you once or twice since by way of Mrs. Fields,* who delighted me one day by reading me a piece of a letter from you about your coasting: "Just like the other boys"!*  It must have been a lovely coast, & I envy you the experience!

[ Page 2 ]

What have you been doing since? Anything as exciting? --

    I shall try to see Mrs Fields on Saturday, & shall hear of you then.  I have filched a nice photograph (taken at Mrs. Howe's place at Manchester*)  from Ellis,* but shall ask Mrs Fields first whether you are to be in town on a flying visit reasonably soon, & if you are, I will leave it with ^her for^ you. -- Otherwise you shall have it by mail -- I have been doing a little painting on my own hook, & have painted a sketch from a Pepperell sketch* which I wish you could see, because I think it really says a little of what I tried to put into it -- Mrs Whitman* thinks it is better than the original sketch. -- I have had it "simmering" on an easel in my room for quite a time, & was much astonished myself

[ Page 3 ]

that it turned out anything in the end!

    I have not been able to begin in earnest, at Ritter's,* & can't tell whether I ever shall get so far. [Unrecognized mark] I have had some more throats & things, and I thought it was a good plan to see Dr. Helen Morton.*  She is giving me iron & makes me eat 6 meals a day!  She also inserts mild hints about "going away", to which however I turn a deaf ear.

    Ellis is off to New York, on a spree, to New York with a dearest friend & chum, for four days & he has been working so hard, good boy, & I am glad he can have this little outing.

    Have you read "The Light that Failed"* & how do you feel about it? --

    Do you realize how very real & very good & true much of the "Artist talk" is? -- I should like to know what you think of this story -- Mrs. Whitman

[ Page 4 ]

was here Tuesday & I gave it to her to read.

    I have had good news from Marianne B.* lately which has been very cheering.

    We are expecting Papa's little singer, Elizabeth Cronyn* to stay with us, but have been expecting her since [Jan. 1st ?] & begin to think she will not come at all! -- Later, towards spring, a whole raft of German-Mexicans & German-Californian relations are going to descend upon us, did I tell you? --

    Now I am not going to write about anything else, because, perhaps, you don't happen just this minute to feel like reading about my unimportant & rather uninteresting concerns.  This letter is more to say that I think of you always & send you much love.

Yours, Loulie.

[ Page 5 ]

This paper has to wear
an under-jacket inside
its outside-coat. It is a humbug!

Now I am going to my martyrdom,
    i.e. the dentist's, -- & will
    mail this on the way.

Feb 5th 1891 --



Notes

1891:  The date that Dresel writes at the very end of the manuscript is unclear in the fourth digit.  The light mark looks more like a 0 or 2 than a 1, though it could be a 1.  I have chosen 1891 however, because Kipling's The Light that Failed first appeared in its entirety in the January 1891 issue of Lippincott's Magazine.  It is possible, of course, that Dresel read the novel the following year or even later, so 1891 remains a speculative date.

Mrs. Fields:  See Correspondents.

boys:  See SOJ to Annie Adams Fields, uncertainly dated 4 December 1885.

Ellis:  Dresel's younger brother.

Mrs. Howe's place: Alice Greenwood Howe. See Correspondents.

Pepperell sketch:  If Dresel's painting is from her own sketch, then it may have been made in Pepperell, MA north of Boston, near the New Hampshire border.  Otherwise, Dresel's reference remains unknown.

Mrs. Whitman: Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

Ritter's:  According to the Vose Gallery, landscape painter and lithographer, Louis Ritter (1854-1892) "was born in Cincinnati, Ohio and received his early training at the McMicken School of Design between 1873 and 1874.  He later traveled to Munich to paint with the charismatic artist Frank Duveneck. Ritter followed Duveneck to Florence and Venice, but by 1883, perhaps following friends Theodore Wendel and Charles Mills, Ritter came to Boston and took a studio at 12 West Street. He began to teach in Boston and at Wellesley College, while painting landscapes along the north shore."  Possibly his grave.

Dr. Helen MortonDr. Helen Morton (1834-1916) had offices successively on Marlboro, Boylston, and Chestnut streets in Boston. Richard Cary says that Jewett once characterized her as "touchy {touching?} in her doctorly heart and more devoted in her private capacity as a friend."

"The Light that Failed"... "Artists talk": The Light that Failed (1891) was British author Rudyard Kipling's (1865-1936) first novel. It tells the story of Dick Heldar, a painter who goes blind.

Marianne B.:  Marianne Brockhaus.  See Correspondents.

Elizabeth CronynElizabeth A. Cronyn (1852 - 1921?), the daughter of Dr. John Cronyn (1827-1898), a founder of the Medical Department of Niagara University.  In addition to her music degree from D'Youville College in Buffalo, NY, she studied with Otto Dresel, Louisa's father, in Dresden, Germany.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Thomas Bailey Aldrich

South Berwick Maine
27 February 1891

My dear Friend

    When I came home from a short visit to A.F.* in Charley Street I found your new book of poems* waiting for me. I am tempted to keep my thanks until I see you for it is so hard to put into a note all that I wish to say about my pleasure and

[ Page 2  ]


gratitude. It seems to me that you have never printed so beautiful a collection before! The poems that I thought I knew best seem newest to me as I look through the book.  I think that you must spare yourself, this time, a writer's usual misgivings when he holds a new book in hand and reconsiders the plan of

[ Page 3  ]

it ----

    I missed you and Lilian* very much, and I am glad to have a firm [ hour corrected ] that you will both be at  home when I go to town again, as I mean to, in a fortnight.

    With my love and best thanks I am ever your affectionate friend

Sarah O. Jewett



Notes

A. F.: Annie Fields (1834-1915).  See Correspondents.

book of poems: Aldrich published three volumes in 1890 and 1891.  These include:  XXXVI lyrics and XII sonnets, selected from Cloth of Gold and Flower and Thorn and Wyndham Towers in 1890, and in 1891, The Sisters' Tragedy and Other Poems Lyrical and Dramatic

Lilian: Lilian Woodman Aldrich. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Bailey Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2739.


SOJ to Horace Scudder

       South Berwick, Maine

     February 28, [1891]

     Dear Mr. Scudder:

      I think that you are right about using the name of a state. I can change Iowa to Wi-owa or Kan-sota and I will not forget it when I see the proofs.1
 
     Yours truly,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

     1 The Honorable Joseph K. Laneway is presented as a Senator from the state of Kansota in "A Native of Winby," Atlantic Monthly, LXVII (May 1891), 609-620; collected in A Native of Winby and Other Tales.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine. 



SOJ to Mark A. deWolfe Howe

South Berwick, Maine
3rd of March, 1891
To the Editors of the Youth's Companion

Gentlemen:

I thank you for your very kind and cordial note and for the Messrs. Perry Mason Company's cheque received this morning.

Yours sincerely,

Sarah Orne Jewett


Notes

Perry Mason Company:  The Perry Mason Company was the owner of the Youth's Companion magazine, founded in 1827.

This transcription appears in Nancy Ellen Carlock's 1939 Boston University thesis, S.O.J. A Biography of Sarah Orne Jewett.  Carlock says that at the time of the transcription, the manuscript was in the "private collection of manuscripts" in Howe's library. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Dresel


     South Berwick, Maine
     March 4, 1891

     My dear Loulie:

     I hear of your flitting Southward and I am sending you a line to assure you of my good wishes, but also my vain regrets that you can't go this time to my beloved and beautiful St. Augustine! You will find a good part of your way very monotonous, but it is only after one comes back from a strange country that one can fully take the strangeness of it in. And our America is so different from Europe -- you see everything on a larger scale, that makes England, for instance, a country in miniature. The immensity of America strikes me more and more as I grow older -- the Great South -- the Great West with their unlimited possibilities waiting to be moulded and shaped and decorated by the hand of man and turned into such crammed and perfectly developed sections of the globe as any across the sea. But most of us feel more at home with a tamed and civilized part of the world -- it is still a little dreary to me to hurry all day across a piece of Southern Country that looks nearly as much alike as if the cars stood still!

     I am coming back to town next week for some days and I shall miss seeing you. I have been looking forward with great pleasure to seeing Bernhardt1 and I do hope that Mrs. Fields will be well enough to go too. My dear mother has been ever so much better for a week or more which is a great joy, you can believe.

     I am sending you a little book which may be old to you but I wished you to have a copy that I gave you. I have for years made it my chief counsellor and consoler and inspirer in the way of a book. My friend Ellen Mason2 gave me a copy of Fénélon -- why it must be twenty years ago, and it is the religious book of my life -- so ready for everyday need and so modern and completely unaffected and unsuperstitious it seems to me. Of course there is only a brief selection in this edition3 but it was all I could get hold of, and I have been keeping it some time to send to you when I was next visiting. I do hope that you find the kind and wise 'Bishop of Cambray' as helpful a friend as I have found him.

     Do give my love to Miss Sarah Clarke!4 It was a great pleasure to me to meet her last year, and a real inspiration. I can imagine what a pleasure it will be to her to have you and Mrs. Dresel come down to her neighborhood, and I hear that Mrs. King is going too, which will be so dear for all of you.* I shall hope to hear from you! and if you stay late enough you must stop in the Natural Bridge regions as you come North.5

     There is such a great blowing snowstorm today as if winter were beginning all over again. I quite envy you the miracle it always seems to those who go far South quickly out of our Northern winter. I never shall forget what a miracle it seemed to me the first time I did it! You feel as if you had been let out of jail and as if it must be impossible to play out of doors!

     I must say good bye with much love and many good wishes to you and 'Mamma.'

     Yours affectionately,

     S. O. J.
 

Cary's Notes

     1Sarah Bernhardt, on another triumphal tour of the country with her French company, was scheduled for one week at the Tremont in La Tosca, La Dame aux Camélias, and Cléopatra. Tickets were being sold at auction, and Jewett wrote Annie Fields: "the harder they are going to be to get the more I wish to get them! ...  I am going to pawn my best clothes and get some tickets by hook or crook. I do wish very much to see Cleopatra."

     2Ellen Francis Mason (1846-1930), who lived on Beacon Hill in Boston, devoted much of her time to charitable enterprises and to sponsorship of the arts, particularly music.

     3François de Salignac Fénélon (1651-1715), appointed to the see of Cambrai by Louis XIV whose grandson he tutored, produced some thirty-five volumes on religion, education, and mysticism. Jewett revered him as "a seer of character," saw threads of his influence in Maeterlinck, and distributed copies of Selections from Fénélon (Boston, 1890) to several of her friends.

     4 [Jewett refers to her in a later letter: May 16, 1898]*

     5A continuing tourist attraction, the Bridge is a limestone arch spanning ninety feet of Cedar Creek in Rockbridge County, western Virginia, near Lexington.

Editor's Notes

Mrs. King:  The identity of Mrs. King remains unknown.  Possibly she is related to Miss Caroline Howard King, a mutual friend.  See Correspondents.

Miss Sarah Clarke:  Though Cary points out that she is mentioned in another letter, he does not identify her.  That she resides in the south suggests the possibility of Sarah Freeman Clarke (1808-1896), a step grand-daughter of James Freeman Clarke, after whom she was named.  Born in Massachusetts, she became a painter, studying and working in Italy.  In 1879, she returned from Italy and eventually located in Marietta, GA, where she took up the cause of founding a local library, which opened in 1893.  See  Georgia's Remarkable Women: Daughters,Wives, Sisters, and Mothers Who Shaped History by Sara Hines Martin, 2015, pp. 19-32.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College.




204

SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Thursday evening

[ 5 March 1891 ]

Dear Fuff*

    (Please put it down on your order book that I am going to Lily Fairchild's* to luncheon on [ deleted word ] Thursday the 12th at half past [ twelve corrected ] o'clock. Perhaps you are going too) ?? 

    [ Double underlined unrecognized word ] who dont speak a word about the Bernhardt tickets* are now tweaked [ by corrected ] by both ears ^( if found)*^ -- I hope it is a Cleopatra* night or else

[ Page 2 ]

Camille. If it isn't Cleopatra I am going to pawn my best clothes and get some ^tickets^ by hook or by crook. I do wish very much to see the Cleopatra. (I think you of and Mary* sitting by the fire tonight, and I suppose it is getting near to bedtime.) Yes it is quite magnificent about the copyright bill* and I like to have my country

[ Page 3 ]

honest at least about the Spoliation Claims. I told Mother yesterday that she must buy a piece of plate and have it marked French Spoliation Claims 1891, and have it handed down.*

     You never saw such a lot of snow in your town-y life as is now piled up in this single hamlet! It is really a huge lot and so drifted and tumbled about and every little while today the northwest wind would blow and the air would be full

[ Page 4 ]

for a while. Jocky* seems to think it is a very hard winter.

    How topping good about the looms! You never said how much you were toing to get!

    I wish you wold send me the Post* of yesterday and today if it is not too much trouble. Good night dear Fuff.  I hope to get along early in the week but I dont want to hurry Mary in her works and ways.*

    I hope Mary is interested in Crabby -- I didn't think to ask her personally! Crabby would be engulphed [ so spelled ] now in the snow if he were a country dog.

Good by with

dear love from Pinny*





Notes

5 March 1891
:  Fields penciled 1891 in the upper right of page 1. This view is supported by the notes below.  Thursday 5 March is the week before the Bernhardt performances in Boston.
     Most parenthesis marks in the letter also were penciled by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Lily Fairchild's:  See Sally Fairchild in Correspondents.

Bernhardt tickets: Richard Cary notes "Sarah Bernhardt, on another triumphal tour of the country with her French company, was scheduled for one week [ that of 9 March ] at the Tremont in La Tosca, La Dame aux Camélias, and Cléopatra.
    Wikipedia says: "La Tosca is a five-act drama by the 19th-century French playwright Victorien Sardou. It was first performed on 24 November 1887 at the Théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin in Paris, with Sarah Bernhardt in the title role." It is the basis for the libretto of Giacomo Puccini's Italian opera, Tosca.
    Wikipedia also says: "La Dame aux Camélias (literally The Lady with the Camellias, commonly known in English as Camille) is a novel by Alexandre Dumas fils, first published in 1848 and subsequently adapted by Dumas for the stage. La Dame aux Camélias premiered at the Théâtre du Vaudeville in Paris, France on February 2, 1852. The play was an instant success, and Giuseppe Verdi immediately set about putting the story to music. His work became the 1853 opera La Traviata."
    Finally, Wikipedia says that the melodrama, Cléopatra (1890) also was by Victorien Sardou (1831-1908).

found):  Found is underlined twice.  The parentheses around "if found" are by Jewett.

Cleopatra: The name "Cleopatra" has been corrected in pencil, probably by Fields.

the copyright bill
: In March 1891, the United States Congress passed copyright legislation that extended protection to periodicals.

French Spoliation Claims, 1891: These are the French Spoliation Claims arising from the French Revolution, during which France blockaded England and caused losses to American shipping in 1793-1798. In an agreement, the Convention of 1800, the United States effected an exchange of favors by which the U.S. Government took over responsibility for the claims. After much discussion and delay, the government agreed to a settlement of these claims that involved paying a portion of them over the period between 1885 and 1925. The first Congressional act to authorize payment of these claims passed in March 1891.

Jocky: A Jewett dog, sometimes called Jock.

Post: Presumably the newspaper, the Boston Post.

works and ways:  In her letters, Jewett several times repeats this phrase, sometimes within quotation marks.  The actual phrase does not appear, as one might expect, in the King James Bible, though it is suggested in several places: Psalms 145:17, Daniel 4:37, and Revelations 15:3.  In each of these passages, the biblical author refers to the works and ways of God.  Jewett may be quoting from another source or from commentary on these passages, which tend to emphasize that while God's ways are mysterious, they also are to be accepted humbly by humanity.

Pinny: Pinny Lawson is a nickname for Jewett.
    The final three lines of the letter are marked with a large end parenthesis, penciled by Fields.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields transcription

This passage appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 55.

     Yes, it is quite magnificent about the copyright bill, and I like to have my country honest at last about the Spoliation Claims. I told Mother yesterday that she must buy a piece of plate and have it marked French Spoliation Claims, 1891, and have it handed down.

    You never saw such a lot of snow in your towny life as is now piled up in this single hamlet. It is really a huge lot, and so drifted and tumbled about, and every little while to-day the northwest wind would blow, and the air would be full for awhile. Jocky seems to think it is a very hard winter.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Sunday evening, Autumn. [20 December 1890 / March 1891]*

  

     I hope that you have had a good day. I have been to church myself for a wonder, since from one reason or another I have not been preached at for some months! This afternoon, after the communion service, I had a great pleasure in seeing the very old church silver which is not often used, and some time I wish to show it to you. One exquisite old flagon is marked 1674, and the cups are such beautiful shapes. They keep it packed away in the bank, -- very properly, -- and usually use a new set bought thirty or forty years ago. I dare say that some of the old came from England, -- it is really so interesting with all the givers' names and inscriptions put on in such quaint pretty lettering.

     Yes, it is quite magnificent about the copyright bill,* and I like to have my country honest at last about the Spoliation Claims. I told Mother yesterday that she must buy a piece of plate and have it marked French Spoliation Claims, 1891, and have it handed down.*

     You never saw such a lot of snow in your towny life as is now piled up in this single hamlet. It is really a huge lot, and so drifted and tumbled about, and every little while to-day the northwest wind would blow, and the air would be full for awhile. Jocky seems to think it is a very hard winter.*

     Mr. Putnam has just got back from London, and I find that I shall probably begin my proofs# within a fortnight. I am forgetting the worrisome detail a little now, and dread taking it up again, but perhaps they will hurry through and shorten my miseries. "Vanity Fair"* is read through, a very great book, and for its time Tolstoi and Zola and Daudet and Howells and Mark Twain and Turgenieff and Miss Thackeray* of this day all rolled into one, so wise and great it is and reproachful and realistic and full of splendid scorn for meanness and wickedness, which scorn the Zola school* seems to lack. And the tenderness and sweetness of the book is heavenly, that is all I can say about it. I am brimful of things to say.

Fields's note

#The story of the Normans.

Notes

20 December 1890 / March 1891:  This is a composite of at least two letters.  Paragraphs 2 and 3 are from a letter of March 1891.  The final paragraph almost certainly is from December of 1890.  The origin and actual date of the first paragraph remains as yet unknown.
    See notes below.

the copyright bill: In March 1891, The United States Congress passed copyright legislation that extended protection to periodicals.

French Spoliation Claims, 1891: These are the French Spoliation Claims arising from the French Revolution, during which France blockaded England and caused losses to American shipping in 1793-1798. In an agreement, the Convention of 1800, the United States effected an exchange of favors by which the U.S. Government took over responsibility for the claims. After much discussion and delay, the government agreed to a settlement of these claims that involved paying a portion of them over the period between 1885 and 1925. The first Congressional act to authorize payment of these claims passed in March 1891.

Jocky: this unidentified "personage" is a Jewett dog, sometimes called Jock.

Mr. Putnam: Probably George Haven Putnam (1844-1930), who was an editor at G. P. Putnam's Sons, publisher of The Story of the Normans.  In December 1890, Jewett completed revisions for a British edition of The Normans. However, in this paragraph it appears she has not yet completed those revisions.

"Vanity Fair": William Makepeace Thackeray, an English fiction writer, published Vanity Fair in 1847-8.

Daudet and Howells and Mark Twain and Turgenieff and Miss Thackeray: Alphonse Daudet (1840-1897), French novelist and author of sketches. William Dean Howells (1837-1920) was the American author of The Rise of Silas Lapham (1885), and served as editor at The Atlantic and Harper's. Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens, 1835-1910) was the American author of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885). Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883) was the Russian author of Fathers and Sons (1862). Miss Thackeray is William M. Thackeray's daughter, also a novelist, Anne Isabella Thackeray, Lady Ritchie (1837-1919).

the Zola school: Émile Zola (1840-1902) was considered the leader of a French school of naturalistic fiction.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


Wednesday morning

[ March 1891 ]*


Dearest Fuff.*

    Didn't we have a beautiful time? I love to think about it dearly! -- and to look forward already to seeing you again.  The car was hot and stuffy and though fresh air got in at intervals I read fast all the way to Portsmouth and began to have a headache [ deleted word ? ] at that point which

[ Page 2 ]

lasted me until I went to bed! [Green penciled marks by Fields ] But I think The Cigarette makes a charming story. It seems like the play work of a really great writer, a story thrown off in the leisure moments of somebody of great ability. I believe that Crawford* has great ability myself -- as you have always said -- "the story-teller's gift{.}"

     (I forgot to give Mr. Millet*

[ Page 3 ]

his ticket to the St. Botolph* but I am sending it back this morning. It will do you to make a pair of Psychical incidents when I tell you that Mr. Bok* had written Mr. Millet about seeing him for something this week by the same mail that brought my letter to  him! But he seemed pleased by the suggestion.)

    (I* found Mother about the same but I think there are signs of her not keeping

[ Page 4 ]

quite so well as she has been ). I am so glad for every reason that I could get to you this time -- And when I read the poor little letter I felt gladder than before.  Dear Fuffy I feel sure that being so ill makes everything harder to bear and now you are better life will be a good deal easier -- though never easy for us who are in the middle of its waves. The best we can say to one another is Courage and Patience! but first of all Love and Hope! and that we do have in both our hearts -- and if it were

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 1 ]

only to be in the world for the sake of the joy it is to have one another I should think it worth while! -- to have you and to love you is so dear to me and indeed life is very full of satisfactions for both of us & we must forget the hard things in the brighter ones. There [ is ? ] more snow than

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margins of pages 2 and 3 ]

ever here! such a great pile! I must not forget to tell you how much Mother liked the wine [ jelly ?   ]-- it was a great pleasure and she ate as much of it as she really ought! right [ top margin p. 3 ] off !! With dear love your own Pinny.*


Notes

March 1891:  This date is based upon Jewett's report that she is reading a Francis Marion Crawford novel published late the previous year and her referring to the annual exhibition of the St. Botolph Club. See notes below.
    Fields has penciled various marks in green in this letter.  At the beginning, she appears to have placed and then deleted several parenthesis marks..
    Most parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled in green by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

CrawfordFrancis Marion Crawford (1854 - 1909) was a prolific American fiction writer, author of A Cigarette-Maker's Romance (1890).

Mr. Millet: Probably journalist and publisher Josiah Byram Millet (1853-1938), Fields's next-door neighbor in Boston.

St. Botolph: The St. Botolph Club for gentlemen included in its membership the business and artistic elite of Boston.  Among its activities were annual art exhibitions. In 1891, there was an exhibition of watercolors and pastels by the recently deceased Dennis Miller Bunker (1861-1890) that ran from 25 March to 15 April.

Mr. BokWikipedia says:"Edward William Bok  (October 9, 1863 - January 9, 1930) was a Dutch-born American editor and Pulitzer Prize-winning author. He was editor of the Ladies' Home Journal for 30 years (1889-1919)."  Jewett had placed several pieces at this magazine during Bok's editorship, most recently, "An Every-Day Girl" (v. 9, 1892: June pp. 5-6, July pp. 7-8, August pp. 5-6).

(I:  Though penciled by Fields this mark is in black rather than green.

Mary: Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel

South Berwick
14 April [1891]1

 Dear Loulie

I am so sorry to hear indirectly of your being so ill in New York but I hope that you will soon get home and feel better! -- I do so wish that I had had a chance to show you St, Augustine!2

 -- It is very disappointing isn't it? to see almost nothing of the South one read about -- the great plantation houses and all that sort of things but they are these -- as one may find after searching! These eyes have seen Monticello!3

I have been ill myself with such a bad cold which seemed to be amost at least first cousin to the grippe. I feel quite shaken! Next week I hope to go to write you a long letter now, only to send you an affectionate word of greeting with love.

Yours ever faithfully

S. O. J.


Stoddart's Notes

1 This note is dated "1891" in pencil,

2Oldest city in the United States, located in St. John's county, Florida. Jewett and Fields traveled there in 1888 and 1890.

3Home of Thomas Jefferson, located in Albemarle county, Virginia.


Editor's Notes

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Frederick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Lilian Woodman Aldrich


South Berwick    

Wednesday 29th April [1891]

My dear Lilian

    I wish to tell you how much I enjoyed my little visit to you yesterday and all your dear kindness which somehow carried me back in the [ sweetest corrected ] way to the first days that I knew that kindness and all our pleasant days at

[ Page 2  ]

Ponkapog.  Some day we must be driving about the country roads together and try again to see how much we can remember of that little white book of Lyrics and Sonnets!*

    I took my half past three train and reached home at six to find my dear mother still

[ Page 3  ]

very comfortable -- I shall never be contented until I have had you & T.B.A.* come to see us in the old house. I dont know why Fate has put so many other things first, but these are uncertain days, though there could hardly be any day when I should not be glad if I saw you come walking in.  I hope

[ Page 4  ]

that Mr. Pierce* is still undergoing his severe course of treatment?  I can't help wondering what you gave him for luncheon today. Almost anything would seem such a "comedown" after yesterday!

    -- Next time I shall not forget my dear little vase. I am just as fond of it as if it were before my eyes.

Yours always affectionately

"Sadie"*

Notes

1891: This letter must have been composed after the appearance of Aldrich's XXXVI Lyrics and XII Sonnets and before the death of Jewett's mother, Caroline Augusta, in October 1891.  29 April fell on a Wednesday in 1885 and in 1891.  As Jewett's mother clearly was unwell in 1891, but is not yet known to have been seriously ill during 1885, 1891 seems the more probable date of this letter.

Lyrics and Sonnets:  Thomas Bailey Aldrich published his collection XXXVI Lyrics and XII Sonnets in 1880 or 1881 (sources differ).  The 1881 edition seems to have a white cover.

T.B.: Thomas Bailey Aldrich. See Correspondents.

Mr. Pierce:  Henry Lille Pierce. See Correspondents.

Sadie: Sadie Martinot was a Jewett nickname with the Aldriches, presumably after the American actress and singer, Sarah/Sadie Martinot. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Baily Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2721.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Friday morning

[ 1 May 1891 ]*

Dearest Fuff*

    I have been on a trading v'y'ge to hold the horse for John while he got a bunch of shingles to mend the well-house roof. And we also went down to the boat house to see what must be done about painting &c -- I begin to feel in a hurry about going down river! I particularly wish to take some photographs before the leaves are fully out.

[ Page 2 ]

Here is the first of May, and no Pinny* going maying for press of other business, only she May fetch a compass "round* by the woods  later in the day. ------ (I wonder what you are going to do. Is it Board Meeting (as usual?) )*

    There is such a bustle out of doors now all the farmers are out and they come hurrying into the village for seeds and shovels

[ Page 3 ]

and all sorts of things. After this time they have to be just as hard at work as possible, until after haying.

    There is a new paper of Miss Thackerays!* I found it last night in Littell.  So if Miss Hunt* does not find it & send it I will bring it next week when I come. It is a charming one -- about a -- but perhaps I wont tell! (I dare say that Miss Hunt

[ Page 4 ]

will think we had [ this corrected ] one as it must have come already when I saw her and I told her to send any that came after this.

    Goodby dear little Fuff -- with
 much love from P.L )


Notes

1 May 1891:  Someone, probably Fields, has penciled in the top right: "[ May 1st ? ]" Indeed, Jewett does indicate that she is writing on the actual first day of May rather than merely near the beginning of the month. In the years between 1888 and 1902, when she is most likely to have written this letter, May 1 fell on Friday in 1891 and 1896. Lady Ritchie had a piece reprinted in Littell's for 2 May 1891.  Therefore, this date seems highly likely to be right. See notes below.
    Most parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.
    Fields has deleted "Fuff".

John: John Tucker. See Correspondents.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

"round: The quotation mark before "round" seems clear, but no second one appears.

Board Meeting (as usual?) ): Jewett has placed parentheses around the phrase, and Fields has penciled another at the end.
    Fields regularly attended board meetings for the Associated Charities of Boston.

new paper of Miss Thackerays: British author Anne Isabella, Lady Ritchie (1837 - 1919) was the eldest daughter of  novelist William Makepeace Thackeray. Her "My Witches' Caldron" part 2, appeared in Littell's Living Age 189 (2 May 1891, pp. 295 - 8), reprinted from Macmillan's Magazine. This memoir became a chapter in Chapters from Some Unwritten Memoirs (1895).

Miss Hunt: In a letter to Fields from April 1901, Jewett mentions a Miss Hunt at Darnrells as a supplier of magazines.  In that letter, the transcription of "Darnrells" is uncertain.  Neither Miss Hunt nor the business has been identified.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Greenleaf Whittier


South Berwick
Sunday 3rd of May [1891]*


My dear friend.

 It seems such a long time since I heard of you directly, and longer still since I saw you.  I kept thinking that I should find a chance to go to see you while you were at Newburyport, but though I went to Boston twice or perhaps three times, it always happened that I had to hurry to town and hurry home again at the beginning and end of each of the visits.  The last time I saw our dear A. F.* she seemed much better and that made me better contented to come away.  I think that she was meant for a child of the tropics for in these bright hot spring days when others wilt, she only blooms and is possessed of more energy than usual.  I have not much news to tell you.  My mother is very comfortable just now, compared to her more suffering state in the winter.  She gets out to drive now and then which always makes the long day go faster and a better sleep at night.  We are very busy about our Academy Centennial* which comes off the first of July.  Aren't you glad that you never come [came?] to Varvik* to school, or they would be making you write a poem.  I wish that I could have written one for I have a great feeling about the old school house on the hill, but it grows almost impossible for me to write verses as I grow older, while when I was a child everything sung itself into verse in my mind and a composition was an awful object of first dread, and then failure.  It was just as hard for me to write prose at first as it is to write verse now.  However there is a good old gentleman, Mr. Amos Pike (one of the old Parson Pike family of Rollinsford)* who has a gift that way and I put in for him to write the poem, and he was pleased about it.  You would like him, he has been a farmer & school teacher all his days and wears a parsonish coat and might be a Scottish dominie.

     I wonder if you read my May story in the Atlantic?*   I hoped that you would like it, but I wrote a new one in a day last week when I ought to have been in “meetin”.  It would be written, and is all about a country father who wished his little girls to see something of the world and how other folks do things so he takes them to Topsham Corners, sixteen miles, and they have a great day.*  It made me cry a little now and then, somehow it brought back the feeling I used to have.

    I wish to get it copied and printed just as quick as I can and send it to you to read.

    I hope that you are feeling pretty well this spring, and that winter has been kind to the trees and bushes at Oak Knoll* and in your Amesbury garden.  I should like to see the old pear trees in bloom, You must write about their white flowers some day.  My love to the More's & Phebe* and to you from Sarah.

 
Notes

A transcriber's note with this text reads: [Whittier].

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Academy Centennial:  Richard Cary says: "The centennial celebration of the founding of Berwick Academy, of which Miss Jewett and her sister Mary were alumnae, was to be held on July 1, 189l."

Varvik:  Jewett is likely referring to an archaic spelling and pronunciation of "Berwick."  See her essay, "The Old Town of Berwick."

Mr. Amos Pike (one of the old Parson Pike family of Rollinsford):  For the celebration, Amos W. Pike provided "The Centennial Hymn" of four stanzas, which was to be sung to the melody of "Old Hundred."  See A Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Berwick Academy, p. 3.

May story in the Atlantic:  Jewett's "A Native of Winby" appeared in Atlantic Monthly (67:609-620), May 1891.

great day:  The transcriber identifies this story as "The Hilton's Holiday," which appeared in Century Magazine (24:772-778), September 1893.

Oak Knoll ... More's ... Phebe:  The identity of the "More's" has not yet been discovered.  Assistance is welcome.
    Richard Cary says: "In 1875 Whittier's cousins, the Misses Johnson and Abby J. Woodman, purchased a farm of sixty acres in Danvers and invited him to make his home there whenever he wished. The place was notable for beautiful lawns, orchards, gardens, and grapevines. Whittier suggested the name of "Oak Knoll," which was immediately adopted.... Phebe Woodman Grantham was the adopted daughter of Whittier's cousin Abby J. Woodman. In her childhood she lived at Oak Knoll and was the object of much affection by Whittier, who wrote the poem "Red Riding Hood" for her. She became extremely possessive of Whittier in later life and, from accounts in Albert Mordell's biography and a letter by Miss Jewett to Samuel T. Pickard, could be un­seemly sharp in defending her interest."
    Whittier's birthplace and childhood home, which he also maintained through his life was in Amesbury, MA, about 25 miles north of Danvers.  Cary says: "George Washington Cate (1834­1911 ) came to Amesbury as a lawyer in 1866, was appointed judge ten years later. He served in the Massachusetts Senate and locally as trustee of several civic organizations. He married Caroline C. Batchelder of Amesbury in 1873. After Whittier went to live at Oak Knoll, the Cates occupied the Amesbury residence and kept it open for him and his friends until the end of his life."

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




 SOJ to Hamlin Garland


South Berwick Maine
 6 May 1891

Dear Professor Garland

 You were very kind to think of taking trouble to secure me a place at the Herne play* and I wish that I could avail myself of your kindness. I am to be in town for Thursday night but unfortunately my engagements do not leave me free. With my best thanks. I am

Yours sincerely

 S. O. Jewett

Notes

Herne play: Nagel identifies this play as James A. Herne's Margaret Fleming, "which had opened two days earlier, on 4 May, in Chickering Hall in Boston." The play did not fare well in Boston, presumably because "the problem of marital infidelity was treated with freedom and candor" (p. 422).

Transcriber James Nagel says "This letter is Item 225 in the Hamlin Garland collection of the University of Southern California Library, Los Angeles, CA." Nagel published and discussed his transcription in "Sarah Orne Jewett Writes to Hamlin Garland." The New England Quarterly 54.3 (September 1981), pp. 416-23. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.

Reprinted by permission of the New England Quarterly.


 
SOJ to Andrew Preston Peabody

     South Berwick, Maine

     May 11, 1891

     My dear Doctor Peabody:

      My sister is just sending you an invitation to our Great Day,1 and we hope that you can find it possible to say yes. So many persons in town beside ourselves have wished for the honour of your presence. Dr. John Lord has written a delightful historical address, and the early days of the old Academy were most interesting, even if some of the later ones have not been!2
 
     My mother and my sister and I hope that you will give us the pleasure of coming to stay with us. I hope that you will not say that South Berwick is near Portsmouth, and so deprive us of a little visit!

     Believe me, ever with great regard,

     Yours sincerely,

     Sarah O. Jewett

     Please give my love to Carrie.3 I wish that it were not so long since I saw her last. Perhaps she can come with you?


Notes
 
     1 The centennial celebration of the founding of Berwick Academy, of which Miss Jewett and her sister Mary were alumnae, was to be held on July 1, 189l.
    2 For this occasion A Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Berwick Academy, South Berwick, Maine was published. A volume of 118 pages, it includes contributions by the school's most illustrious graduates: a "Preface" by Miss Jewett, "The Historical Address" by the Reverend Lord, and "The Oration" by the Reverend William Hayes Ward. The Reverend Peabody provided the opening "Prayer."
     3 Caroline Eustis Peabody (1848-1932) was one of Dr. Peabody's eight children. From his letter (Colby College Library) to Miss Jewett on July 3, 1891, it appears that Carrie did not attend, and that the "arrangements were superlatively good, and were carried through admirably."

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.


 
 SOJ to F. Hopkinson Smith

     South Berwick, Maine

     May 15, 1891

     My dear Mr. Hopkinson Smith:

      I spent a delightful evening with our valued friend Colonel Carter who arrived yesterday morning from Virginia.1 I have such sympathy for his charm and nobility of character that it delights me to think that you can always help him out of any trouble he may fall into through generosity and loyalty to the traditions of the past. Seriously, you must never let him come to want, you must stand ready to write him into good fortune at any moment!

     The story makes a charming little book. I congratulate you upon giving so much real pleasure and I hope that Colonel Carter may wake this very morning and find himself famous like Byron, but I shall always count myself one of the first and best of his friends.2
 
     With my best thanks, and regards to your wife, believe me ever

     Yours sincerely,

     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes
 
     1 Colonel Carter of Cartersville (Boston, 1891) was the first book to bring widespread public attention to Smith. A devotée of his work, Miss Jewett had written to him about his two earlier books (see Letters 29, 33, 34).
    2 Of Miss Jewett's reaction to his books, Smith wrote (Colby College Library): "Next to the pleasure of writing a story like the Colonel -- and it has been an exquisite pleasure -- is the delight of receiving such letters as yours. Especially yours for you know, which is everything, and you tell me so cheerfully and heartily, which is best of all."

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Saturday mornng

[ 23 May 1891 ]*

My dearest Mouse.*

    (Yesterday morning I was fastening up a vine and heard somebody calling and there was the Thorpe family* all a migrating to Lebanon in two vehicles! Fru Ole came in & Mrs. Thorpe and it was an occasion of great interest. Fru Ole thought she would come and spend Monday here on her way back to Cambridge -- and wished Mary* to go with her

[ Page 2 ]

but)* Mary thinks she "cant get away." I reminded her that even the President sometimes could go a-fishing which may have its effect! -- I was jobbing as S.W.* says, all the morning but in the afternoon I got 26 pages done on the Hiltons,* and thought it was a good deal of copying in the whole.  Last night was an Academy meeting* of great success, and so on the

[ Page 3 ]

whole, (jobbing thrown in)* it was a good day -- Also the breakfast room was thrown in, a papering with its new paper, and looks fresh and bright -- (There are a great many things to talk about -- one small one is that there were a few clean clothes in this week's washing which might be put into the Manchester trunk! I am looking for your letter by the first morning mail -- Oh dear I wish you could come for a day or two { -- } it is so pleasant now and Mother* is so well, for her,

[ Page 4 ]

as the country folks say!

    President Eliot* wrote a good letter to be read, which was a pleasure.

    I suppose that there will be a great occasion, it seems more and more resplendent. I wish it were coming a month earlier for the village never looked lovelier. This delicious cold June weather is [ deleted word ] most delightful to me. I must get everything done today that I possibly can. It must be Enchanting at Manchester -- and all the white anemones coming wide open. Dont you love to think of the path? Oh my dear Fuff! here is a kiss for you

[ Up the left margin of page 1 ]

right in the letter -- from your own Pinny*


Notes

23 May 1891:  This date is confirmed by Jewett's references to the upcoming celebration of the centennial of the Berwick Academy in July. Probably it was written soon after receiving President Eliot's letter, which is likely to have been delivered by 23 May.
    Most parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled by Fields.

Mouse:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents. At the end of the letter, she uses another such nickname, Fuff.

Thorpe family: This is the family of Sara Chapman Thorp Bull, known affectionately as Fru Ole, after her marriage to Norwegian violinist Ole Bull. Jewett has added an "e" to the family name. See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

but): After her parenthesis mark, Fields has inserted: "begin here --".

S.W.:  Sarah Wyman Whitman.  See Correspondents.

Hiltons: Presumably, Jewett refers to "The Hilton's Holiday," which appeared in Century Magazine (46:772-778), September 1893. Jewett also writes to Whittier on a 3 May 1891 letter that she is working on this story that was not published until more than two years later.

Academy meeting: The Berwick Academy centennial took place on 1 July 1891, the academy having been founded in 1791. See Jewett's "The Old Town of Berwick." She helped with the Centennial arrangements of her alma mater, contributing to The Berwick Scholar, the school magazine, an article, "The Centennial Celebration" in v. 4 (March 1891), and editing a memorial booklet of the occasion.

(jobbing thrown in):  These parenthesis marks are Jewett's.

Mother: Caroline Augusta Jewett died in October 1891.

President Eliot: Charles W. Eliot (1834-1926), the President of Harvard University (1869-1909).  His letter regretting his inability to attend the Berwick Academy Centennial celebration is dated 22 May, 1891 and appears in A Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Berwick Academy, South Berwick, Maine: July First, 1891, p. 77.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

May 26, 1891.

      I wish I had a pansy to put here in memory of this day, -- my little Gemma's;* forever an open window into Heaven.


Notes

Gemma:  Sara Gemma Timmins was the niece of Martin Brimmer, first director of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (founded 1870). Joel Poudrier explains that Gemma died in 1890 at the age of 28. Gemma's sister, Minna, was especially close to Whitman, but both sisters were artists and protégées of Whitman. A number of other letters on her death appear in the Whitman letters collection, and at the end is a Whitman poem addressed to Gemma. Source: Raguin, Sarah Wyman Whitman 1842-1904 (pp. 133-4).

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Sunday --

[ 31 May 1891 ]*

This letter is to my dear little Fuff* in Manchester with all the [ songsparrows ? ] a singing at her and one or two crickets creaking under the piazza and all the hop toads on the estate getting up to the top of the [ will ? or wall ? ] to [ look at corrected ] her just as fast as they can.  Hop toads are always a little late but they will all be there. And Fuff to see the [ Bakers corrected ] Island [ light or lights corrected ]* like Pinny* & T.L. standing side by side and see if she hears a crow going over if she

[ Page 2 ]

wakes up early in the morning! Fuff not to forget any of the dear neighbours in Manchester the birds and the other little things and all the green bushes that belong to she! And to please be wishing for Pinny and expecting her and pretty soon she will come --

    Yesterday was Decoration day* and I have told you how touching it always is to me  --  the little procession of "veterans" grows more and more pathetic year

[ Page 3 ]

by year.  In the morning I went down to Pound Hill* to see an old woman who is very sick, an old patient of father's whom I have a kindness for  --  and then John* confided to me that his old captain (afterward Colonel)*  whom he hadn't seen for a great many years, was going to be the speaker in Dover at the afternoon celebration, so we scurried across the Eliot bridge and into Dover and you never saw any thing more touching than John's delight and feeling about the interview.  John said

[ Page 4 ]

"th' Cap'n knew me in a minute.  I was goin' right by him =  Hullo John says he,  that you! an'  I says yes!"

    === I cant stop to write all about the interview -- but I shall have to tell you about {it} when I see you{.}

    I have been to church this afternoon to hear the Memorial Day Sermon and that shall be told about too.

    = (* Dear Fuffatee I am going to send this down ^to the best effect^* tonight to go by the early morning mail -- so I say good night in a hurry and oh I send you my best love and a [ unrecognized word  cherry ? ] and wishes about dear days at Manchester

Your
loving
Pinny )


Notes

31 May 1891:  This tentative date has some evidence to support it.  Decoration Day fell on Saturday in 1885 and 1891.  This holiday was special because of John Tucker meeting with his captain from the Civil War in a year when Jewett notices the dwindling number of surviving veterans.  It seems likely that this event inspired Jewett's stories, "Decoration Day" which appeared in June 1892 and "Peachtree Joe" which appeared in 1893.
    Penciled note in the upper right of page 1: "[ May 31".  Usually such notes are by Fields, but in this case, that is not certain.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. Later in the letter, Jewett uses another of her nicknames for Fields, T.L.  See Correspondents.
    Note that Fields's birthday is a week away; this may explain in part Jewett's unusually effusive opening pages.

Bakers Island Light: A lighthouse in Salem, MA, near Manchester by the Sea.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

Decoration day:  Now called Memorial Day, this is an American holiday honoring military veterans, particularly by decorating with flowers the graves of deceased veterans. 

Pound Hill:  Pound Hill is east of Hamilton House in the Old Fields area of southern South Berwick. Norma Keim of the Old Berwick Historical Society has located it on what is now Fife's Lane, which once was part of the main road from Old Fields to York. This location is just east of Old Fields. See The Maine Spencers, A History and Genealogy by W. D. Spencer (Concord: Rumford Press, 1898) p. 108. It is quite likely that the name derives from the location of the village livestock pound. In the colonial period, many New England villages had pounds where strayed livestock would be kept at village expense until the owners claimed them and payed their fine or pound fee. (See John R. Stilgoe, Common Landscape of America 1580-1845. New Haven: Yale UP, 1982, p. 49).

John: John Tucker. See Correspondents.

old captain: This captain probably appears as a character in Jewett's story, "Peach-tree Joe" (July 1893) in which John Tucker tells Jewett a story from his Civil War service.  His name is not yet known.

= (:  The equal sign and the parenthesis marks around this passage were penciled in by Fields.

best effect^: Jewett has not indicated exactly where she wants this phrase inserted.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.
 


SOJ to Isaac R. Webber

South Berwick
2 June [1891 ]*


Dear Mr. Webber

    Please send Mrs. Fields* a copy of Viceregal Life in India by Lady Dufferin* (Mrs. J. T. Fields Manchester by the Sea. Mass.{)} & charge to me.  Also I send the names of two other books which I should like to have you get and

[ Page 2 ]

send to me here.

Yours truly

S. O. Jewett

Please let Mrs. Fields have the Lady Dufferin book as soon as possible.




Notes

1891: Jewett has dated her letter 2 July and has given no year.  However, in the upper left corner of page 1 is a date in another hand: 6/3/91.  The same date is repeated half way down the left margin: mail 6/3/91. Presumably Mr. Webber has noted when he mailed the requested books, this would appear to be at least 11 months after the request.  Almost certainly, then, Jewett has mistakenly wrote July rather than June.
    This is supported further by there being a letter to Annie Fields dated 6 June, almost certainly from 1891, in which Jewett hopes Fields will like her birthday present, the Lady Dufferin book.
    For information about Mr. Webber, see Dana Estes in Correspondents.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Viceregal Life in IndiaOur Viceregal Life in India (1889), by Hariot Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, Marchioness of Dufferin and Ava (1843-1936) . 

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Sunday night

[ About 6 June 1891 ]


My Dearest Fuff*

    I was sorry when I got your sad little letter last night -- I hoped that Mifs Smith* would come, and tried to think whether I couldn't have gone -- Pinny* would go without a thin skirt made by your Swedish nightingale for the sake of spending a dear little birthday! But Fuff gets everything by having

[ Page 2 ]

her Pinny's clothes respect it like [ thee ? ] love -- and so and so! but Pinny always* to go for the birthday and to have missed this is a thing I shall be sorry to remember.

    Here is this nice letter from Katharine* the faithful and dear and good -- it is full of interesting things, but I think she is no longer hopeful about Alice James{.}*

[ Page 3 ]

I am so sorry, but how lovely this little housekeeping is for them both! -- Did you read Ellen Terry's little paper in the Sunday Herald* today? I like it almost as well as one of Mrs. Ritchies,* it has a good many charming things in it. I mean to keep it so if you missed it we can have the pleasure of reading it together Wednesday evening. Goodnight darling from Pinny.

[ Page 4 ]

I didn't go to church today for I was tired and wanted to stay with Mother beside.)  I have come across an enchanting book called Forty Years in a Moorland Parish* -- the Parish of Danby not far from Whitby. I dont think it is your kind of thing but I love it and find so much in it that is curiously familiar in words & ways ^to a Berwick person^. -- I must Mr. Lowell* if he [ knows corrected ] anything about him if he

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 1 ]

feels like talking when I see him again. I mean to try to get out there this week --


Notes

About 6 June 1891:  This date must be nearly correct.  Jewett reports reading a book published in 1891.  She mentions her mother, who died in October 1891. Presumably because Jewett is caring for her mother, she has been unable to be with Annie Fields for her June 6 birthday.
    The parenthesis mark in this manuscript was penciled by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mifs Smith: Miss Smith has not been identified.  It appears Jewett exchanged letters with Miss Frances M. Smith, probably the author of  Talks with Homely Girls on Health and Beauty (1885), Colonial Families of America (1909), and About Our Ancestors (1919).
    Another possibility is Paulina Cony Smith (b.  8 August 1873). Her father was Robert Dickson Smith of Boston (1838-1888). She married Rev. Alexander V. G. Allen (1841-1908) in January 1907.  In June 1913, she married Edward Staples Drown (1861-1936) of the Harvard Class of 1884, and then authored Mrs. Bell (1931), a biography of Fields's close friend, Helen Choate Bell. 
    Edward Staples Drown was "professor of theology in the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was the author of numerous popular works, including The Apostles’ Creed Today, God’s Responsibility for the War, and There Was War in Heaven."
    See Harvard: Report of the Class of 1857 p. 47, for a brief account of her father's family.
    Among Fields's acquaintance was Sarah/Sally Louisa Smith (1841-1916), daughter of Asa Dodge Smith (1804-1877), a president of Dartmouth College.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

always:  Jewett has underlined this word twice.

Katharine:  Katharine Peabody Loring. See Correspondents.

Alice James:  Alice James (1848- 6 March1892), sister of American author Henry James and philosopher, William James.

Ellen Terry's little paper in the Sunday HeraldDame Alice Ellen Terry (1847 - 1928) was English actress who became "the leading Shakespearean actress in Britain."  Her paper in the Boston Herald has not been identified, but in May 1891, she published "Stray Memories," a brief account of her life, which appeared in The New Review and apparently was reprinted in newspapers around the world.

Mrs. RitchiesAnne Isabella, Lady Ritchie (1837 - 1919), English writer, the eldest daughter of British novelist, William Makepeace Thackeray.

Forty Years in a Moorland Parish: John Christopher Atkinson (1814–1900) an English antiquary and priest, published Forty Years in a Moorland Parish in 1891.

Lowell:  James Russell Lowell. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Saturday morning

My dear Fuff's* birthday

[ 6 June 1891 ]

(and I hope that all the song sparrows are singing very loud!) -- I hope that you have got my letter this morning dear and that ^Miss^ Smith* is coming early in the afternoon. [ I intended It ? ] is lovely weather for a little visit. I do hope that she can come.  I worked hard a good part of yesterday and now I am so much relieved about my [ Bon ? ] story. You cant

[ Page 2 ]

think how hard it is to keep ones mind on that when there are so many pleasing distractions{.} I really wish that you could come for a day or two before the end of the month -- to see  how pretty the village looks. Every body is taking such pains with her front yard! and ^we^ [ having corrected from have ? ] particularly set the fashion there are ever so many people taking making their roadsides as neat and trimmed as square as possible -- Dont you remember

[ Page 3 ]

how we pleased ourselves with viewing the Stockbridge roadside?

    I hope that you will like the Lady Dufferin book.* I found it full of delightful things -- Not great, except in its good sense and pleasantness, and constant good intention of busy responsible lives. I marked all sorts of dear little re-marks. [ so punctuated ] that brighten the pages. I hope that you will find the good lady D. companionable.

    (Only to think of a cold

[ Page 4 ]

hearted cooky! I should have sent things back with a good [ jone ? ] to be het up! But it must have been so pleasant to Nelly to come. You have never told me how to direct to the twins* and so I cant send them a letter by [ todays corrected ] steamers as I meant to -- but never mind. I ought to have written it and sent it right off to Nelly to be directed.  A [ unrecognized word: Rack, slack ? ] Pinny, ladies!

    Good bye [ darling corrected ] and I shall see you Wednesday

Your -- [ P.L. corrected ] )

[ Up the left margin of page 4 ]

(you might show Miss Smith where my little shady trees are!)



Notes

1891: In notes at the top right of page 1, Fields assigns this letter to June 6, 1888, which was her birthday. However, June 6 fell on Wednesday, not Saturday in 1888. June 6 fell on Saturday in 1891. Another letter, almost certainly from 2 June 1891 contains Jewett's request that the Lady Dufferin book be delivered to Annie Fields.

Fuff's:  Fuff is one of Jewett's affectionate nicknames for Annie Adams Fields. Jewett signs the letter P.L. for Pinny Lawson, a nickname between them for Jewett.
    The first pair of parenthesis marks in this letter appear to be Jewett's.  The rest have been penciled in by Annie Fields.

Miss Smith: Miss Smith has not been identified.  It appears Jewett exchanged letters with Miss Frances M. Smith, probably the author of  Talks with Homely Girls on Health and Beauty (1885), Colonial Families of America (1909), and About Our Ancestors (1919).
    Another possibility is Paulina Cony Smith (b.  8 August 1873). Her father was Robert Dickson Smith of Boston (1838-1888). She married Rev. Alexander V. G. Allen (1841-1908) in January 1907.  In June 1913, she married Edward Staples Drown (1861-1936) of the Harvard Class of 1884, and then authored Mrs. Bell (1931), a biography of Fields's close friend, Helen Choate Bell. 
    Edward Staples Drown was "professor of theology in the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was the author of numerous popular works, including The Apostles’ Creed Today, God’s Responsibility for the War, and There Was War in Heaven."
    See Harvard: Report of the Class of 1857 p. 47, for a brief account of her father's family.
    Among Fields's acquaintance was Sarah/Sally Smith (1841-1916), daughter of Asa Dodge Smith, a president of Dartmouth College.

Lady Dufferin book:  Our Viceregal Life in India (1889), by Hariot Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, Marchioness of Dufferin (1843-1936). 

Nelly ... the twins: Almost certainly Jewett refers to the sisters, Helen Olcott Choate Bell and Miriam Foster Choate Pratt as the twins. Mrs Pratt's daughter was the novelist, Nelly Prince.  See Correspondents. The Choate sisters were not actually twins.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Monday morning

[ June 1891 ]*

My dearest Fuff*

    You had such lovely day yesterday for your dear works and ways* that you wont mourn so much about today!  What a good plashing rain! I now speak from the point of view of those whose cistern had to have a new filter put in and

[ Page 2 ]

be cleaned out dry in that process, "just before the Centennial" as it were! I went to town on Saturday leaving here at eight o'clock and getting back at six and I had a very comfortable cool day-- and got the great business of the programme well forward and also helped the Master of the Academy to choose ten nice prize books.  Mr. Webber was

[ Page 3 ]

in most generous humour and it was a pleasant errand. Then I had time for a glimpse at the Art Museum and a little call on Cora* -- I didn't go to the dear house, though I meant to when I started in the morning. I wished to take a look at the picture (of Satty Fairchild)* -- and though it doesn't hang right it looks nobly. Alas! the first look (at Satty) is always

[ Page 4 ]

so interesting and the second so disappointing -- (What you miss in her gives a certain interest to the picture ^that I never felt so much before^ -- it is an imploring of the future with those uplifted arms, a kind of remorse over the present. No, remorse is too strong a word; but light seems to have come in a sudden glimpse, rather than a constant leading.  One doesn't feel the habit of devotion in that young priestess (-- poor

[ Page 5 ]

young Satty. ) She is like her mother but without somethings that are in her mother's nature. Lily herself is unharmonious in the same way. I think that she had greater possibilities at Satty's age than Satty has perhaps -- )) Well, I mustn't write about folkses any more* in this [ unrecognized word ] morning -- but tell imperfect tales about my walking

[ Page 6 ]

up the garden yesterday afternoon and hearing a great buzz-buzzing over among the apple trees and seeing the whole air brown with a swarm of bees, and rushing for one of the old hives and trying to take them, but off they went, [ deleted word ] leaving part of their company about some comb [ which corrected ] they

[ Page 7 ]

had fastened on a bough of a tree -- a thing I never saw before --  Carrie's Minnie* who is an [ deleted word ] experienced country person from Bantry Bay as we have long known! came out ringing a bell as if she were one of those who took the bees in that pretty 'Georgic of Virgil"* --  And There never was any thing simpler or [ prettier corrected from pretty ]. We got the remainder bees and

[ Page 7 ]

their pieces of white new comb in to the hive and there they are I suppose in all the rain --  I coveted the big swarm that went away!  It was such a pretty lucky thing to go out and find them --

    (Goodbye -- somebody will take this to the mail -- I send you so much love dearest Fuffatee

from your

Pinny* )

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 1 ]

(I thank you so much for sending the pendant which came all right. I will be very careful of it dear Fuff)


Notes

June 1891: This letter almost certainly was composed not too long before the 1 July 1891 celebration of the Berwick Academy Centennial.  See notes below.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript were penciled in green by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents. Fields has penciled an "x" after the greeting. This points to her penciled note at the bottom of the page: "a foolish little nick=name which she [ unrecognized word ] to [ mse    mse ?]".  The first "mse" is difficult to read; the second is darker and more readable. Perhaps by "mse" she meant "myself?"

works and ways:  In her letters, Jewett several times repeats this phrase, sometimes within quotation marks.  The actual phrase does not appear, as one might expect, in the King James Bible, though it is suggested in several places: Psalms 145:17, Daniel 4:37, and Revelations 15:3.  In each of these passages, the biblical author refers to the works and ways of God.  Jewett may be quoting from another source or from commentary on these passages, which tend to emphasize that while God's ways are mysterious, they also are to be accepted humbly by humanity.

the Centennial:  The Berwick Academy centennial took place on 1 July 1891, the academy having been founded in 1791. See Jewett's "The Old Town of Berwick." She helped with the Centennial arrangements of her alma mater, contributing to The Berwick Scholar, the school magazine, an article, "The Centennial Celebration" in v. 4 (March 1891), and editing a memorial booklet of the occasion.
    Presumably, the "master of the Academy" was its principal, George A. Dickey.

Mr. Webber: For bookseller Isaac R. Webber, see Dana Estes in Correspondents.

Cora:  Cora Clark Rice. See Correspondents.
    With her green pencil, Fields has deleted "on Cora" and drawn in a large open parenthesis mark before the next sentence.  In black pencil, she has placed an insertion mark pointing to a word that may be "but".
    The "dear house" probably is 148 Charles Street, which implies that this letter was directed to Fields in Manchester by the Sea.

the picture of Satty Fairchild:  See Sally Fairchild in Correspondents.
     The Fairchild family were frequent subjects for American painter John Singer Sargent (1856-1925). The painting Jewett describes seems not to be among the many of his painting that can be viewed on-line. 
    Fields has used her green pencil to delete Jewett's "the" in this phrase and write above it her own more readable "the".

any more: Fields has deleted these words and placed a "+" before them in black pencil.

Minnie:  The Trafton Collection transcription of the final paragraph (see below) adds the information that Minnie is an employee in Carrie Eastman's household.
    The Trafton text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, folder 63, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection.

that pretty 'Georgic of Virgil": At about line 64 of Book 4 of The Georgics, Virgil (Publius Vergilius Maro, 70-19 BC) recommends the prospective beekeeper to "raise a noise / Of tinkling all around, and shake the Cymbals / Of the Mighty Mother" in order to call a swarm of bees to a new hive.
    Jewett has placed a "single"quotation mark before Georgic and a double quotation mark after Virgil.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields Transcription

This appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), pp. 214-5.

     Well, I mustn't write about folkses this busy morning, but tell important tales about my walking up the garden yesterday afternoon, and hearing a great buzz-buzzing over among the apple trees, and seeing the whole air brown with a swarm of bees, and rushing for one of the old hives and trying to take them; but off they went, leaving part of their company about some comb which they had fastened on a bough of a tree, a thing I never saw before. Minnie, who is an experienced country person from Bantry Bay, as we have long known, came out ringing a bell as if she were one of those who took the bees in that pretty "Georgic" of Virgil. There never was anything simpler or prettier. We got the remainder bees and their pieces of white new comb into the hive, and there they are, I suppose, in all the rain. I coveted the big swarm that went away. It was such a pretty, lucky thing to go out and find them.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


Thursday night

[ Spring 1891 ]

Darling Fuff.*

    I wonder if you wont like to hear more about the letter to representatives of the Press,* or about blue badges that some of us have been cutting for the little printer, or about the committee meeting about the decorations, or about going to see Mr. Amos Pike* about the poem and to the Plumer farm* for butter, or a long letter that I have written 

[ Page 2 ]

for Mr. President-of-the-Board-of Trustees's* private eye there where he sits all unthinking in his office in Burling Slip New York* ----- or such things! No, I know my Fuffatee and her tastes but if she were here she would be sitting in each committee and knowing all about things very nice indeed, and gather enthusiasm by the way! I have read about twenty minutes today but it has been a good day.

[ Page 3 ]

Here comes Mary* up to bed a catching of me though I started first and the clock is a striking eleven. (Here is Mabel's* letter which is as if you had walked in where she sat and mildly complained, but liked it all pretty well, dont you think so? ---- It is a funny letter, quite taken up with her surroundings and yet giving you no idea of them. I half think that she had not got my letter when she

[ Page 4 ]

wrote. I wonder if she had!

    Oh yes, she must have had time -- Dont you think that poor Coyle's verses* are interesting? I think "And drink delusion from
her eyes
and smile at ruin on her breast" --

have quite the old ring? I am so glad that you have been able to help him. I am delayed about the programme and dont know whether I shall get my few hours in town or not this week. I am still in doubt about Katie Coolidge.* Good night with dear love to you and "the company" from Pinny*)


Notes

Spring 1891:  This date is confirmed by Jewett's reports on her progress in organizing the Berwick Academy Centennial, which took place on 1 July 1891.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript also were penciled in green by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields; variations included Fuffatee, which appears late in the letter.. See Correspondents.

the Press: The centennial celebration of the founding of Berwick Academy, of which Sarah and Mary Jewett were alumnae, was held on July 1, 189l.

Amos Pike: For the celebration, Amos W. Pike provided "The Centennial Hymn" of four stanzas, which was to be sung to the melody of "Old Hundred."  See A Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Berwick Academy, p. 3.

Plumer farm:  In The Placenames of South Berwick, Wendy Pirsig tells of the Plumer family, who operated the local bakery and owned other property in South Berwick (p. 74).

President: "Horatio Nelson Twombly, nephew of William H. Fogg, was born in South Berwick and had graduated from Berwick Academy in the 1840s. He joined and eventually headed his uncle William H. Fogg's China and Japan Trading Company, continuing as president after both Mr. and Mrs. Fogg's deaths. A bachelor who made his home in New York, Twombly spent many years in Asia with the company, including some time in Shanghai overseeing Fogg family business on the Bund during the Taiping Rebellion. In 1886 Twombly became president of Berwick Academy's board of trustees, and oversaw the construction of Fogg Memorial in 1894. The bronze bell in the tower, specially cast in London, was a Twombly gift to the academy."  Old Berwick Historical Society

Burling Slip:  Burling Slip in New York City, was one of number of boat slips in lower Manhattan in the 19th Century.

Mary: Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Mabel: Probably Mabel Lowell Burnett. See Correspondents.

Coyle's verses: Henry Coyle was a poet who worked as an editor and published in magazines. In 1899, his first book of poetry appeared, The Promise of Morning.  Various sources give his birth year as 1865 and 1869.
    The poem Jewett quotes seems to have appeared in the Detroit Free Press, probably in 1891, though this has not been confirmed.  It is possible that the poem was syndicated for publication in a number of newspapers, making it uncertain where Jewett and Fields found it. It was reprinted in Current Opinion 10 (1892) p. 272.
 
Katie Coolidge: Whom Jewett means when she mentions "Coolidge" and "Katie Coolidge" has not yet been determined. She could mean Katherine/Catherine Scollay Parkman Coolidge or Sarah Chauncey Woolsey, who wrote under the name of Susan Coolidge.  The latter produced a series of books about "Katy," two appearing 1872-3 and others in 1886, 1888 and 1890. See Correspondents.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mabel Lowell Burnett

  South Berwick

Sunday night 7th of June [1891]

My dear Mabel
 
            -------------- Mrs. Fields* has gone to Manchester and seems to have got on very well in moving without me.  I mean to go over as soon as I can, but that world-amazing day, the Berwick Academy Centennial Celebration, * draws near, and my sisters and I are in a great state of excitement and feel ourselves to be of much importance.  Dr. Peabody* is to be here and to stay with us.  He used to know the old school when he lived in Portsmouth. ------------

 

                                                            Yours most affectionately

                                                                        S. O. J.

 
Notes

1891:  This is the year of the Berwick Academy Centennial Celebration mentioned in the letter.
    A note with this text reads: [Mabel Lowell Burnett].  The linse of hyphens presumably indicate omissions from the manuscript.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Berwick Academy Centennial Celebration:  Richard Cary says: "The centennial celebration of the founding of Berwick Academy, of which Miss Jewett and her sister Mary were alumnae, was to be held on July 1, 189l."

Dr. Peabody:  Andrew Preston Peabody.  See Correspondents.  Dr. Peabody gave the official prayer that opened the celebration's "Exercises in the Church"; see A Memorial of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Berwick Academy, p. 1

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


Tuesday

[ 30 June 1891 ]*

Pinny* Speaked last night !! ~~~~~~~~~~~~

She speaked at a banquet given by the Berwick Scholars and will now make other engagements ~~~~~~~

There were some forty persons present ~~~~~

She sends her love

[ Page 2 ]

as usual ~~~~~~~

    Tomorrow is The Day* and today is the day before. So that I can only have two [ deleted word; and Jewett has inserted and deleted words ]     words with my Fuffatee* -- (Helen Merriman* sent me a phot. of S.W.'s* picture. I mean the

[ Manuscript breaks off.  No signature ]


Notes

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The Day:  Almost certainly Jewett refers to the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of the founding of Berwick Academy, which took place on 1 July 1891.

Fuffatee:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Helen Merriman
: See Correspondents.

S.W.'s little portrait:  Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.  Information about the portrait has not yet been discovered.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Saturday.

 [4 July 1891 ]*


Dear darling Fuff.

    I did make a mistake about the lads!* I thought they were to come yesterday! It is so nice about the Holmes's!* I know exactly how you must feel about it -- though I was sure enough myself -- I never can forget that day of the Authors Reading* when the dear little doctor looked astray and alone and

[ Page 2 ]

then caught sight of you and hurried toward you -- "Heres my dear* Mrs. Fields! " ----said he in an indescribably relieved and touching tone. Do go to see him all you can -- havent I always said that, but I understand that it has been pleasant to get such new reassurance. "These people" do the best they can I'm sure but they must be glad to have real aid in a thing that

[ Page 3 ]

will be perhaps, increasingly difficult & delicate of apprehension. It makes me think of Mrs. Stowe's* saying that she was day nurse to a hummingbird.

    ---- And Fuff such a pretty part, and all "being on the spot" & promises to come again to celebrate Pinny.* It is such a pleasure to keep thinking about.

    I hope now that you

[ Page 4 ]

will have a quet Sunday -- I think such a giddy mousatee must need it.)*

    -- x I had a perfectly delightful evening from old Dr. Lord last night.* I wished for you; he really is so interesting now. [ deleted word ] He was talking about his English experiences at the time he lived there three or four years and married his wife -- He knew Cardinal Wiseman and Archbishop Whately and Carlyle


about whom he talked enchantingly -- it made me feel as if I had gone to the door in Cheyne Row and had "Mrs. Carlyle herself" come to open it, "a beautiful woman with delightful manners," and Carlyle come scolding downstairs (though he had made the appointment himself)*
and grumbling that "Americans were all bores and he liked the Russians; a sober, thinking and acting

[ Page 5 ]

people," and then grow very good-natured and after a while take his company for a long walk -- and cross old Dean Gaisford also appeared with that group of Oxford men --* You could have drawn out much more, but indeed it was very interesting to me. Egotism is the best of a man after eighty. He is ^chiefly^ valuable then for what he has

[ Page 6 ]

been, and for the wealth of his personality, and what is silly ^self-admiration^ at forty is a treasure of remembrance. The stand-point has changed!

     I must say good-bye -- but what savings we shall be telling over pretty soon. Don't forget things to tell your

Pinny --

(It was so nice to think of Twins & Nelly Prince* coming to tea and dear SW* in the evening! -- )


Notes

4 July 1891:  This date is tentative, based upon Dr. John Lord's attendance at the July 1, 1891 celebration of the Berwick Academy Centennial.  I speculate that he stayed in South Berwick during the week following the event, leaving on Thursday 9 July.
   
Fields penciled 1889 in the upper right of page 1At top left she has penciled: "Please turn to the 4th page of this note."

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

lads:  Among the young men Fields might be entertaining at this time is Ellis Dresel. See Louisa Dresel in Correspondents. However, nothing is yet known about the identities of these lads.

Holmes's: Jewett refers to Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.  See Correspondents. It seems likely that Jewett is speaking of provisions for Dr. Holmes's care during the final years of his life.

Authors Reading: Jewett refers to the Author's Reading for the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Memorial, which took place on 31 March 1887.
    In his Sarah Orne Jewett Letters, Richard Cary says that in the winter of 1887, Jewett served a secretary of a committee that arranged an impressive Authors' Reading in the Boston Museum for the purpose of raising a Longfellow Memorial fund (see Lilian W. Aldrich, Crowding Memories [Boston, 1920], 255-262, and Colby Library Quarterly, VII [March 1965], 36, 40-42).

dear:  Jewett underlines this word twice.

Mrs. Stowe's:  Harriet Beecher Stowe. See Correspondents.  If Stowe published her remark about nursing a hummingbird, this has not yet been located.

Pinny:  Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.   See Correspondents.

mousatee* must need it.):  This parenthesis mark and the following x have been penciled in by Fields.  All other parenthesis marks in the letter are in Fields's pencil.
    Mousatee is a variation on "Mouse," one of Jewett's nicknames for Fields. See Correspondents.

Dr. Lord: The Lords were a prominent family in South Berwick. Jewett recounts portions of the family history in "The Old Town of Berwick." 
    Jewett probably is speaking of Professor John Lord (1810 - 15 December 1894) an American historian and lecturer, specializing in history of the ancient world, upon which he published a number of books.  Wikipedia says: "In 1843-46, he was in England giving lectures on the Middle Ages, and on his return to the United States continued to lecture for many years in the principal towns and cities, giving over 6,000 lectures in all. In 1864, he received his LL.D. from the University of the City of New York. From 1866 to 1876, he was lecturer on history at Dartmouth College."  According to Nathan Franklin Carter in The Native Ministry of New Hampshire, Lord's first wife was Mary Porter, whom he married in London on May 30, 1846.  He died at Stamford, CT, where he resided 1855-1894 (640).

Cardinal Wiseman and Archbishop Whately ... Cheyne Row ... Dean Gaisford: Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) and his wife, Jane Welsh, moved from rural Scotland to Cheyne Walk in Chelsea in 1834 after the appearance of Sartor Resartus. There he became known as "the sage of Chelsea." Nicholas Patrick Stephen Wiseman (1802-1863) was a cardinal. Richard Whately (1787-1863) was Archbishop of Dublin. Thomas Gaisford (1779-1855) was Regius Professor of Greek and Dean of Christ Church, Oxford. 

himself: Jewett's handwriting being somewhat unclear at this point, Fields has penciled an "f" at the end of this word to clarify.

Twins & Nelly Prince:  Almost certainly Jewett refers to the sisters, Helen Olcott Choate Bell and Miriam Foster Choate Pratt as the twins. Mrs Pratt's daughter was the novelist, Nelly Prince.  See Correspondents. The Choate sisters were not actually twins.

SW:  Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields Transcription

These passages from letter appear in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 52.

 Saturday

     I had a perfectly delightful evening from old Dr. Lord last night. I wished for you. He really is so interesting now. He was talking about his English experiences at the time he lived there three or four years and married his wife. He knew Cardinal Wiseman and Archbishop Whately, and Carlyle, about whom he talked enchantingly. It made me feel as if I had gone to the door in Cheyne Row and had "Mrs. Carlyle herself" come to open it, "a beautiful woman with delightful manners," and Carlyle come scolding downstairs (though he had made the appointment himself) and grumbling that Americans were all bores and he liked the Russians, a sober, thinking and acting people, and then he would grow very good-natured, and after a while take his company for a long walk; -- cross old Dean Gaisford also appeared with that group of Oxford men. You could have drawn out much more, but indeed it was very interesting to me. Egotism is the best of a man after eighty. He is chiefly valuable then for what he has been, and for the wealth of his personality, and what is silly self-admiration at forty is a treasure of remembrance. The stand-point has changed.

     I must say good-bye, but what savings we shall be telling over pretty soon. Don't forget things.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields
  

Wednesday morning
[ 8 July 1891 ]*

Dear Fuff*

            What a lovely day for us to go to walk along the shore to see Alice* and all!  and to sit down in a warm corner out of the wind among the bayberry bushes.  It is quite wonderful how well this weather makes one feel.  I didn't get sound asleep until five but I feel as brisk as a bee this morning .  Tomorrow Dr. Lord is going away, and I shall miss the old man very much.  He has been very interesting and companionable and lives in books rather than with people.  He was enchanted with the Murray biography,* knowing or having seen ever so many of the men in it . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 
Notes

8 July 1891:  This date is tentative, based upon Dr. John Lord's attendance at the July 1, 1891 celebration of the Berwick Academy Centennial.  I speculate that he stayed in South Berwick during the week following the event, leaving on Thursday 9 July.  It is possible as well that this letter was written on July 1, the morning of the celebration.  That Jewett had an almost sleepless night on June 30 could be explained by her anticipation of the following "big day."  However, this would imply that Dr. Lord ended his South Berwick stay on Thursday 2 July, making it impossible for him to talk with Jewett on Saturday 4 July.  Another possibility is that he arrived in Berwick a week before the celebration and that the talk Jewett reports in her 4 July letter took place on 27 June.
    The ellipsis at the end of the transcription indicates that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff
:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Alice:  Of the two Alices Jewett most likely refers to, Alice Greenwood Howe seems more likely than Alice Longfellow.  Jewett seems to be responding to Annie Fields having walked to the Cliffs to visit Alice Howe.  See Correspondents.

Dr. Lord: Jewett probably is speaking of Professor John Lord (1810 - 15 December 1894) an American historian and lecturer, specializing in history of the ancient world, upon which he published a number of books.  Wikipedia says: "In 1843-46, he was in England giving lectures on the Middle Ages, and on his return to the United States continued to lecture for many years in the principal towns and cities, giving over 6,000 lectures in all. In 1864, he received his LL.D. from the University of the City of New York. From 1866 to 1876, he was lecturer on history at Dartmouth College."  According to Nathan Franklin Carter in The Native Ministry of New Hampshire, Lord's first wife was Mary Porter, whom he married in London on May 30, 1846.  He died at Stamford, CT, where he resided 1855-1894 (640).

the Murray biography:   While it is difficult to be sure which book Jewett refers to, in 1891, one title that would likely have interested both her and Dr. Lord was a biography of John Murray (1741-1815), who was the founder of the Universalist denomination in the United States: The Life of Reverend John Murray (Boston 1891) by Judith Sargent Murray, John Murray, and G. L. Demarest.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Thursday mornng

[ Summer 1891 ]*


Dearest little Fuff*

    I couldn't help clinging to a hope that you would come down for a single night but I do see how hard it would be for you to get away ---- Mary* is coming home tonight after what 'pears to be a very nice time. I am so glad she could be away -- and she couldn't have had a better time.  ^She was having a lovely time being with you.^*

    I cant think of much to tell

[ Page 2 ]

you this morning except of the pleasant weather and the usual goings on in the village. I went over to see old Mrs. Paul at the tavern* after tea and carried her an offering of a variegated pink and white double petunia and we had a beautiful occasion. She is such a nice old woman and getting feeble so that she doesn't do much but sit by her bedroom window and amuse herself by watching the people in the

[ Page 3 ]

street -- Just before tea the new acquaintance whom I call "the Kipling girl" came to make me a call, and I enjoyed her very much -- I laughed so and [ so ? ] did she at one thing -- I ventured the subject of Mr. Rudyard Kipling* again and she said while we were upon it -- "He was such a conceited [ deleted letters ] little upstartish fellow" -- (this was a few years go) "that my sister wouldn't let me come down when he [ called corrected ]

[ Page 4 ]

because she said he would ask me to dance and she wouldn't have her dancing with the little conceited thing. Think of the glor-r-ry it would be to me now!" -- She has such a funny Irish accent and is most entertaining -- I believe that she is going to join the sister [ with corrected ] whom she was at Simla, in Portugal-- & leaves her cousins here today to sail on Saturday -- What a droll person to drift into this small harbor with its prim New England ways!

[ Page 5 ]

I didn't get much work done yesterday here at the desk. Mother was not so well as usual, but she is better again today, and I had to be on deck as S.W.* sometimes says -- I had a dear letter from her last night -- I had to ask about the portrait and how it goes on.  It is terribly sad what you say of Elmwood. I feared it all the other day. I wish you had seen Mabel* --

    How dear about "Sister Lizzie"*

[ Page 6 ]

You must shingle her with little shawls and keep the furnace alight & with dry air in the house she wont get cold, but she has ^got^ pretty well heated by this time of course in Baltimore, & will have to be carefuller than we-uns.  I shall take the first chance I can to go over.

Good-bye my darling, from

Your P.L.*

I think this Salvation army paper* very interesting & well done dont you?

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 1 ]

"Pitsy Pies" -- is Pretty Surprise, the horse !!  Fuff was going to have him for dinner I suppose! They do so much good dont they?


Notes

Summer 1891:  This date is supported by Jewett indicating the final illness of James Russell Lowell.  See notes below.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

with you:  Jewett has inserted this sentence between the final two lines of this page.

Mrs. Paul at the tavern: Sarah F. Johnson (1818-1892), wife of Josiah Paul. They operated the Paul Hotel in South Berwick until their deaths in 1892.

Rudyard Kipling: See Correspondents. The identity of the Kipling girl remains unknown.

S.W.:  Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents. At this time, she may have been at work on a portrait of Oliver Wendell Homes, Sr. This portrait, completed in 1892, is displayed at the Moody Medical Library, University of Texas.

MabelMabel Lowell Burnett, daughter of James Russell Lowell. See Correspondents.  The Lowell residence, in Cambridge, MA was Elmwood.

"Sister Lizzie":  Annie Fields's sister, Elizabeth Adams. See Annie Fields in Correspondents.

Salvation army paper:  This reference remains mysterious.  The Salvation Army appears in a minor way in Rudyard Kipling's story, "A Disturber of Traffic," which appeared in Atlantic in September 1891.  Or perhaps she refers to the Salvation Army publication, All the World.  Or perhaps she sends Fields a recent article on the organization.

P.L.:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Lilian Woodman Aldrich

South Berwick   

2nd of August 1891

My dear Lilian

    I must send you a word tonight -- I have been meaning to write but somehow the summer has slipped away very fast. I wish that I knew where you are* and if you are well and if this is like all the summers in being your best summer.

[ Page 2  ]

(I hope especially that Mr. Pierce* is ever so much stronger and better than he was in the spring. I never shall forget our feast! I believe it must have been a great tonic and quite like a turning point in his case -- not that it was such a serious case but a very good feast. I have been very well ever since !! -- I need not say that I have been here almost all the time after I

[ Page 3  ]

have told you that my mother's sad illness still goes on.* Earlier in the summer she was wonderfully better for a time but now she is very poorly again and suffers a great deal. I have only been able to get to Manchester twice, for a very few days, since Mrs. Fields* went there in June and as she was not a bit well for the first few weeks I was worried enough. I am hoping that if things are going better here she will come over for a day or two this week.  She

[ Page 4  ]

has had guests coming and going as usual and it is very cheerful and gay along the shore but she misses Mrs. Lodge* very much there always, and with Mrs. Howe away this year and Mrs. Bell & Mrs. Pratt,* her own particular little circle seems much broken. Mrs. Whitman* is the best of friends though, and she goes often to see Dr. Holmes* and has been to town rather more than usual about the 'poor folk' {.}*

    I cant think of much news to tell you dear friends, only Berwick news! -- Which you would find rather dull. So I am going to send my letter off without it just to carry

[ Up the left margin and then across the top margin of page 1  ]

you my love and to say how glad I shall be when you come back again. I keep looking for stories in the magazines by T.B.A.* which would seem a little like seeing himself and you.

Yours every affectionately

S. O. J.

Notes

where you are: The Aldriches were in Europe in the summer of 1891, in London in July.

Mr. Pierce: Henry Lille Pierce. See Correspondents. The opening parenthesis at the beginning of this sentence appears to be in another hand.

goes on: Caroline Frances Perry Jewett died 21 October 1891.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

misses Mrs. Lodge: Mary Langdon Greenwood (Mrs. James) Lodge died 21 December 1889. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Howe ... Mrs. Bell & Mrs. Pratt:  Mrs. Howe almost certainly is Julia Ward Howe.  For her as well as for Helen Choate Bell and Eliza Pratt, see Correspondents.

Mrs. Whitman: Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

Dr. Holmes: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. See Correspondents.

'poor folk': Annie Fields worked with Associated Charities of Boston.

T.B.A.:  Thomas Bailey Aldrich. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Bailey Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2740.


 
Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

  July 8, 1891.

      I have wanted awfully to write to you, dear My Fellow Traveller; yet somehow at bad moments couldn't, and at good ones fell to dreaming instead. . . .

     It's been somehow a difficult kind of a time, with one shining spot for which to be everlastingly grateful, thirty-six hours at Niagara! E. L.* asked me long ago to stay with her there, and I did not want to miss all this period of solemn and tender experience with her, so I went just for this, instead of the fortnight.

     When once I saw that supreme sight before I knew it was an altar; and all I had felt came home to me, a thousand fold: and I shall dream forever of the picture which must be painted there. Someday we will speak of it, and of the rainbow which came and "stood round about the throne." With this letter was the following sonnet.

     SURSUM CORDA

      Behold an altar radiantly fair
Lit with white flames drawn from the heart of things!
     Here pour oblations of majestic springs
Fed by the sky in some wide upland air;
     Here rises incense warm with scent of dawn.
Gold with the sunset, purple with the night,
     Here shines a snowy pavement dazzling bright
For saints and little children and the worn
     Footsteps of martyrs who have gained their palm.
O God! of Thee alone this splendor tells.
     In power, in continuity, in calm;
In air ineffable where color dwells,
     Or in still voices where are borne along
Strains of an incommunicable song.

      Niagara, July 2, 1891.


Notes

E. L.: It is likely that this person is Elizabeth Chapman Lawrence (1829-1905), one of Whitman's correspondents.  See E.L., The Bread Box Papers: a biography of Elizabeth Chapman Lawrence, (1983) by Helen H. Gemmill.  She was married to the diplomat, Timothy Bigelow Lawrence (d. 1869).  Her home was the Aldie Mansion in Doylestown, PA.

stood round about the throne: See Revelations 7:11.

Sursum corda: Latin. Upward, hearts!

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Friday night

[ Summer 1891 ]*

My dearest Fuff*

    (I meant to send a message to Miss Hale,* but I sealed up my letter and sent it off before I thought! I do hope that your sister* is going to stay over Sunday at least -- ) How nice that you find something so interesting in the Browning book!* and now I suppose you will take the Laurence Oliphant* -- but it occurs

[ Page 2 ]

to me that Lady Dufferin* and R. Browning and the Oliphants are a [ funny ? ] combination!

    -- ( I send you A. Howe's letter which has nice kind things in it -- I had forgotten that Mrs James Howe and the little boy* are coming home this summer.    This has been another busy day, but ) I got time for a little visit to Miss Grant* this afternoon which I enjoyed very much. It is so touching to see her

[ Page 3 ]

and hear her! When I told her that Mother was comfortable "Oh what a word it is!" she said, in a way that I never can forget. She suffers very much poor thing! -- "It takes every body to know everything!" she said once in quite her brisk old way, and we had a good few minutes together.

    (I believe that I shall go to town tomorrow -- (there is a fast train that leaves here (or Rollinsford) at half past eight, and I can have

[ Page 4 ]

plenty of time and more too before the half past three train or four o'clock).  I may have to go out to the press, it is about some printing &c -- upon which I am casting the light of my wild imagination. How I should like to spend even half an hour with you! but I shall be coming along soon, and staying longer -- Goodnight dear dear Fuff from your Pinny.*

Pinny finded a place in Miss Grant's lane today where 4 leaf clovers were so thick that she picked a bunch and then saw so many more that she was discouraged & she comed away.


Notes

Summer 1891:  Fields penciled 1894 in the upper right of page 1However, it seems more likely that this letter is from 3 years earlier. Jewett probably gave Fields the Lady Dufferin book for her birthday in June of 1891. Though 1892 could be possible, Jewett and Fields were together in Europe that summer. Seen notes below.
    Parenthesis marks in this letter are in green pencil, added by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Miss Hale:  Probably Ellen Day Hale (1854-1940), daughter of Edward Everett Hale. She studied with William Morris Hunt and at the Julian Art School in Paris. Later she established a studio in Boston and became notable for her portraits, landscapes, and genre paintings.

your sister:  Fields had three sisters, but the one most likely to make an extended visit at this time would be the painter Elizabeth (Lissie) Adams (1825-1898), who resided in Baltimore, MD.  See Correspondents.

Browning book: In the period from 1888 to 1891, a large number of books about Robert Browning appeared. Perhaps of special interest to Fields and Jewett in 1891 would have been Life and Letters of Robert Browning (1891) by Sutherland Orr and Browning's Message to his Time (1891) by Edward Berdoe.

Laurence Oliphant: Laurence Oliphant (1829 - 1888) was a British author, diplomat and Christian mystic. He lived many of his later years in Palestine.  To which book of his Jewett refers is not evident; his last book was Scientific Religion (1888).

Lady Dufferin: Our Viceregal Life in India (1889), by Hariot Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, Marchioness of Dufferin (1843-1936).  A letter of 2 June 1891 contains Jewett's request that the Lady Dufferin book be delivered to Annie Fields.

A. Howe's ... Mrs James Howe ... little boy: Alice Greenwood Howe. See Correspondents.
    Though George Dudley Howe had a brother, James, he died in infancy. A Dr. James Sullivan Howe (1858-1914), residing in nearby Brookline, MA, married Annie Louisa Bigelow, and they had two children: Fanny (b. 1884) and James Sullivan, Jr. (b. 1886).  The latter would have been a little boy in 1894. Whether or how he was related to George Dudley Howe remains unknown, and so we cannot be sure that Annie Louisa Howe is the Mrs. James Howe Jewett mentions.

Miss Grant: Olive Grant. See Correspondents.

Pinny: Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Sunday night

[ 2 August 1891 ]*


Dearest Fuff

    I have been trying to get on my foreign letters today for I picked out a big pile of them from among the directed envelopes and I have nobly finished eight out of the twelve that really ought to be done. There being other funerals that I could go to! but these were heavy on my conscience -- like* letters to Jessie and Katie Bradbury & A. Howe and Loulie* to whom I hadn't written at all and

[ Page 2 ]

the other day such a long and friendly one came! I kept my letters up pretty well all the early part of the summer but now I seem to be getting far behind. I don't know when I had written to Jess! -- It has turned out to be quite for the best about your not being able to come for Cousin Alice Gilman* must come tomorrow and I only hope that mother will be equal to taking some little pleasure* -- She has been brighter this evening than for two or three days and

[ Page 3 ]

more like herself but she has seemed so ill and dull, and could hardly move herself about at all. Tonight I noticed that she seemed much stronger and better -- )

    I thought of you at the little service at Mrs. Morse's* that morning. I remember it so well last year, and how pleasant is was going over.

    When I see you you must tell me about it. Thank you for the notes -- indeed I do like to have them dear Fuff -- and to know about everything. I find that I am going to be glad to

[ Page 4 ]

have Bill* come back, but I will say that the present [ incumbent corrected ] was to my mind a noble maker of puddings and we may never see her like again in that respect. There be Fuffatees that will presently enjoy little rice puddings that are too rich for such as Pinny, but it takes all sorts of folks to make the world! -- I wish  at this moment that I could remember Miss Grants* form of speech by which she expresses that noble thought -- it is so quaint and funny.

    ( Did you tell poor little Katharine Foote* that my Wide Awake story is true? It isnt

[ Page 5 ]

except the fact of my having having the little chair* -- I made up every bit of the story about it because I thought the dear thing ought to have a story! It belonged to my grandmother but I think it may have been her grandmothers before her! it has always been here in the house and nobody knows any more about it -- but I love it a good deal.  Good night dear darling because I am going to bed,* (after I go down stairs to remind Annie of Mothers lemonade and perhaps have a word with Mary* who is reading

[ Page 6 ]

in the library -- ( Next Monday a week is her time for going to the Aunts at Little Boar's Head* and I do hope that she can get off. She reallys gets more tired and nervous and needs changes more than I do -- and I must keep it in mind more than ever, but if you cant slip over here I will try every way to have a night or two in Manchester -- I do not want you to come so very much.

    It was lovely of you to send Stubby* the book dear -- I secreted it with pride and it will be such a pleasure. How did you remember it was his birthday I wonder? I got a little new book about birds -- and Tuesday is the day --

Goodnight darling Fuff from your P.L. )



Notes

2 August 1891
:  Fields penciled "1891 August" in the upper right of page 1.   This date is confirmed by other information in the notes below. Presumably, Jewett composed the letter the Sunday before her nephew's birthday on 4 August.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.  Fields has penciled in a semicolon after "Dearest" and deleted "Fuff."

like: Fields has penciled several marks before "like" that appear to be a double open parenthesis.

Jessie ...Katie Bradbury ... A. Howe ... Loulie: In Correspondents see Jessie Cochrane, Kate Bradbury, Alice Greenwood Howe, and Louisa Dresel.

Alice Gilman: Alice Dunlap Gilman. See Correspondents.

little pleasure:  Jewett's mother, Caroline Jewett, died on 21 October 1891.

Mrs. Morse's: It seems likely that this is Harriet Jackson Lee (Mrs. Samuel Tapley) Morse.  See Frances Morse in Correspondents. Possibly Jewett refers to the death of Samuel T. Morse, which occurred on 6 November 1890, something less than a year before.

better -- ):  This parenthesis mark like the others in this letter was penciled in by Fields.  She also has penciled in "begin." after this mark.

have Bill:  Between these two words, Fields has inserted in pencil "you with."
    The identity of Bill is not known, but she appears to have been a cook in either the Jewett or the Fields household.

Grants:  Olive Grant. See Correspondents.

poor little Katharine Foote:  Fields has deleted this phrase and penciled an insertion "some one."
    Kate Grant Knowlton Foote. See Correspondents.

little chair: Jewett's "Peg's Little Chair" appeared in Wide Awake (33:204-214), August 1891.

to bed:  Fields has penciled in an insertion: "your P.L." for Pinny Lawson, a Jewett nickname.

Annie ... Mary:  Annie Collins and Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Aunts at Little Boar's Head: One of Jewett's aunts, Helen (Mrs. Charles) Bell had a summer home, "The Cove," at Little Boar's Head in North Hampton, NH. See Correspondents.

Stubby:  Theodore Jewett Eastman, whose birthday was 4 August. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


 
SOJ to Mary Lanman Ferris

     South Berwick, Maine

     August 8, 1891

     Dear Mrs. Ferris:

      You will find in my volume of stories for children, called Play Days, some verses -- "Discontent"1 -- which have been used sometimes for a like collection* to your own.2
 
     There are some other slight verses in the earlier volumes of St. Nicholas, one which I remember just now about four-leaved clovers.3 Perhaps you mean to use prose selections and these you will find, beside the Play Days stories, a number of others in St. Nicholas and Wide Awake.4
 
     But of course you will have to speak with the publishers about these as my permission alone will not be enough. Messrs. Houghton Mifflin & Co. have always been willing to allow the use of "Discontent," but I don't know what they would decide about the sketches.

     Believe me, with thanks,

     Yours sincerely,

     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes
 
     1 Appeared originally in St. Nicholas, III (February 1876), 247; collected in Play Days and in Verses; quoted in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 11th ed., 1938.
     2 In Grace Townsend (editor), The Youth's Companion at Home and School (Chicago, 1891), 73-74.
     3 "Perseverance," St. Nicholas, X (September 1883), 840-841; collected in Verses as "A Four-Leaved Clover."
     4Wide Awake, edited at this time by Ella Farman Pratt and Charles Stuart Pratt, was a juvenile journal that catered to the same audience as St. Nicholas. Miss Jewett had contributed half a dozen short stories and one poem to it.

Editor's Notes

collection:  Cary writes about this letter: "Mrs. Ferris published a number of uncopyrighted brochures of juvenile rhymes and stories, but it is uncertain whether the project discussed in this letter came to fruition."

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Additional notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



James Russell Lowell to Constable, Jewett's London Publisher

[ July 1891 ]*

    I am very glad to hear that Miss Jewett's delightful stories* are to be reprinted in England. Nothing more pleasingly characteristic of rural life in New England has been written, and they have long been valued by the judicious here. They are probably idylls in prose and the life they commemorate is as simple in its main elements, if not so picturesque in its setting, as that which has survived for us in Theocritus.

     Miss Jewett has wisely chosen to work within narrow limitations, but these are such only as are implied in an artistic nature and a cheerful compliance with it. She has thus learned a discreet use of her material and to fill the space allotted without overcrowding it either with scenery or figures. Her work is narrow in compass, like that of the gem-cutter, but there is always room for artistic completeness and breadth of treatment which are what she aims at and attains. She is lenient in landscape, a great merit, I think, in these days. Above all she is discreet in dialect, using it for flavor but not, as is the wont of many, so oppressively as to suggest garlic. She has a gift of quiet pathos and its correlative, equally subdued humor.

     I remember once, at a dinner of the Royal Academy, wishing there might be a toast in honor of the Little Masters such as Tenniel, Du Maurier, and their fellows. The tiny woodcuts traced by those who gave rise to the name attract an affectionate partiality which the spacious compositions of more famous contemporaries fail to win. They are artists in the best sense, who could make small means suffice for great ends. It is with them that I should class Miss Jewett, since she both possesses and practises this precious art.

Notes

July 1891:  Mathiessen says that Jewett believed this letter was one of the last things Lowell wrote before his death in August 1891.

delightful storiesThe 1891 date indicates that Russell is speaking of Tales of New England (1890).

The manuscript of this letter has not been located.  Francis Otto Matthiessen presents a transcription in his biography, Sarah Orne Jewett, 1929.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


Wednesday night

29 July 1891 ]*

Dearest Dear Fuff --*

    This dear letter from Mr. Lowell!* It made my heart ache too, but I have talked over that side of it so many times that I wont do any thing but say my pleasure.  I wish that we could read it together --

    (I was so sorry that I forgot to carry your letter

[ Page 2 ]

down to the hall table to be posted -- It was conference day and I hadn't seen you since noon of yesterday and poor Fuffatee to find no word from Pinny* and to [ deleted word think ? ] miss seeing Nelly Arnold's* letter & all until morning!

    We were in a little scurry and uncertainty this morning early about getting off, for the morning was so cold and windy -- but we did

[ Page 3 ]

drive away about half past eight toward Rochester and had a great deal of pleasure out of the day. I found a new bit of old road on our roundabout way home and I am going to hie me there again to take some pretty photographs. There was one lovely place a little old house by a brook about six miles from here ) --

    Thursday morning. I have

[ Page 4 ]

waked to a day of great emprise -- the parlor is a-cleaning and all the books and candlesticks and chiny images of one sort and another, but idols all, are on the highway of the hall. I have my duties, and I feel as slow and sleepy as my favorite hopper-toad!

    I have been writing to Mr. Lowell and oh how I wish that it were a good letter with the right words --

[ heavily deleted line ]

    (I shall write to Mabel* soon and I can tell her better than I can tell him how I feel about it! It is

[ Page 5 ]

a lovely bright day as ever was, and I am full of business as can be.

    I think that this is such a charming bit of writing of Mr. Lowells -- it has such form and perfection and all that about the Little Masters* is so lovely --

    (I wish I knew where to ask Mr Lowell ^Osgood^* to put it. I wonder if Mr. Lowell sees the Spectator or the Academy.  No, perhaps it is the Athenæum. I can ask Mabel -- for I really cannot help writing her in a day or two.

    ( Dear Fuff I had such a dear and delightful letter from you of which I have not spoken. How charming all that was about Mr. Winthrop,* and how we will talk more about it next week.

Your Pinny -- )

was the [ booting or footing ] right?*


Notes

  29 July 1891:  As indicated in the notes below, this letter almost certainly was composed shortly before the death of James Russell Lowell on 12 August 1891. Wednesday 29 July is a likely date, but not certain.
    Parenthesis marks in this manuscript almost certainly are by Fields.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mr. Lowell: James Russell Lowell (1819 - 12 August 1891). See Correspondents. And see below regarding the letter.

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson (Pinny / Pin) was an affectionate nickname for Jewett, used by her and Annie Fields. See Correspondents.

Nelly Arnold: Eleanore Mary Caroline Arnold (1861-1936), was a daughter of British poet and cultural critic, Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 - 15 April 1888). She married Armine Wodehouse in 1889, and remarried after his death, in 1909. That Jewett calls her "Nelly Arnold" does not guarantee that she was not yet married when this letter was composed, as Jewett sometimes continues to call women by their "maiden names" after they marry.

Mabel: Mabel Lowell Burnett, daughter of James Russell Lowell. See Correspondents.

Little Masters: It seems likely that Jewett refers to the letter James Russell Lowell to Constable of Summer 1891, composed shortly before his death in 1891. In that letter, he says "I remember once, at a dinner of the Royal Academy, wishing there might be a toast in honor of the Little Masters such as Tenniel, Du Maurier, and their fellows." He goes on to compare Jewett to these artists.

Osgood:  James Ripley Osgood. See Correspondents.
    It is not perfectly clear whether this deletion and insertion are by Jewett or by Fields.

Spectator ... Academy ... Athenæum: Contemporary literary magazines. Jewett seems persuaded that this letter should be published, but apparently it was not.

Mr. Winthrop: This may be Robert C. Winthrop, Jr. (1834-1905), lawyer and author with an interest in history.

right:  This note appears at the bottom right corner of the page and has been circled, either by Jewett or by Fields.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Death of James  Russell Lowell
August 12, 1891
Close friend of Jewett and Annie Fields.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Wednesday night.

[ August 12,1891 ]*
  

Oh what sad news from Elmwood, dear Fuff! It makes me so heavy-hearted to think of our loss of such a dear friend and of poor Mabel's sorrow --* What must not this long hot, bright day have been to her [ ! corrected from ?]  I don't know of any one who could feel such sorrow more keenly. I think and think of her and so must you I am sure, and how we should

[ Page 2 ]

talk about dear Mr. Lowell if we were together. Here he is only the 'Lowell' of his books, to people, and not a single one knows how dear and charming he was and how full of helps to one's thoughts and purposes in every day life. I wrote to Mabel most truly that I was as fond of him almost as if I belonged to his household and kindred. And

[ Page 3 ]

 I suppose that the last bit of writing for print that he may have done was that letter for me.* I have been looking over two or three of his letters or notes to me which I happen to have here with such affection and pleasure. How you will like to look over your great package! And how I treasure that last time I saw him and the fringe tree in bloom and Mabel gone to Petersham* and he and I talking on and

[ Page 4 ]

on, and I thinking he was really going to be better in spite of the look about his face -- I suppose you will go up to the funeral, you must remember what people say and every little thing that we should care about together to tell me.

     -- And yet I say to myself, again and again how glad I am that the long illness is ended --

    (Poor Mr. Norton,* how saddened he will be! It seems as if he stood nearest Mr. Lowell next)

[ Manuscript breaks off. ]


Notes


August
12,1891
:  Fields penciled 1891 in the upper right of page 1 and she has also penciled the note: "date of Lowell's death." James Russell Lowell died 12 August 1891. See Correspondents.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

sad news from Elmwood ... Mabel's sorrow: American poet and critic, James Russell Lowell died on August 12, 1891. His daughter Mabel Lowell Burnett (1847-1898), was his only surviving child. Elmwood was Lowell's home in Cambridge, Massachusetts. See Correspondents.

fringe tree in bloom ... Petersham: The Fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, has fragrant white flowers. Petersham is in north central Massachusetts.

that letter for me:  "Reading for Young Women," with letters from Jewett and Lowell appeared in Chicago Weekly News, December 3, 1891.  The piece says "An association of literary young ladies in a western city recently deputed one of their number to write to their favorite authors in both hemispheres, requesting them to favor her with some words of wise counsel and advice by which she and her associates might profit."  Jewett suggests here that she obtained the letter from Lowell that was included in the piece and, therefore, that she was more than simply one of the contributors.  Perhaps she even was the "one of their number," though she was not resident in a "western city."
    Lowell's letter in the piece was titled "A Voice from the Grave" and was dated "ELMWOOD, CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 30, 1891."

(Poor Mr. Norton:  Author and Harvard professor, Charles Eliot Norton.  See Elizabeth, Grace and Sara Norton in Correspondents.
    The parenthesis marks around this passage were penciled by Fields.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Annie Fields transcription

This passage appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911), p. 85.

     Wednesday night, August 12,1891.  

     What sad news from Elmwood, dear! It makes me so heavy-hearted to think of our loss of such a dear friend, and of poor Mabel's sorrow. What must not this lovely hot, bright day have been to her! I don't know of any one who could feel such sorrow more keenly. I think and think of her, and so must you, I am sure, and how we should talk about dear Mr. Lowell if we were together. Here he is only the "Lowell" of his books, to people, and not a single one knows how dear and charming he was, and how full of help to one's thoughts and purposes in every-day life. I wrote to Mabel most truly that I was as fond of him, almost, as if I belonged to his household and kindred. And I suppose that the last bit of writing for print that he may have done was that letter for me. I have been looking over two or three of his letters or notes to me, which I happen to have here, with such affection and pleasure. How you will like to look over your great package! And how I treasure that last time I saw him, and the fringe tree in bloom, and Mabel gone to Petersham, and he and I talking on and on, and I thinking he was really going to be better, in spite of the look about his face! I suppose you will go up to the funeral; you must remember what people say, and every little thing that we should care about together, to tell me. And yet I say to myself, again and again, how glad I am that the long illness is ended.



SOJ to Miss Pettes

South Berwick Maine
31 August 1891

Dear Mifs Pettes*

    I am going to ask the Photogravure Company to make another plate from the photograph* which I enclose.  There was something wrong in the printing of the other{--} it is not true on the card and I dont like it.  Will

[ Page 2 ]

you kindly send me the bill however ^& the plate^ as it was my carelessness in not looking after the matter better.  I remember that there was something wrong about one or two of ^in^ the last 'order' of those photographs and that I meant to throw them away.

    Will you please have great care

[ Page 3 ]

of this photo, which I need now as it belongs to my sister and I have abstracted it from a frame and dread discovery!  Please ask the workmen to be very careful.  I believe it is all the one there is --

    And when the plate is made will you have have fifty copies made in the size of the ^(paper)^

[ Page 4 ]

proof you send and fifty others on paper about half the size so that I can put them into my story books sometimes?  Then I think that I shall have got the "likeness" question off my mind once and for all!

    I cant tell you how much I thank you for the kindness and friendliness of your note.

Yours sincerely

Sarah O. Jewett



Notes

Pettes: The envelope associated with this letter is cancelled on 31 August 1891, addressed to Mifs [so spelled] Pettes, Boston Photogravure Company, 132 Boylston St. Boston
    The Boston Photogravure Company was a fine-art publishing company, in addition to reproducing individual photographs.
    The identity of Miss Pettes is unknown.  There was a Helen F. Pettes (c. 1861- after 1940), however, who from November 1899 to July 1905, was an assistant in charge of photographs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

photograph:  Jewett had several portrait photos made in her lifetime,  Which one she has sent here has not yet been determined. 

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Miss Pettes

South Berwick Maine
  7 September [1891]

Dear Mifs Pettes*

    I do like the second plate best!  I quite recognize the fact [unrecognized word] that I have given a great deal of what must have seemed unnecessary trouble and I hope that it will be properly considered in

[ Page 2 ]

my bill from the Boston Photogravure company!  I should like to have fifty copies printed on the same ^sized^ paper as these proofs -- 6 3/8 by 8 1/2 and fifty on smaller paper 4 1/2 by 7{,} And I send you a small photograph which I should like to have you try to get a plate from -- enlarged

[ Page 3 ]

somewhat if that will be possible & easier.

    With thanks and best regards

Yours sincerely

S. O. Jewett

Notes

Pettes: The envelope associated with this letter is cancelled on 7 September addressed to  Boston Photogravure Company, Mifs [so spelled] Pettes, 132 Boylston St. Boston
    The Boston Photogravure Company was a fine-art publishing company, in addition to reproducing individual photographs and plates.  It is not known which photographs Jewett is having reproduced, though she offers clues about the second one: see letter to Pettes of 21 September.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  There is a page following this letter on the microfilm copy with an ink-blot and "Please excuse!"  It is not perfectly clear whether that belongs with this letter or with the next one Jewett wrote to Pettes, 21 September.
    Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Horace Scudder

     South Berwick, Maine
     September 9, 1891

    Dear Mr. Scudder:

     I thank you for your letter, and promise as far as the business part is concerned to keep the story in mind.

     We had heard of Mrs. Scudder's mother's death by way of our friends in North Hampton1 and I was sorry for you both in such a change and loss as must have fallen upon you. My mother's weary illness still goes on. I hoped that the bright autumn weather would do her good, but she has been very ill and uncomfortable of late, I am sorry to say.

     It is pleasant to hear of your life at Chocorua!2
 
     Yours sincerely,

     S. O. Jewett

     Please remember me very kindly to Mrs. Scudder and Sylvia.3


Notes

     1 The family of Miss Jewett's mother resided throughout this southern sector of New Hampshire, including Exeter, Rye, and Little Boar's Head.
     2 A small community of summer homes in the White Mountains of New Hampshire populated in the latter half of the nineteenth century largely by persons of literary or artistic prominence: painters Benjamin Champney and J. F. Kensett, philosophers William James and William E. Hocking, poets William Vaughn Moody and Edwin Arlington Robinson, editors Horace E. Scudder and Ferris Greenslet, educators Abraham Flexner, Francis J. Child, George F. Baker. Henry James and William Dean Howells came often to stay with William James, and Whittier and Lucy Larcom vacationed in nearby Ossipee. Miss Jewett used to visit the Reverend Treadwell Walden, rector of the Episcopal Cathedral in Boston, at his cottage in Wonalancet.
     3 Scudder's daughter, later Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch of Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



John Greenleaf Whittier to SOJ

Oak Knoll       

Sept 16, 1891

My dear Friend

A great many thanks for thy welcome letter!  It seems a very {long} time since I have seen thee.  Dear Annie Fields* called on us at Newburyport on her way to South

[ Page 2 ]

Berwick.  As she was to stop at the forlorn Junction,* I feared she would find no conveyance and be obliged to walk in the hot sun.  I was glad to see {her} looking so well and bright.  I knew thee would feel the death of Lowell.*  He was an admirer

[ Page 3 ]

and good friend of thine.  His death is a great loss to us all.  It leaves Dr. Holmes* & myself quite alone.  The Dr. came to see me last week, and we had a pleasant hour together.  He feels the death of Lowell but is still his old self, bright and cheerful.  He has written

[ Page 4 ]

a poem on Lowell which will appear in the Atlantic.* 

    The story thee spoke of sending me I suppose went to Newburyport.  I have been here two weeks and I have missed it, much to my regret, for reading what thee write is next best to seeing thee.  With a great deal of love, ever thy old friend

John G Whittler

Notes

Annie Fields.   Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

forlorn Junction:  In traveling between Newburyport and South Berwick, it appears that train passengers often found themselves enduring long waits for connecting trolleys in a "Car Barn" along the route.  See SOJ to William Dean Howells, May - June 1905.  This may be the junction to which Whittier refers.

death of Lowell:  James Russell Lowell died 12 August 1891.  Whittier died 7 September 1892. See Correspondents.

Dr. Holmes: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. died 7 October 1894. See Correspondents.

poem on Lowell ... Atlantic:  Holmes's tribute poem, "James Russell Lowell. 1819-1891," appeared in Atlantic Monthly 68 (October 1891), pp. 552-3.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the South Berwick Public Library, South Berwick, ME.   Transcription by John Richardson.  Annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

Wednesday 16 September

[ 1891 ]*

Dearest Fuff

    (Here is a little creatur' for your poor aching face -- you put the brown side next your [ tooth ? ] -- but I think you know the remedy of old -- I do hope that you are better today -- Perhaps half of this at a time will do, for it looks pretty big -- )

    (What a lovely letter from they friend!* and a nice letter from Mrs. Gardner* and a kind of a droll one from Mrs.

[ Page 2 ]

Vedder and a charming letter from Lady Lyttelton -- I do so hope that you will see her when you go to London again. I feel as if you would be such good friends.  Have you written yet to Mrs. Dugdale?* you know that you meant to and Pinny* she teased ! -----

    Uncle Will* spent yesterday here and left comfort behind him as usual -- but he was much shocked because Mother had failed so fast since he saw her last.  I think that she was

[ Page 3 ]

looking very badly because what she has had to take lately for the swelling in her hand and feet has weakened her dreadfully, but he gave her a new medicine to strengthen her and she is already much better for the two or three doses that she has taken --  I pitied poor Uncle Will so yesterday! I think that he didn't feel very well himself and he knows so well about this hopeless kind of illness, and he and Mother are so fond of each other that it is peculiarly

[ Page 4 ]

hard when she looks to him for the help that he cant give. But Mary* is going to write him how much better she feels for the medicine.)

    A long visit from Dr Lord* last night in his most entertaining state of mind -- and interesting talk about an old group in Manchester* to which he belonged years ago -- Mr Ireland{,} Mr. Pollok -- a certain Mr. Peacock -- the Cowden-Clarkes and others -- and Mr. Bennoch and Mr Bennett straying into the

[ Page 5 ]

conversation from unexpected corners. It was very funny to hear about them from him somehow! and then we were gently led to Edinburgh & heard much that was diverting -- but I think he forgets for the most part what people said & did to him so long ago -- their figures come out clear in his memory evidently as from magic lantern slides and then pass along into shadow.  Once in a while when he feels very

[ Page 6 ]

well and bright he tells me delightful things -- and then if I wish to hear them over again -- I dont!

    I forgot to tell you that the other morning I went stravaging [ so it appears ] in that pretty place by the river which is called the vineyard*and found it so dry that I got to one or two places across the bogs where I haven't been since I was a child -- and I found the most [ superior ? ] hop-hornbeam tree* that you ever saw!

[ Page 7 ]

a noble great fellow -- oddly enough I never saw one here until two or three weeks ago when in driving I caught sight of a little one, and here is this for a second. I mean to try to show it to you sometime -- but it is a rough little piece of country -- full of brooks and little deep swampy places - though I can manage by being roundabout in my course to get you to the tree, I feel pretty sure --     with your two rubbers on your feets -- (Did
[ Page 8 ]

S.W.* like her flowers? -- but what a lovely visit you had from little Smithy* -- she must have been enchanted herself.

Goodby dear darling

from Pinny)




Notes

1891
: Fields penciled 1891 in the upper right of page 1 after Jewett's date. This dating is supported by Jewett's report of her mother's decline. Mrs. Jewett died in October of 1891.  Furthermore, Dr. John Lord is known to have visited the Jewetts in South Berwick during the summer of 1891, notably for the July celebration of the Berwick Academy Centennial.

Fuff:  Nickname for Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.
    Parenthesis marks in this letter have been penciled in by Fields.

thy friend: John Greenleaf Whittier. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Gardner ... Mrs. Vedder ... Lady Lyttelton: For Isabella Stewart Gardner, See Correspondents.
    Mrs. Vedder's identity is uncertain.  There is evidence that Jewett and Fields were acquainted with the painter Elihu Vedder (1836-1923) and his wife, Caroline Rosekrans Vedder (1846-1909).
    Probably, this is Sybella Harriet Clive, Lady Lyttelton (1836-1900), the second wife of George Lyttelton, 4th Baron Lyttelton (1817-1876), a British politician in the House of Lords. Mrs. Lyttelton became a friend and correspondent of a friend of Jewett and Fields, the American poet James Russell Lowell (1819- 12 August 1891). See Portrait of a Friendship: Drawn from New Letters of James Russell Lowell to Sybella Lady Lyttelton, 1881-1891 (1990) by Michael Russell.

Mrs Dugdale: Alice Frances Trevelyan (1843-1902) was the wife of William Stratford Dugdale (1828-1882), who died heroically attempting to rescue miners after a British mine explosion.  He was a beloved pupil of Benjamin Jowett at Oxford, who maintained a friendship with Mrs. Dugdale after her husband's death.  See The Life and Letters of Benjamin Jowett (1897).

Pinny:  Nickname for Jewett. See Correspondents.

Uncle Will:  Dr. William G. Perry (1823-1910), husband of Lucretia Fisk Perry. See Correspondents.

Mary: Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

Dr Lord:  Professor John Lord (1810 - 15 December 1894) an American historian and lecturer, specializing in history of the ancient world, upon which he published a number of books.  Wikipedia says: "In 1843-46, he was in England giving lectures on the Middle Ages, and on his return to the United States continued to lecture for many years in the principal towns and cities, giving over 6,000 lectures in all. In 1864, he received his LL.D. from the University of the City of New York. From 1866 to 1876, he was lecturer on history at Dartmouth College." 

Manchester:  Fields has inserted in pencil after this word: England.

Mr Ireland ... Mr. Pollok...Mr. Peacock -- the Cowden-Clarkes and others -- and Mr. Bennoch and Mr Bennett:
    The Cowden-Clarkes almost certainly are Mary Victoria (Novello) Cowden Clarke (1809-1898), British author, Shakespeare scholar, and her husband Charles, who were friends of Annie Fields.
    The identities of the rest of these persons is uncertain. 
    It is likely that Mr. Bennoch is Francis Bennoch, a London silk merchant who was a friend of the Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) family when the American author was ambassador to Great Britain.
    It seems likely that Mr. Ireland is Scottish journalist, Alexander Ireland (1810-1894).
    It also seems likely that Mr. Pollok is David Pollok (1795-1864), author of a biography of his brother, the Scottish poet, Robert Pollok (1796-1827)
    Mr. Peacock could be Thomas Love Peacock (1785-1866), English author and friend of the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley.
    English music critic and librettist, Joseph Bennett (1831-1911), was a collaborator with Mary Cowden Clarke, and could be the Mr. Bennett Dr. Lord speaks of, though he would have been in his teens at the time Lord resided in England.

vineyard: Jewett describes the "vineyard" in her essay, "The Old Town of Berwick" New England Magazine 16 (July 1894): 585-609).  She writes: "In August the water brink is gay with cardinal flowers. Everything seems to grow in the Vineyard, and to bloom brighter than elsewhere. As an old friend once told me, "If you want six herbs, you can go right there and find them." The shyest and rarest birds of the region may be seen there, in secret haunts, or at the time of their migration; it seems like Nature's own garden and pleasure ground. The old turf is like velvet, even on the high banks; and here grow great barberry-bushes, as they grow almost nowhere else."

hop-hornbeam tree: A deciduous tree in the birch family relatively common in the northern hemisphere.

S.W.:  Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

Smithy:  This person is mentioned in several letters between Jewett and Fields, and so far there are few clues to her identity.  One wonders whether she might be American classical scholar, Emily James Smith Putnam (1865-1944).  Though there is no evidence that she and Annie Fields were acquainted, they shared interest in classical Greek studies.  In 1891, Smith was not yet married, and she was teaching Greek in Brooklyn. In 1899, she married a Jewett correspondent, the publisher George Haven Putnam. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. Annie Fields (Adams) 1834-1915, recipient. 194 letters; 1877-1909 & [n.d.] Sarah Orne Jewett correspondence, 1861-1930. MS Am 1743 (255). Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Miss Pettes

South Berwick Maine
  21 September [1891]

Dear Mifs Pettes*

    I like the proofs very much: will you please have fifty copies struck off?  I have somewhere in my Kodak -- another photograph with the leaves on the trees which I shall send you by and by for I think that it will be

[ Page 2 ]

prettier than this winterish one.*

With many thanks, and best regards to Mr. Millet*


Yours sincerely

S. O. Jewett

Notes

Pettes: The envelope associated with this letter is cancelled on 21 September addressed to  Boston Photogravure Co., -- Mifs --[so spelled] Pettes, 132 Boylston St. Boston
    The Boston Photogravure Company was a fine-art publishing company, in addition to reproducing individual photographs and plates.  It is not known which photographs Jewett is having reproduced.  See letter to Pettes of 31 August.  However, this letter offers the clue the final two she mentions are outdoor scenes.

Kodak:  According to Kodak corporate history, in 1888 the company placed on the market the first snap-shot camera. It took until 1889 to offer transparent film and until 1890 to offer daylight loading film.

Mr. Millet:  The identity of this person remains unknown.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



John Greenleaf Whittier to SOJ



Oak. Knoll

Sept 23 1891

My dear friend

    Miss Freeman* who has just called here tells me that thy dear mother* is very ill.  I am so sorry to hear of it.  I know how thee and thy sister* must feel & and the sad

[ Page 2 ]
 
hopeless waiting for the inevitable. I know what it is.

    One night Mr Phillips* told me he lunched at Manchester and that Mrs Fields* {was} a guest and looking well.  I have had a lovely letter from the dear woman, whom we both know how to prize.


[ Page 3 ]

    I write just to express my deep sympathy, and love.

Ever affectionately thy friend

John G. Whittier


Notes

Miss Freeman:  This person has not been identified.  There is some possibility that Whittier refers to his close friend Alice Freeman Palmer (1855-1902), but she had married in 1887, and she was no longer Miss Freeman at the time of this letter.

dear mother
: Caroline Frances Perry died 21 October 1891. See Correspondents.

thy sister:  Probably Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mr Phillips: This person has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Mrs. Fields.   Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the South Berwick Public Library, South Berwick, ME.   Transcription by John Richardson.  Annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

October, 1891.

     I have come here from Trinity where the Consecration Service* made a great and moving and uplifting period; a wonderful beauty lay in it all; centering in Mr. Brooks and communicating itself to all beholders.
     It is a great office this of Bishop; but its greatness only really becomes apparent when it is filled by a great man, and so there comes in now a strange new recognition of all that may come out of this new splendor. . . .
     I have not seen A. F.* nor indeed any one, since my three days in Williamstown, the most charming town set in the midst of the most genial and beneficent landscape I have ever seen in America.


Notes

Consecration Service: Phillips Brooks was elected Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Massachusetts in 1891.

A. F.: Annie Fields (1834-1915), close mutual friend of Jewett and Whitman, a correspondent with both.

Williamstown: This northwestern Massachusetts town is the home of Williams College (Founded 1791).

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



SOJ to Edwin W. Morse


    
South Berwick, Maine
     October 6, 1891
     To the Editor of The Book Buyer

     My dear Sir:

     I thank you for your very kind note, but I am sorry to say that it will be impossible for me to promise to do even so short and pleasant a bit of work as the notice of Mrs. Jackson's book.1
 
     May I take the liberty to suggest that you ask Miss Sarah C. (Susan Coolidge) Woolsey2 (93 Rhode Island Avenue, Newport) in my place? She has been so closely associated with Mrs. Jackson and her works and ways* that I think she would write the notice charmingly.3
 
     Yours very truly,

     Sarah O. Jewett


Cary's Notes

     1 Helen Hunt Jackson (1830-1885) was noted for her poetry and philanthropy as well as for her novel Ramona. Miss Jewett is referring to her A Calendar of Sonnets, published posthumously by Roberts Brothers in Boston, 1891.
     2 Sarah Chauncey Woolsey (1835-1905) used the pen name "Susan Coolidge," attaining most of her fame through the juvenile What Katy Did stories. She made her home in Newport, Rhode Island, as did Mrs. Jackson for a time, and they traveled to California in 1872. Miss Jewett and Mrs. Fields visited Miss Woolsey annually at her Newport home, Liberty Hall, and all three attended the Chicago World's Fair together in 1893.
     3 The Susan Coolidge review of Mrs. Jackson's A Calendar of Sonnets appeared in The Book Buyer Christmas Annual of December 1891.

Additional Notes

works and ways:  In her letters, Jewett several times repeats this phrase, sometimes within quotation marks.  The actual phrase does not appear, as one might expect, in the King James Bible, though it is suggested in several places: Psalms 145:17, Daniel 4:37, and Revelations 15:3.  In each of these passages, the biblical author refers to the works and ways of God.  Jewett may be quoting from another source or from commentary on these passages, which tend to emphasize that while God's ways are mysterious, they also are to be accepted humbly by humanity.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



Louisa Dresel to SOJ

Oct. 12. [1891]*
Beverly, Mass.


    My dear S.O.J.

        This is to certify that my foot is on my native heath.  Where is yours?

        Some days since in Manchester, I know, but that was while we were still at Pepperell.*  If the weather were not so frigid I should venture down the coast on a voyage of discovery, on the chance of still finding you and Mrs. Fields* on your windy hill-top.

[ Page 2 ]

but there have been such gales the past day or two that I fear I should be blown out of my buggy into the sea --

    Beside, I have business on hand, and must go to town within a day or two, and really should hardly feel justified in "vagabonding" just at present, -- unless the weather should turn out uncommonly warm, when of course sketching comes in, or long drives or anything of the kind which one does on a specially pleasant day.

    I have only been in Beverly since three days, having

[ Page 3 ]

lingered as long as my conscience justified -- or rather longer! -- in Pepperell.  I had a really delightful fortnight there.  My little Aunt Mrs. King* was, and still is there, and Mrs. Hale and Nellie,* and some other nice people of whom I must tell you some day, and I had the best sort of time "playing" with Nellie -- we really had great fun, and I must tell you all about it when I see you.

    Marianne* writes that she truly loved the little Chair story, and she has sent it to another friend of hers now,

[ Page 4 ]

so you see your circulation in Germany is increasing!

    I have sent her David Berry now.  That was a very true one I think.  I am sure it happened in Beverly.  Everything is getting so horribly modern here now that it makes me feel quite homesick.  The electric lights reach all the way down to the corner, and we have escaped electric-cars only by a very small vote at town meeting the other day.

    If you are to be in Boston this week or next, I wish you would let me know, because I shall have to go down once or twice and

[ Page 5 ]

perhaps could go to the station by way of Charles Street.

    Ellis* is in Cambridge and hard at work.  He has a room there till he joins us in town about November 1st.

    We hope to catch some more warm days by staying here a little longer, but if it stays so cold we shall probably wish we had n't!

    Beverly is very quiet at this season and a little lonely -- but it is a good thing to have a little time to sort one's thoughts before taking the plunge into winter occupations --

[ Page 6 ]

    There are some European Sketches for you to see -- but not very many I am sorry to say.  I did some work at Pepperell.  I think my New England blood is coming to the surface, for even after England and Germany and the Tyrol, our Massachusetts hills and meadows charmed my brush, and I felt in

[ Page 7 ]

harmony with my subjects more than ever before. -- I must tell you about the Pepperell days -- there are some things I have saved up for you especially.  I hope I shall see you before too very long, because there are one or two million things I might tell you, and tales get stale by keeping, they are nicest fresh from the oven!

    Please give my love to Mrs. Fields if you are with her.

    Always yours very truly

Loulie.


Notes

1891:  Dresel mentions two of Jewett's stories that had appeared in June and August of 1891.

Pepperell:  This town in northern Massachusetts is named after the colonial soldier, Sir William Pepperell.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields, who resided at Charles Street in Boston and at Thunderbolt Hill in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. King: Caroline Howard King. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Hale and NellieEllen (Nelly) Day Hale (1855-1940) was an American impressionist painter who studied with William Morris Hunt and at the Julian Art School in Paris. She is known for portraits, landscapes, and genre painting.  Her father was the orator, Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909); her mother was Emily Baldwin Perkins (1829-1914).  Mrs. Hale was an aunt of Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935).

Marianne:  Marianne Theresia Brockhaus.  See Correspondents.

little Chair story:  "Peg's Little Chair" appeared in Wide Awake (33:204-214) in August 1891.

David Berry: "The Failure of David Berry" first appeared in Harper's Magazine in June 1891.  It concerns an aging shoemaker who is not able to prosper as local conditions change.

Ellis:  Dresel's brother.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Louisa Dresel to SOJ

Beverly -- Tuesday
[ October 13 or 20, 1891]*
Dear S O J,

    It was good to hear from you, even though you could tell nothing better.

    I am so sorry that your mother has been no better, and I am sorry too to think that you are out of my reach, in the to me always rather mythical South Berwick home --

    But Manchester is perhaps not very desirable such a day as today, when on our lesser hill-top we are being deluged and

[ Page 2 ]

blown away.  And I almost hope Mrs. Fields* is in the safer haven of Charles St.  We are to move some days sooner than we at first thought (the 30th) so shall see her in town before long.

    I had glimpses of Mrs Whitman* twice, once in the cars, when I had her quite to myself all the way from Beverly to Boston which was delightful -- but the shore is getting rather deserted, and viewed in the rain, town-life possesses some attractions.  I am going into oil paints Nov. 1st, -- this sounds a little as if I were a small boy "going into long pants" and the sensation is analogous, being a sort of promotion!

[ Page 3 ]

There are good reasons, which it would take too long to explain --

    I am sending you a book, to read three stories in -- do not take the trouble to return it by mail, but put it in your trunk any time when you come to Boston, and leave it at Mrs Fields's for me -- I think that you will like these three: "Rève" p. 3, "Chagrin d'un veiux forçat" p. 19, "Dans le passé mort" p. 177.  The title of the book* is lugubrious ^enough^ to scare any one, and indeed I should not call any of the stories very cheering, nor should I advise any one to read certain of the others, unless they wished to court the blues.  I read the whole book through

[ Page 4 ]

-- at sea -- Except where he gets too dismal there is such charming imagination and such a delicate touch that I quite unexpectedly found myself liking the book --

    The day I came down from Pepperell,* I started at quarter of seven in the morning, and there drove to the station ^in the coach^ with me a middleaged woman with whom in the course of three miles I became quite intimate.  She said she came down ^up to P.^ the day before to "the wedding," she did not say whose, because she thought of course I knew, so I carefully did not let on that I did n't, and she told me all about it, and just how the bride's dress was trimmed, and about the reception, and that she had

[ Page 5 ]

some bride-cake & some wedding-cake in a box to take home to her husband, and that the weather being so uncertain she had n't dared to wear up her good dress, but had it in the paper-box, which was inconvenient about changing cars in Boston -- And then she said that "Harriet" wore nile-green to be married in, and for her part she did like to see a bride in white, and last year Mary Walker* was married in a navy blue silk and a white veil, and she did n't think it looked well though twas a real heavy silk, and that "Harriet" wore a half-moon of orange flowers in her hair, and made a real lovely bride --

[ Page 6 ]

Mrs. Blake* had asked her to stay till the later train, but she guessed she'd better not, because there was always such a lot to clear up in a house after a wedding, so she thought she'd better go, though she was kind of tired, as she'd never go to bed till twelve oclock, and then Mrs. Blake had come in to talk things over after she got in bed -- " [so written]

    -- I think Pepperell is really a place for studies in your department, for whenever I go there I keep meeting with things that ought to be in your stories.  Don't you think the navy blue silk and white veil ought to work in well some day?

[ Page 7 ]

    I wish you knew the Pecks --* and the farm.  There were nine little pigs this Autumn who ran about loose, and used to come into the carriage-house which Nellie Hale* and I used as studies, and stand in a row and stare at us while we worked, and then when one of us moved, dash off in a way which gave me a clearer idea than ^I^ ever ^had^ before of how the herd of swine* rushed into the sea in the Bible when the demon entered into them! --

    Good-by, this letter is a not-to-be-answereed one -- or I should feel

[ Page 8 ]

naughty for writing so soon again.

    But you see I think of you so often that sometimes I feel like writing, and I send you dearest love, and tell you again that your are not to answer notes from me unless you like, or ever do anything of the kind regarding me, because with me it really does not matter in the least, and I think this is one advantage about being acquainted with me.

    I shall hear of you through Mrs. Fields soon.

Yours, Loulie.


[ Down from the left margin across the top margin of page 1 ]

I drove to Chebacco ponds* on Sunday and the maples were gorgeous, like flames reflected in the water.  How are they up your way?  Here they are fine only by the brooks & swamps, elsewhere it has been too dry, I suppose --



Notes

October 13 or 20, 1891:  Dresel's descriptions of colored maple leaves places this letter in October.  Her reference to Pierre Loti's book as new, places it in 1891.  This seems clearly to follow her letter of 12 October 1891.  Her reference to the illness of Jewett's mother anticipates Mrs. Jewett's death on 21 October 1891. October 13 and 20 fell on Tuesday that year.
    Dresel seems to be inconsistent in her use of the subscript opening quotation mark.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Mrs Whitman: Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

title of the book:  Dresel refers to The Book of Pity and of Death (1891) by Pierre Loti (Louis Marie-Julien Viaud, 1850-1923).  The stories she recommends are: "A Dream," "The Sorrow of an Old Convict," and "In the Dead Past."
    See 1892 English translation by T. P. O'Connor.

Pepperell:  This town in northern Massachusetts is named after the colonial soldier, Sir William Pepperell.

Harriet ... Mary Walker:  The identities of these persons are not known.

Mrs. Blake:  The identity of this person is not known.

the Pecks:  The identity of this family is not known.

Nellie HaleEllen (Nelly) Day Hale (1855-1940). She was an American impressionist painter who studied with William Morris Hunt and at the Julian Art School in Paris. She is known for portraits, landscapes, and genre painting.  Her father was the orator, Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909); her mother was Emily Baldwin Perkins (1829-1914).  Mrs. Hale was an aunt of Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935).

herd of swine:  The story of Jesus's exorcism of the Gadarene demoniac appears in Mark 5:1-20, Luke 8:26-39, and Matthew 8:28-34.

Chebacco ponds:  Five ponds in Essex and Hamilton, Massachusetts, the largest of which is Chebacco Lake.  They are between Beverly and Essex.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Agnes Bartlett Brown
    

     South Berwick, Maine

     October 17, [1891]

    Dear Mrs. Brown:

     I wonder if you still have that painting of the high green hillside in the twilight with the moon rising? I find myself thinking of it wistfully from time to time. Will you tell me if you have it, or if I can! -- and the price? It was in your last spring's exhibition.

     I am sorry that I have seen you so very little this summer. I was very glad to spend those unexpected few minutes with you in the Newburyport station. It has been such a sad summer to me with my mother's illness growing worse and worse. She is very very ill just now and I think that the last few days have been worst of all. You can understand all this and the long nights and days.

     I am not sure whether you are still in Newburyport, but whether you are there or in New York, I send much love to you and Mr. Brown and my best regards to your sister.

     Yours affectionately,

     Sarah O. Jewett


Note

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.




21 October 1891
Death of Jewett's mother
Caroline Frances Perry Jewett



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ 

October, 1891.

     My thoughts and love have been yours, ever since I saw the brief word which told that your dear Mother had been taken into heaven,* and the love stays with you now saying no word because no word is deep, or sweet, or rich enough . . . but I wish my steps might tend Eastward rather, and so find you in the old places, with the pain of loss everywhere and yet with a diviner gain beside.


Notes

your dear Mother: Sarah Orne Jewett's mother, Caroline Frances Perry Jewett, died on 21 October 1891.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



SOJ to Lilian Woodman Aldrich

South Berwick
Monday 26 October [ 1891 ]

My dear Lilian

    I thank you so much for your kind letter to Mary* and me -- it seemed almost like seeing you. Indeed I am very sure of your sympathy and affection. Of course it has been a great comfort to know that my dear mothers long illness

[ Page 2  ]

has ended, but the sorrow is none the less heavy.* I hope that it may be very long before the same grief comes to you -- but I find it true now as I have found before that one never knows ones dear friends until they are gone and I know my dear mother and feel nearer her than ever.

[ Page 3  ]

    It is so kind of you to think of our coming for a few days -- it was like you to think of it, but I believe that it is best for Mary & me to stay here just now.  We both send you our love and thanks.

Yours affectionately

S. O. J.   

I wish that you ^ 'both'^ could have

[ Page 4  ]

been here Friday. A.F.* came the evening after mother's death and stayed until the funeral was over and was such a comfort! The last few days went so swiftly and in such anxiety that I could not write [ and possibly deleted ] ^could^ hardly think of anything outside these four walls. Thank you again dear Lilian for writing to us.

Notes

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents.

heavy: Caroline Frances Perry Jewett died 21 October 1891.

A. F.: Annie Fields (1834-1915).  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Bailey Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2741.



SOJ to Louisa Dresel

     South Berwick, Maine
     October 28, 1891

     My dear Loulie:

     Thank you for your dear letter. It is a great comfort to know that my dear mother's illness is ended1 but the loss falls just as heavily in our hearts -- perhaps more so because all her pain and suffering brought us closer than anything else ever did. These last few weeks have been most hard to bear but as I look back I find some of the dearest and best minutes that my mother and I ever had together scattered along the way. I miss her and miss her: it seems impossible that she should be gone. A. F.* came at once from Manchester and was the best of comforts. I don't know what we should have done without her.

     Give my dear love to Mrs. Dresel and I send my love to you Loulie dear with thanks for the book which I shall read presently. I know about it and am so glad to see it.

     Yours ever affectionately,

     S. O. J.
 

Notes

     1Housebound from protracted ailments, Mrs. Caroline Perry Jewett died on October 21, 1891. Jewett wrote frequently and glowingly in letters about her father but usually restricted remarks about her mother to a sentence or so on her vacillating condition. This is Sarah's most extended revelation of feeling about her mother to appear in print.

A.F.:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

  The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College. 


     SOJ to Horace Scudder

     South Berwick, Maine
     October 29, 1891

    My dear Mr. Scudder:

     My sister and I thank you sincerely for your kind letter. It is of course a great comfort just now to think that my mother's long illness is over, but the loss of her presence is very hard to bear, and these are most sad days to us.1
 
     It was very kind in you to write, and we both send our kindest thanks to you, and to Mrs. Scudder for her messages.

     Your most truly,

     S. O. Jewett

Notes

     1 Miss Jewett's mother died October 21, 1891.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.


 
SOJ to an unknown recipient

Friday
[ November 1891 ]

……….…I always remember dear Ellen Mason's* writing me that we always feel like a child as long as our mothers live and then feel as if we were left alone to face the world for the first time.

 
Notes

November 1891:  Because this fragment expresses Jewett's feeling about her mother's death, it seems likely to have been composed soon after October of 1891.

Ellen Mason:  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to George E. Woodberry



          South Berwick, Maine, 1 November, 1891.

     My dear Mr. Woodberry, -- I wish to thank you most heartily for your essay upon Mr. Lowell in the "Century."* I do not know when I have read anything with such delight and admiration. I only wish that it had been printed in spring instead of autumn, -- but if it comes too late for his own eyes to see, at least the eyes of other Americans will read it clearer now.

     I hope that I shall see you some day. I have always wished to thank you for the pleasure I have had in your use of your beautiful gifts in poetry and prose, but this essay leaves me more grateful than ever.

Notes

Mr. Woodberry ... essay upon Mr. Lowell in the "Century": George E. Woodberry (1855-1930) published "James Russell Lowell" in The Century 43: 1 (Nov 1891), pp. 113-19.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Silvanus Hayward

South Berwick Maine
10 November 1891

Dear Mr. Hayward

     My sister and I feel most grateful to you for the kindness and sympathy of your letter. It is a great comfort to know that my dear mother's pain and weariness are ended, but we miss her more than I can say. We have grown more dependent upon her and she upon us in all these long months. I need not tell you how great a change and how sad a change it makes in our lives to have her gone.**

     I wish to thank you too for sending me the History of Gilsum.* I have been reading it with real pleasure and admiring all the way the pains you must have taken. I seem to know the town now almost as well as if I had been there; next to the story of a man's life comes the story of a town's in interest and human value, and I think that you have done a beautiful piece of work in the Gilsum Biography. I wish that you would take the Three Berwicks next!* I often wish that we had at least some part of the interesting records and traditions of that dear old town. Believe that I appreciate the value of such a present as this you have given me, if only in proof of your kind friendship. I find many touching pages -- the patience and hardship of the early settlers, the ['vaudoo'?] of the little town charge, the shining [bits?] of garnet in the village street and much beside for which I should like to thank you most particularly. Please give my love to Bell and do not forget that I am

     Yours sincerely and with great regard

     Sarah O. Jewett
 
 

Notes

have her gone: Jewett's mother, Caroline Perry Jewett, died on 21 October 1891 after a long illness.

Gilsum: Silvanus Hayward published History of the Town of Gilsum, New Hampshire from 1752 to 1879 in 1881.

Three Berwicks:  Jewett's home village of South Berwick, ME is near two other villages: North Berwick and Berwick.

vaudoo: An alternate spelling for voodoo.

Bell:  Hayward's eldest child by his first marriage. See Correspondents.

The ms. of this letter is held by the Berwick Academy Archives, item: 1996.0196.  The transcription appears here with the permission of the Archives.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

November, 1891.

     To-day I am making a sad little pilgrimage to Lowell, whence has suddenly departed one who was oh so good to me when I was a little child.* The leaves fall fast from the tree of earthly life, and one has to live on a sort of military basis: going to the grave with muffled drums, and returning with the flag flying yet once again.


Notes

Lowell ... suddenly departed one who was oh so good to me: Lowell, in northeastern Massachusetts, is Whitman's birthplace. The person who has died is unknown. Assistance is welcome.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109. 



 SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Thursday morning

[ 12 November 1891 ]

Dear Mary

What a beautiful tale of going to the farm! but I am afraid that you liked the road less than usual by what you say of the sleighing.  You might have said who you went with but it sounds as if it were Dicky!* -- I had a long visit from Cora* yesterday afternoon and she was in great spirits and I very steady minded.  I talked so long that I wheezed, subjects came up!  There were those that had Brother Boylston* to lunch, he being in town to a meeting of The Loyal Legion* and a great little yeast was provided which I shared though I left them to themselves and didn’t go down.  We had a nice time in the library afterward.  Rose came at six and then they parted away to Faneuil Hall and sat together with Annette* and friends and had a great time, and Mrs. Fields* didn’t get home until so late that I had to speak to her, I having been asleep and well tucked up.  She says that both Lady Henry & Miss Willard* are perfectly beautiful speakers, with so much charm of voice and manners, not speak of good sense and dignity.  I quite wanted to go with A.F. & Rose when they were starting out.  Dr. Morton came in later and then Mr. Millet* for a little while so I got me to bed feeling that I had had a bustling day.  I asked Rose to come down to Berwick next summer and she was pleased with the thought, and promptly mentioned that we might go to Greenacre.*  Thank you for seeing about the bank -- did Becca* happen to say what was in the savings bank? -- Mr. Barker wrote me from Atlanta* that there had been some delay about getting the title in the loan for which I sent the money down but if it wasnt all right he would look up another as good.  I havent much news today it being early yet.  I think it is nice about Annie Lord.*  Love to all from Sarah.  I think I shall get at my great heap of letters today, but I mean to save a nice heap to do at Mrs. Cabot’s,* where Maud Scott* is always wanting to write for me, and seems to like the change.  Sister must be thinking of whist.!’ [so transcribed ]

 

Please tell Helen Sewall that the Atlantic is paid for ’95.*

  

Notes

1891:  A handwritten note on this transcription reads: winter of 1884-5?  However, this letter clearly refers to the Wednesday 11 November 1891 convention of the WCTU in Boston as indicated in the notes below.  Almost certainly, then, this letter was composed on the following day.  Another dating complication is the post script, which suggests that a payment has been made to Atlantic Monthly for an 1895 subscription, though perhaps it has quite another meaning.

Dicky: A Jewett family horse, named in letters of the 1880s.

Cora:  Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

Brother Boylston: Probably, this is Annie Fields's brother, Dr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams, Jr. See Fields in Correspondents. For an account of his life, including his Civil War service, see Rita Gollin, Annie Adams Fields, pp. 13-14.

the Loyal Legion:  Presumably, this is the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, a patriotic organization of Union officers formed at the end of the American Civil War in 1865.

Rose ... Annette ... Mrs. Fields:  Rose almost certainly is Rose Lamb.  For her and Annie Adams Fields, see Correspondents.
Annette probably is Annette Rogers, about whom little is yet known.  Her name is listed with contributors to and officers for the Overseers of the Poor for the City of Boston, where Annie Fields also was active.  She helped to organize the Howard Industrial School for "colored" refugees from the Civil War in Cambridge, MA.  See Lydia H. Farmer, What America Owes to Women (1893, p. 365).

Lady Henry & Miss WillardLady Henry Somerset (1851-1921) was a British philanthropist who focused on women's rights and temperance.  With Frances Willard (see Correspondents), she formed part of the leadership of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union.  They first met at the first convention of the World Woman's Christian Temperance Union at Faneuil Hall in Boston on 11 November 1891.  For an account of this convention, see A Brief History of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (1907), by Katharine Lent Stevenson, pp. 61-2.

Dr. Morton ... Mr. Millet: Dr. Helen Morton (1834-1916) had offices successively on Marlboro, Boylston, and Chestnut streets in Boston. Richard Cary says that Jewett once characterized her as "touchy {touching?} in her doctorly heart and more devoted in her private capacity as a friend."
    It is likely that Mr. Millet is Francis Davis Millet (1848-1912), an Americn painter, sculptor and writer who died aboard the RMS Titanic.

Greenacre:  Jewett may refer to the Greenacre house in Farmington, ME, a famously ornate Victorian home.  Or perhaps she refers to the Moses Farmer home in Eliot, ME, which in 1894 became a center for interfaith religious meetings and activity, under the leadership of Farmer and his daughter, Sarah Jane Farmer (b. 1847).  Eventually the site became the Green Acre Bahá'í School.

Becca ... in the savings bank ...  Mr. Barker wrote me from Atlanta: The Jewetts' friend Rebecca Young was treasurer of the South Berwick Savings Bank.  Mr. Barker's identity and the nature of the business he is handling for the Jewetts remains unknown. See Correspondents.

Annie Lord:  The Lord family in New England was extensive, making it almost impossible, without more information, to know to which Ann or Hannah Lord this letter refers.

Mrs. Cabot’s ... Maud Scott:  For Susan Burley Cabot, see Correspondents.  
    Miss Maud Scott is listed as a resident at the Bellevue Hotel in Clark's Boston Blue Book (1895), p. 84.  Other letters indicate she is available for typing manuscripts and sometimes provides this service to Jewett. No more about her has been discovered.  Assistance is welcome.

Helen Sewall ... the Atlantic is paid for ’95:  Probably Jewett refers to a South Berwick neighbor, Helen D. Sewall (1845-1922), who was sister to Jotham and Jane Sewall.  See Pirsig, The Placenames of South Berwick, p. 75.
    The Atlantic reference seems to say that the 1895 subscription has been paid, but that does not square with the explicit references to events of November 1891.  More information is welcome.
This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 73, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Thomas Bailey Aldrich


Hotel Brunswick New York

Saturday 21 November [ 1891 ]

My dear Friend 

          My dear Friend, -- I am writing this letter to thank you for your beautiful poem in memory of Mr. Lowell* -- but how can I find words to say what I wish to say about it! To me it speaks of him as his own presence used to speak, and brings him back again as if he came back with the old life and the new life mingled as indeed they are, and then I feel the loss afresh

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and somehow wake from the reading of the poem to know how great and how lovely a poem it is, and to be prouder of you than ever and of your always reverent and [ deleted letters ] happy use of your beautiful gift -- I wish that I could indeed tell you how much I thank you and how straight this last poem has gone to A. F.'s* heart and mine.

     A. F. is reading My Cousin the Colonel,* and bursting into laughter now and then [ as corrected ] one

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seldom hears her -- I always say that she is a poor supporter of story writers, but it is not true now that she can get hold of something of yours again.

     We have had a delightful week and it has been good for both of us -- ^Day before^ yesterday we had a great pleasure in Mr. Booth's sending for us to come and have tea with him and then showing us all the Players' Club -- ! --* but every day things have reminded me of you and Lilian.* We

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are to go home on Tuesday -- Forgive this bad pen that writes so blunderingly what was in my heart to say, but I cannot tell you with any pen how much I care about 'Elmwood.'

Your affectionately

Sarah O. Jewett

Notes

poem in memory of Mr. Lowell ... "My Cousin the Colonel":   Aldrich's poem in memory of Lowell appeared in December 1891:  "Elmwood -- In Memory Of James Russell Lowell," Scribner's Magazine 10: 6 (December, 1891). pp. 787-790.  Aldrich's story, "My Cousin the Colonel" appeared in Harper's in December 1891 and was collected in Two Bites at a Cherry, with other Tales (1893).

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Mr. Booth's ... the Players' Club
: Edwin Booth (1833 - June 7, 1893) was a founding member of the New York Players Club in 1888.  Booth was an internationally famous American-born Shakespearean actor, a member of the circle of friends in which Jewett moved. His brother, John Wilkes Booth (1835-1865), assassinated President Abraham Lincoln.

Lilian: Lilian Woodman Aldrich. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Thomas Bailey Aldrich Papers, 119 letters of Thomas Bailey and Lilian Woodman Aldrich, 1837-1926. MS Am 1429 (117). Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.
    At the bottom left of page one, in another hand, is a circled number: 2742.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with some alterations.  Below is her transcription.

          My dear Friend, -- I am writing this letter to thank you for your beautiful poem in memory of Mr. Lowell,* -- but how can I find words to say what I wish to say about it! To me it speaks of him as his own presence used to speak, and brings him back again as if he came back with the old life and the new life mingled, as indeed they are, and then I feel the loss afresh, and somehow wake from the reading of the poem to know how great and how lovely a poem it is, and to be prouder of you than ever, and of your always reverent and happy use of your beautiful gift. I wish that I could indeed tell you how much I thank you, and how straight this last poem has gone to A. F.'s* heart and mine.

     A. F. is reading "My Cousin the Colonel,"* and bursting into laughter now and then as one seldom hears her. I always say that she is a poor supporter of story-writers, but it is not true now that she can get hold of something of yours again.

     We have had a delightful week, and it has been good for both of us. Day before yesterday we had a great pleasure in Mr. Booth's sending for us to come and have tea with him, and then showing us all the Players' Club!* But every-day things have reminded me of you and Lilian. We are to go home on Tuesday. Forgive this bad pen that writes so blunderingly what was in my heart to say, but I cannot tell you with any pen how much I care about "Elmwood."



SOJ to Louisa Dresel

     South Berwick, Maine

     Sunday November 22, [1891]

     Dear Loulie:

     I spent nearly a week in town, but I was not well and had to keep myself very quiet, so that I thought about you but did not send you word that I was there as I meant to do. Now that I am at home again I am better and begin already to think of what I shall do when I go to town again.

     Mrs. Fields did not get home from Baltimore* until Monday morning and then I was so sorry to give up doing some things that we wished to do together, but there were very dear things in the visit after all.

     I hope that you are feeling much better again? Do find time to read the Journal of Sir Walter Scott!1 It is the most enchanting and appealing of books, though I am not sure that "Mamma" won't care more for it than you will. I think that it belongs to our day more than to yours! but, I do not speak slightingly with all my pride and appreciation - ! -- !

     Yours most affectionately,

     S. O. J.
 

Cary's Note

     1The Journal of Sir Walter Scott, from the original manuscript at Abbotsford, was originally published in two volumes in 1890. Harper & Brothers issued a popular edition in one volume in 1891. A copy of the New York 1901 edition is in Miss Jewett's library.

Editor's Notes

Baltimore:  Fields often visited Baltimore, MD where her sister, painter Elizabeth (Lissie) Adams (1825-1898) resided.

  The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Agnes Bartlett Brown 

     Wednesday morning
     [November-December 1891]

    My dear friend:

     I send you this cheque because I have a feeling that you would not like it so well if I changed the amount as I should really like to do. I feel as if you 'had it your way' and gave me the dear little picture! and I thank you most warmly. I care very much for your beautiful work and I wish that I could give you half so much pleasure with mine.1 I wish too that I could make you understand how sincerely and affectionately I am ever your friend
     S. O. J.


Notes

     1 As a young girl Miss Jewett dreamed of a career in art. She turned out numerous pen and ink drawings, and kept her hand in desultorily at watercolors and oils until late in life.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine

Editor's Note

It is not clear whether Cary meant to imply that Jewett hoped to please Brown with her drawing or painting rather than with her writing.  What picture Jewett bought from Brown has not yet been determined.  Cary notes elsewhere that Jewett bought at least one painting from Brown's husband, John Appleton Brown.  See Correspondents.



SOJ to Miss Gilman*

South Berwick Maine
5 December 1891

Dear Miss Gilman

        It is uncertain when I shall be in town again, -- possibly next week for a day or two, -- and so I must wait before I can send you a definite word --  Perhaps it would be better if you wrote me here if it is anything about which

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you feel hurried.  I shall be glad if I can be of any use.

    Pray believe me

Yours sincerely
Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

Miss Gilman:  Identifying Miss Gilman is difficult.  The Massachusetts Historical Society's catalog entry for the Gilman family papers gives no dates or family relationships for the sisters, Julia and Hannah Gilman.  The Gilman Family Papers include correspondence and other papers (1857-1937) of the sisters, "relating to their teaching and the establishment of the Gilman School (later Miss Choate School), Boston, Mass."  In the same collection of papers is correspondence of the educator Arthur Gilman (1837-1909), who with his wife, Stella Scott Gilman, founded the Harvard Annex, which eventually became Radcliffe College.
    Arthur Gilman was an editor of the Putnam's Sons series of historical books, "The Story of the Nations" to which Jewett contributed The Story of the Normans (1887).
    According to the Scheslinger Library, in 1886 Mr. and Mrs. Gilman also "founded the Gilman School for Girls in Cambridge, later the Cambridge School of Weston."  While this suggests that Arthur was closely related to Julia and Hannah, on-line genealogical information indicates they were not siblings.  Arthur was the son of a prominent abolitionist banker, Winthrop Sargent Gilman
    On-line genealogical searching leads to the sisters, Julia Gilman Newell (1838- ?) and Hannah Gilman (1842-1923), daughters of Benjamin Brown Gilman and Sally Gilman.  Whether these are the sisters who are associated with the Gilman School has not been verified.  If they are, then this letter would be addressed to the elder sister, Julia.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Massachusetts Historical Society in the Gilman Family Papers, Ms N-1291, Correspondence of Hannah & Julia Gilman, 1857-1937. The letter is collected in an autograph album labeled "Gilman Family; Hannah and Julia Gilman 1879-1926."  Transcription by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel

South Berwick
24 December 1891

My dearest Loulie

    I hope that this note will reach you on Christmas morning and give you my love and good wishes,  I shall be thinking of you and 'Mamma' tomorrow.  I hope that it will be a very dear day to you.

    God bless you and keep  you my dear friend!

Yours affectionately

        S. O. J

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I hope to be in town again on Saturday


Notes

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Small Library, University of Virginia, Special Collections MSS 6218, Sarah Orne Jewett Papers.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



John Greenleaf Whittier to Annie Adams Fields

29 December 1891

    From John B. Pickard, The Letters of John Greenleaf Whittier v. 3, p. 591.

The best thing on my birthday* was to meet thee and our dear Sarah* on the stairs, and the worst was that you went away so soon. Looking at the wreath which still hangs all bright in our diningroom, I am tempted to let myself down to poetry: --

Blossom and greenness, making all
The wintry birthday tropical,
    And the plain Quaker parlors gay,
Have died on bracket, stand, and wall.
I saw them fade and droop and fall,
    And laid them tenderly away.

White virgin lilies, mignonette,
Blown rose and pink and violet,—
    A breath of fragrance passing by,
A dream of beauty and decay,
Colors and shapes which could not stay, --
    The fairest, sweetest, first to die.

But still this rustic wreath of thine
Of wintergreen, and bay, and pine,
    The wild growths of our forest land,
Woven and wound with careful pains,
And tender wish and prayer, remains,
    As when it dropped from love's dear hand.'"

Notes

birthday: Whittier's birthday was 17 December.

Sarah:  Sarah Orne Jewett.




from George Bainton, The Art of Authorship.  New York: Appleton, 1891, 177-8.
Bainton solicited letters from authors about the art of writing.

SARAH ORNE JEWETT is one of the best literary artists amongst the American writers of short stories Her composition is simple, yet full of force; while the pictures she paints of village life are inspired by a deep-felt sympathy with the common people. "I hardly know what to say about my early plans," she writes, "and especially about any definite study that I gave to the business of writing. I was not a studious child, though always a great reader, and what individuality I have in my manner of writing must be a natural growth and not the result of study or conscious formation. Of course, at one time, I, like all young people, was possessed of great admiration for different authors, but I do not remember trying to copy their style in any way, excepting that I remember thinking that if I could write just as Miss Thackeray* did in her charming stories I should be perfectly happy. I tried to model some of my own early work on her plan. I see very little likeness, I am sorry to say, as I read it over now! I believe very much in reading English books like Walton's* and others of his time; though I think I have learned as much from the telling of simple stories and character sketches in the 'Sentimental Journey'* as from anything. They were great favourites with my father, and were easily impressed on my mind; the monks, and the starling, and the peasants' dance in particular."
 
Notes

Miss Thackeray:  British novelist William M. Thackeray's daughter, also a novelist, Anne Isabella Thackeray, Lady Ritchie (1837-1919).

WaltonIzaak Walton (1594 - 1683), the English author of The Compleat Angler.

'Sentimental Journey':  A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy (1767) is a novel by Laurence Sterne (1713-1768).



SOJ to an unknown recipient


  South Berwick, Maine
[ 1891 ]


….…I was so pleased to find that Tales of New England* had gone to a second edition in London.

 

  Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Tales of New England:  Jewett's volume of previously collected stories appeared in 1890.  WorldCat lists a London edition in 1893, but does not specify which edition it is.  I have tentatively placed this letter in 1891, as the earliest likely date for a second British edition.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Edited by Terry Heller, Coe College.



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