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Sarah Orne Jewett Letters of 1893




SOJ to Mary Bucklin Davenport Claflin

South Berwick
2 January 1893

Dear Mrs. Claflin

    It was so good of you to think of me at Christmas time!  I have taken the forget-me-nots in good earnest ^because you see I didn't exactly need them !!^  [ begin insertion  below the line] except in their capacity as a [needle back ? end insertion below the line] -- I only wish that we were near enough to talk together for it seems such a long time since I saw you and there are so many things to be said.  The year that has just closed has been a

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year of change and loss, but I hope that this new [one blotted] will be full of good cheer and hopefulness to you and to me and all those whom we love.  And yet this very morning came the news of dear kind Mr. Horsford's death.*  I feel so sorry for them all, and I know so well how hard it is to bear such a sudden blow -- ---

    I have been very little in Town* since I came back in October, now and [then corrected] I go to Charles St. for a Sunday or for two or three days and

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once Mrs. Fields* has been here.  We did not know that you and the governor had gone South until one day when Mrs. Fields went ^to 63*^ hoping to find you and was told that you had flown -- but directly after that all the newspapers spoke of it! --

    I wish that I knew where you are!  I am proud to say that we are not having a terrible New England winter this year -- As I look out of my windows it seems like April, but I suppose that snow will be falling soon.  This appears to be the January thaw with nothing to thaw. 

    We are all pretty well, and as busy as usual

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with works and ways.*  Mary* spent week before last with Mrs. Tyler* and found the new house very pleasant.  I had a great plan about making the girls' and Theodore* go South with me when January came in, but so far we have hardly wished for any change of climate -- The few cold days have not been unwelcome.  Yet I do envy you -- it is lovely to be where green things are growing.  Dont you believe that if "Thy friend"* had once gone to Florida and escaped his months of neuralgia he would have done it every year with joy?  How we miss him, dont we!  I went to the Amesbury memorial meeting,* with the Cartlands* and it was interesting -- "in a way" --  Dr. Leslie's* brief address was very simple and touching and what thy friend would

[ up the left margin and across the top margin of page one ]

have liked -- but I didn't care much for 'Senator' Patterson's* address.  Mrs. Fields has not been free from her winter colds [ink spot?]  I am sorry to say but she has been getting out a good deal, the weather has been fair.  I seem to say a good deal about weather in this letter but it is the time of year when one is often reminded of it!

    Good by.  I wish you and

[ Written up the left margin of page two ]

Mr. Claflin a happy new year -- I wish I could spent this afternoon with you both instead of only sending a stupid letter.  Please give

[ Written up the left margin of page three ]

my love to Mary* [unrecognized word] when you write.  Yours always affectionately

[ Written down the top margin of page three ]

Sarah O. Jewett

 
Notes


Mr. Horsford's death:  Eben Norton Horsford died on 1 January 1893. See Correspondents.  The first page of this letter has a black border, presumably to indicate mourning for Professor Horsford.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

63:  The Claflin's winter home was 63 Mount Vernon St. in Boston.

works and ways:  In her letters, Jewett several times repeats this phrase, sometimes within quotation marks.  The actual phrase does not appear, as one might expect, in the King James Bible, though it is suggested in several places: Psalms 145:17, Daniel 4:37, and Revelations 15:3.  In each of these passages, the biblical author refers to the works and ways of God.  Jewett may be quoting from another source or from commentary on these passages, which tend to emphasize that while God's ways are mysterious, they also are to be accepted humbly by humanity.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Tyler: Augusta Maria Denny Tyler.  See Correspondents.

the girls' and Theodore:  Presumably, Jewett refers to the family members living next door to each other in 1893, sisters Mary Rice Jewett and Carrie Augusta Eastman and Carrie's son, Theodore Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.

"Thy friend":  John Greenleaf Whittier.  See Correspondents.

the Amesbury memorial meeting:  The New York Times of 18 December, 1892, p. 5, reported a 17 December Amesbury, MA "Memorial to Whittier" on the birthday following his death on 7 September of that year.  The article reports:
The exercises were held in the Opera House this afternoon and were of a special memorial character.  Among those present were Prof. E. C. Smythe, Andover; Abigail Dodge, (Gail Hamilton,) Lucy Stone, John W. Hutchinson, Lynn; Henry Cabot Lodge, E. Mody Boynton, Brooklyn; Charles Carleton Coffin, Prof. Bancroft of Andover, and others of local professional and literary note.
    The exercises opened with a prayer by the Rev. Dr. William J. Tucker of Andover and the singing of "Immortal Love, Forever Full," words by Mr. Whittier, by a quartet.  The President of the day, Dr. H. G. Leslie, then addressed the gathering.  Dr. Leslie read a touching poem by Margaret Sangster, following which Prof. Churchill of Andover read selections from the songs of the dead poet.  Those were followed by an oration by the Hon. James W. Patterson of Hanover, N.H.  In the course of his analysis of the personal character and literary work of the dead poet, he said ....
    [ The reporter quotes at some length from the oration. ]
    At the conclusion of the oration, Miss Harriet Whittier of Cambridge sang a solo.  Prof. Churchill read "The Reformer," and the quartet sang "While the Years Roll on" and Whittier's poem, "Just a Song at Twilight."  Prof. Churchill read brief poetical tributes contributed by Harriet Prescott Spofford, Lucy Larcom, Robert Purvis, and Louise Chandler Moulton, and letters of regret from Oliver Wendell Holmes, Robert C. Winthrop, E. C. Stedman, Gov. Russell, Gov. H. A. Tuttle of New-Hampshire, Charles Dudley Warner, Louise Chandler Moulton, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, Celia Thaxter, Henry L. Dawes, William H. Haile, A. E. Pillsbury, Robert Purvis, and William Cogswell.  The exercise closed with a benediction.
Cartlands:  Richard Cary says that Joseph Cartland (1810-1898) and Gertrude Cartland (1822-1911) ac­companied Whittier on his summer vaca­tions in Maine and New Hampshire for five decades, and Whittier lived in their home at New­buryport, Massachusetts most of his last fifteen winters.

Dr. Leslie's address: Horace Ganville Leslie (1842-1907), a physician and poet, served as a surgeon in the Civil War.  See The Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine, Volume 39 (1907), p. 326.

'Senator' Patterson's addressJames Willis Patterson (July 2, 1823 - May 4, 1893) was an American politician and a United States Representative and Senator from New Hampshire.

Mary: Mary Ellis, Mrs. Claflin's step-granddaughter.  See Emma Ellis in Correspondents. The manuscript of this letter is held by Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center in the  Governor William and Mary Claflin Papers,  GA-9, Box 4, Miscellaneous Folder J.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



S
OJ to Horace E. Scudder
 

     148 Charles Street
     Boston
     [January 27, 1893]

    Dear Mr. Scudder:

     Should you like to print this brief remembrance of yesterday in The Contributors' Club?1
 
     Yours sincerely,
     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

     1 Date and topic are established by an annotation on page 4 of this letter: "In C. C. after Bishop Brooks's funeral." Phillips Brooks (1835-1893), rector of Trinity Church, Boston, and Bishop of Massachusetts, died January 23, 1893, and was buried on the 26th. The sketch appeared, unsigned, under the title "At the Funeral of Phillips Brooks," in The Contributors' Club, Atlantic Monthly, LXXI (April 1893), 566-567. See Miss Jewett to Mrs. George D. Howe in Fields, Letters, 107-108.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.




SOJ to Samuel Thomas Pickard

148 Charles street
Tuesday 31st Jan. [1893]

Dear Mr. Pickard

    Your letter finds me here and fills me with hot anger.  The day I went to Amesbury to the memorial service I fell in with Phebe* who seated herself beside me and during the long wait in the train at the station and the short journey to Newburyport she talked of their fancied wrongs in a way that completely lost her anything that was left of an interest.  I have tried to keep hold of her for dear Mr. Whittier's* sake.  I answered her in a general way, but I hated what she said and the air of low gossip and vulgar talebearing with which she said it.  After I gladly left her and Mr. Garrison and I were making the rest of the journey to town he told me that they were behaving badly and that Phebe had been at the office in Park St.* and much offended their sense of propriety with these ridiculous stories.  I heard from him the true tale of the last days at Hampton Falls.*  Mrs. Fields* and I have wondered why our dear friend had evidently lost all interest in staying at Oak Knoll,* after appearing so pleased and contented there in earlier years: it came out in many ways and made him sad and troubled.

    It is very hard for you and Mrs. Pickard to have this going on, and I grieve bitterly for the dear friends at Newburyport, but it will all pass, it is not truth: and being beneath contempt we must not let ourselves be too much troubled about it.  You need not fear the prejudice of any one who really knows the least bit about the last five [years?] of Mr. Whittier's life.  I have heard so many people wonder why he didn't [talk?] about Oak Knoll as he used -- and these revelations will tell another tale [than?] the one the cousins have in mind.

    I  am most sorry that you are hampered in the use of material* -- but per[haps?] I drop this word of consolation into your ear -- they may be ambitious to [sell?] any fragments of material as soon as possible which will put them within [your?] reach!

    Mrs. Fields sends her very kind regards to you both, and wished me to [tell?] you that she happens to have a little book about our dear friend which she [thinks?] you may not know by Mr. George Stewart of Quebec* & there is a particularly valuable list in it of papers that had been written about him.  She will [send?] it to you with great pleasure if you do not know it; it is an out of the [way?] little book but you may, for all that, have it close under your hand.

    I have been hoping to see you both and wishing to write.  I am picking [out?] my letters as I promised, as fast as I can, but there will not be many of [any?] length, for as I have said, those were written to Mrs. Fields and so, he [wrote?] to both of us.

    I am particularly glad in view of all this trouble that Mrs. Fields said [what?] she did of the last days, of "those nearest to him" who ministered & his [love?] for Amesbury & the Cartlands.*  Believe me your sincere friend

                    Sarah O. Jewett

I have been thinking that in the spring you ought to come to S. Berwick so [that?] I may drive you down the riverside, at Rollinsford and show you some places [where?] Mr. Whittier used to visit with his mother.



Notes

Phebe ... Mr. Whittier:  Jewett refers to her friend, the recently deceased poet, John Greenleaf Whittier.  Richard Cary says: "Phebe Woodman Grantham was the adopted daughter of Whittier's cousin Abby J. Woodman. In her childhood she lived at Oak Knoll and was the object of much affection by Whittier, who wrote the poem "Red Riding Hood" for her. She became extremely possessive of Whittier in later life and, from accounts in Albert Mordell's biography and a letter by Miss Jewett to Samuel T. Pickard, could be unseemly sharp in defending her interest."

Mr. Garrison ... the office in Park St:   Francis Jackson Garrison of Houghton, Mifflin.  4 Park Street in Boston was the address of the publisher and of Atlantic Monthly.

Hampton Falls: Whittier died on 7 September, 1892 at Hampton Falls, New Hampshire.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Oak Knoll:  Richard Cary says: "In 1875 Whittier's cousins, the Misses Johnson and Abby J. Woodman, pur­chased a farm of sixty acres in Danvers and invited him to make his home there when­ever he wished. The place was notable for beautiful lawns, orchards, gardens, and grapevines. Whittier suggested the name of "Oak Knoll," which was immediately adopted."

hampered in the use of material:  Pickard was preparing his Life and Letters of John Greenleaf Whittier (1894).

Mr. George Stewart of Quebec: George Stewart (1848-1906) of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada was an editor, publisher, pharmacist, and author.  His book, Essays from Reviews (1892) contains a critical and biographical paper on Whittier.

Cartlands:  Richard Cary says: "Joseph Cartland (1810-1898) and Gertrude Cartland (1822-1911), ... ac­companied Whittier on his summer vaca­tions in Maine and New Hampshire for five decades, ... in whose home at New­buryport, Massachusetts, he lived most of his last fifteen winters."

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, folder 63, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Celia Laighton Thaxter to SOJ,

Portsmouth, February 5, 1893. 

    Oh, you dear and kindest, wisest and helpfulest! I thought I should remember every one and every word of your suggestions when you spoke them, but, alas! I rack my stupid and empty brain in vain for most of them, coming home to my turning, cleansing, ripping, patching, fixing-over dressmaker. These petty nothings have filled my head with only cobwebs, so that, when I begin my introductory chapter, those precious notes you gave me are vanished and I grope for them again in vain.* The Pinafore going down river like a May-day procession I remember; the flowers being always young; the fruits of sweet and bitter experience, and the Greek thing I was to ask Roland for, but the others are all gone. Perhaps you may remember. I am ashamed to be so stupid, but so many little cares come bothering me and taking what little sense I had. Pardon your loving

        SANDPIPER.*


Notes

those precious notes:  Thaxter is evidently at work on An Island Garden (1894).  For example, the Pinafore, mentioned later, was the steam tug by which Thaxter regularly traveled between Portsmouth and the Islands of the Shoals (see pp. 17, 125).

Sandpiper:  In notes to his collection of Sarah Orne Jewett Letters, Richard Cary says: "Miss Jewett almost always alluded to Mrs. Thaxter as "Sandpiper," after her well-known poem of that name, and Mrs. Thaxter reciprocated by signing her letters with a sketch of the small bird."

This extract from a letter appears in Letters of Celia Thaxter Edited by her friends, A. F. [Annie Fields] and R. L. [Rose Lamb], The Riverside Press, H. O. Houghton, & Co, Cambridge, Mass. 1895.  Annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Celia Laighton Thaxter to SOJ

Portsmouth [February 1893]*

    Thank you for your sweet letter and all your kind suggestions. I had already begun to "reef" my MS., and perceived at once, when I read it aloud, that it must be cut ever so much in places. Dear, you have given me a real helpful lift, because I have been doing this work without a particle of enthusiasm, in a most perfunctory manner, from the bits of notes I had made; and my mind has been so saddened by deep shadows* for many months, somehow I had no heart in it at all. I am hoping, when I go to the Shoals presently, to get some of the real flavor of the place and the work into it. It does n't satisfy me one bit. I began to write the introductory chapter right off, and shall I send it to you as you said? I am so glad for every bit of criticism. I was so happy when I wrote the Shoals book* -- it wrote itself. I seemed to have very little to do with it anyway. But now the shadows are so long, and it grows so lonesome on this earth, and there is such a chill where there used to be such warmth and bliss!


Notes

February 1892:  This date is inferred from Celia Thaxter Laighton to SOJ Portsmouth, February 5, 1893.

deep shadows:  Thaxter had been in ill health since September 1889, including bouts of depression.  She died 25 August 1894, months after the publication of An Island Garden (1894).

Shoals book: Thaxter is evidently at work on An Island Garden (1894).  Thaxter's Among the Isles of Shoals appeared in 1873.

This extract from a letter appears in Letters of Celia Thaxter Edited by her friends, A. F. [Annie Fields] and R. L. [Rose Lamb], The Riverside Press, H. O. Houghton, & Co, Cambridge, Mass. 1895. Annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett and Carrie Jewett Eastman

Wednesday

[ February 1893 ]*

Dear girls

                I must write my letters overnight -- I never have time in the morning to say half I want to. -- We are going to drive out to Mrs. Shaw's* to see the Millet's* at ten with the company.  Mr. Warner* is staying on{,} having a beautiful time like a girl!  The luncheon was very pleasant yesterday & we had him to it to everyone's great pleasure --& it stayed

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long.  Mrs. Gilder* came too -- and came back to dinner after Mrs. Fields* had taken her and Miss Dunham to see Dr. Holmes.* We had got tickets to two plays later in the week of Madame Duse but we had begun to lament not being there the first night and its being too late to get tickets then, and Miss Dunham flew off and did a pretty [unrecognized word] somehow or other of getting a row of

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fine seats, so we whisked on in great joy as you may imagine ----  It is a great joy of a visiting occasion.  My shortest story has just come back from The Century to be please made a little longer!*  which is easier in some ways that trying to shorten one.  You were righter than I about this writer's crop of tales [ Mary ?]!

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I was low in my mind and I still wish some were better than they be -- I hope you are getting to see the Port of York some of you, in company with Hattie.*  Ever so much love & tomorrow I shall be [unrecognized word] & tell things proper.  I have had to set the time of Miss Ticknor's* visit next Monday & Tuesday -- with every so much love

Sarah --


Notes

February 1893:  The actress Eleonora Duse toured in the United States, playing in Boston on three occasions during Jewett's life:  Her first two tours brought her to Boston in early February 1893 and the week of April 6, 1896.   Her 1902 tour put her in Boston in October, while Jewett was confined at home after her September carriage accident. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., died in 1894.  As he is mentioned in this letter, it must be from 1893.

Mrs. Shaw's ... Millet's: Mrs. Shaw may be Cora Lyman Shaw (1828-1922), who married Gardiner Howland Shaw of Boston (1819-1869).  Among the women acting in the Saturday Morning Club's February 1895 production of Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale was Emily Millet, so spelled, who played the young girl, Perdita.  This clue, however, has not yet led to identifying Mrs. Millet.  Note as well that Jewett's spelling of "Millet/Millett" varies between letters.

Mr. Warner: Charles Dudley Warner. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Gilder: Probably Helena de Kay, wife of Richard Watson Gilder.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Fields: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Miss Dunham: Helen Dunham was the daughter of James Dunham of New York, one of four sisters.  She married Theodore Holmes Spicer (1860-1935) of London, England, in 1910.  She was a friend of the American painter, John Singer Sargent, who made portraits of Helen (1892) and of her sister Etta (1895).  She also was a friend of Isabella Stewart Gardner. See Correspondents.

Dr. Holmes: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. See Correspondents.

two plays ... Madame Duse:  Eleonora Duse (1858-1924) was an Italian actress.  In February 1893, she was to appear in Boston in selections from her current repertoire: Fédora, La Dame aux Camélias, Fernande, Cavalleria Rusticana, Lo Locandiera, Divorçons, Francillon, and La Femm de Claude.  See Forrest Izard, Heroines of the Modern Stage (1915), pp. 171-202.

My shortest story ... The Century: Jewett's only story to appear in Century Magazine in 1893 was "The Hilton's Holiday" in September.

Port of York ... Hattie:  The identity of Hattie is uncertain.  She may be Hattie Denny, sister of Augusta Maria Denny Tyler. See Correspondents.  The Port of York, in this case, is almost certainly the town of York, ME, a summer resort town with a long beach and the home of a number Jewett friends.

Miss Ticknor's:  Richard Cary identifies Anna Eliot Ticknor (1823-1896). The eldest daughter of the American historian George Ticknor, she consorted with Jewett in Boston and in the Northeast Harbor-Mt. Desert region on the Maine coast. Miss Ticknor was one of the editors of Life, Letters, and Journals of George Ticknor (Boston, 1876), and sole editor of Life of Joseph Green Cogswell (Cambridge, Mass., 1874).

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in the Jewett Family Papers MS014.02.01.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett and Carrie Jewett Eastman

[ February 1893 ]*
Thursday morning

Dear Sisters

    I thought as soon as I waked up this morning how glad I was that you and Hattie went to York yesterday{;}  it is so cold and gray looking now out of these windows and so it must be at home.  We have been having nice times.  It was lovely driving out to Mrs. Shaws* yesterday and we had a good look at the pictures.  Mr. Warner* went away at half past three so dear and pleasant.  Miss Dunham & A. F.*  had both

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gone their ways -- and I saw him off.  Cora* was here calling and had a pretty pleasure of seeing him, and afterward Lizzie Bartol* came in and Marie* followed her --  They are known to each other and it seems Marie & the Doctor ^(Bartol)^  are great friends, so that that was a good call.  Afterward Miss Dunham and I raced over to the Sears's* to see a new picture in fact for her ^Miss Dunham^* to see all the pictures, and afterward we went to Mrs Howe's* where we found many friends

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and Mrs. Gilder* who came home again to dinner with us.  We [meant corrected] to go to see Fédora* tonight but Mrs. Fields* has just discovered that Madame Duse* is sick & not going to play.  I am not sorry about it.  We have been scurrying and it is always so nice just to sit and talk with nice people!  We are going to S.W.'s* to luncheon, and then I am going to take Mrs. Gilder to Roxbury where she wishes to call on the Percy Brownes* and I wish to go & see the

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Garrisons* and have been trying to get a chance to do all winter.

    I had such a nice dear [deleted word] ^letter^ [from corrected] Theodore,* with thoughts in it about a ramping Princess but I can always check her with the Curb on the bridle as I try to feel safe!!  Love to all -- Oh Mary I wish you would look in the clutter on my little table and see if you can find Between Mass & Vespers.*  The ink marked one that went to the magazine.   I cant find it here and it must be at home -- but if you cant you will have to

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put the one I showed you into an envelope & send it to Scribner & co 743 Broadway for the magazine -- & so deeply oblige a Sister.  They have written me again about it -- it is to go to the [Fair ? ] with the rest of the manuscripts for that number. 


Yours
(tho'
troublesome)
Seddy*

[Kitchen corrected ] has been pretty rich [Marie ? ] said -- they want you to come again --


Notes

March 1893:  This letter is dated in relation to the anticipated publication of Jewett's "Between Mass and Vespers."  See notes below.

Hattie: The identity of Hattie is uncertain.  She may be Hattie Denny, sister of Augusta Maria Denny Tyler. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Shaws: This may be Cora Lyman Shaw (1828-1922), who married Gardiner Howland Shaw of Boston (1819-1869). According to Back Bay Houses, 23 Commonwealth, Mrs. Shaw had recently moved to this address in the spring of 1893. What pictures they saw at the Shaw residence is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Mr. Warner:  Charles Dudley Warner. See Correspondents.

Miss Dunham & A. F.:  A.F. is Annie Adams Fields.
    Helen Dunham was the daughter of James Dunham of New York, one of four sisters.  She married Theodore Holmes Spicer (1860-1935) of London, England, in 1910.  She was a friend of the American painter, John Singer Sargent, who made portraits of Helen (1892) and of her sister Etta (1895).  She also was a friend of Isabella Stewart Gardner. See Correspondents.

Cora: Cora Clark Rice. See Correspondents.

Lizzie Bartol ,,, Marie followed her ... the Doctor:  Lizzie Bartol is Elizabeth Howard Bartol (1842-1927). Her parents were Cyrus Augustus Bartol (1813-1900) and Elizabeth H. Howard Bartol (1803-1883), inheritors of a large art collection from Mrs. Bartol's grandfather. The "doctor," then, is Lizzie's father, Dr. Cyrus Bartol (1813-1900), graduate of Bowdoin College, a Unitarian clergyman influential in the religious life and thought of Boston for half a century. An associate of James Rus­sell Lowell's father, Rev. Bartol became noted for his original, radical, epigram­matic sermons. See also The Encyclopedia of Transcendentalism, pp. 20-22.
    The identity of Marie remains unknown.

the Sears's ... the pictures: This is pure speculation at this point, but there are two places in Boston in 1893 that might have invited visitors to look at "pictures."  Willard Thomas Sears (1837-1920) was an important Boston architect, partnered with Charles A. Cummings.  They may have designed the Sears Building (1869) in Boston.  Sears married May Motte (1841-1930).  The likelihood of the Sears's being known to Fields and Jewett is fairly high as his firm designed their friend Isabella Stewart Gardner's Fenway Court (1896).
    Because Jewett refers to the location as "the Sears's," it seems likely she refers to the W. T. Sears residence rather than the Sears office building or to the Sears and Cummings offices.
    More and better information is welcome.  See also Wikipedia.

Mrs Howe's: Alice Greenwood Howe. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Gilder:  Probably Helena de Kay, wife of Richard Watson Gilder.  See Correspondents.

Fédora ... Madame Duse is sick & not going to play: Fédora (1882), by the French playwright Victorien Sardou (1831-1908).  Eleonora Duse (1858-1924) was an Italian actress.  She was to appear in Boston performances of Fédora in the February of 1893.  However in 1896, her repertoire did not include Fédora.  See Forrest Izard, Heroines of the Modern Stage (1915), pp. 171-202.

S.W.'s:  Sarah Wyman Whitman. See Correspondents.

Percy Brownes: Almost certainly, this is the Reverend Percy Browne (1840-1901) an Irish-born Episcopalian clergyman, who served at St. James Episcopal Church in Roxbury, MA from 1872 until his death. Though it seems he was married and had at least one child, Percy Brown, Jr., little information has been located about his family. See Chapter 9 of Judith W. Rosbe, Marion in the Golden Age (2009).  He was a close friend of Phillips Brooks. See Correspondents.

Garrisons:  Francis Jackson Garrison. See Correspondents.

Theodore ...a ramping Princess: Theodore Jewett Eastman and a family horse. See Correspondents.

Between Mass & Vespers:  Jewett's "Between Mass and Vespers" appeared in Scribner's Magazine (13:661-676), May 1893.
    The special May 1893 "Exhibition Number" of Scribner's Magazine was designed as the "Conductors' Point of View" column said, as a "representative number of an American magazine . . . [showing] to what these popular mediums of literary and artistic enjoyment and information have grown." Contributors to this number include George Washington (by means of a document), William Dean Howells, Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Bret Harte, Walter Besant, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Robert Blum, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Jewett's story, "Between Mass and Vespers," Francisque Sarcey, and George Washington Cable. Among the popular illustrators to appear were Robert Blum, A. B. Frost, and Howard Pyle. 

Seddy:  A Jewett nickname. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in the Jewett Family Papers MS014.02.01.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Dresel


     February 7, [1893]

     Dear Loulie:

     I take up my pen without premeditation to say how much I like my barberries. The calendar 'does' even better for February than for January but I couldn't begin to say why. I am much at my desk these days -- my eyes still trouble me but I find it easier to write than to read, and certain sketches have the advantage. Yesterday I finished the better part of a perfectly new one, which is to be told you when I see you again{;} it has such a funny little plot, or no plot,1 just which you please to say. It has no name yet, which is sad and strange -- usually I know the name when I don't know anything else!

     Somehow I enjoyed my last visit to Charles St. very much. I have been thinking about it a good deal today because I was writing to two friends at a distance. The shock and sorrow of Mr. Brooks's2 death only had the effect of inspiring everybody in a wonderful way. I find that this is too great a thing to write about in one short letter. I should rather talk about it when I come and we find a quiet time, but it seemed to make a new Boston, him going, it was a lovely trail of light that he left behind like a greater sort of sunset that somehow turned at once into dawn.

     I hope things are going well with you dear Loulie and that your mother is much better.

     Yours with love & affection,

     S. O. J.
 

Notes

     1 "A Lonely Worker," Far and Near, III (April 1893), 109-110.

     2Phillips Brooks (1835-1893), rector of Trinity Church in Boston and Bishop of Massachusetts, died January 23, 1893. On February 12 Jewett utilized the same sunset-dawn metaphor in a detailed account of the funeral to Mrs. George D. Howe (Fields, Letters, 108). Jewett's unsigned sketch. "At the Funeral of Phillips Brooks," appeared in The Contributors' Club, Atlantic Monthly, LXXI (April 1893), 566-567.

  The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Louisa Dresel


     [South Berwick, Maine]
     Sunday morning
     [February 12, 1893]

     Dear Loulie:

     I am going to Worcester to spend tomorrow night and the next day to Cambridge to luncheon, and Wednesday and Thursday I shall be busy with Mrs. Hart's talk at the Studio.1  That is as far ahead as I can see now! But perhaps we shall find time for a passing word, on Wednesday, say; though I don't know that I can promise to be at home. I would if I could! but if you are going by, do stop to see if I am here, and forgive if I am not.

     Dr. Holmes was seriously ill a while ago but is slowly getting better.2 Mrs. Fields sees him often now but I think that he doesn't try to see people usually yet.

     I thought you would like Ships That Pass in the Night. I should really like to read it again myself. I hear that the young author is fatally ill. I wonder if it is true. She is an English girl. I mean really young which is surprising when one thinks of certain things in the book.3

     Am glad that you are busy, Miss Dresel, it is a very good thing. I suffer the misfortune of the idle in these days -- with my eyes chiefly, but I hope soon for better things. This means that I am busy enough but not doing the things I wish to do most.

     Yours affectionately,

     S. O. J.
 

Cary's Notes

     1This is almost certainly the studio of Sarah Wyman Whitman,* where she designed stained glass windows and where she entertained at parties that were "occasions." John E. Frost says the intellectual interests of this group were so diverse that one cannot necessarily assume Mrs. Hart's talk was on art.

     2Oliver Wendell Holmes lived to October 7, 1894.

     3Beatrice Harraden (1864-1936), a proponent of women's rights, wrote a score of other books but none that approached the popular success of this novel, which went into at least eleven editions before the year was out, and sold over a million copies. Jewett's curiosity about her fatal illness is ironic in that she outlived Sarah by twenty-seven years.


Editor's Notes

Mrs. Hart:  This probably is Mrs. Alice Marion Rowland Hart (1848-1831), who with her husband, Ernest Abraham Hart (1835-1898), British surgeon and editor of the British Medical Journal, was a collector of Japanese and oriental art.  The author of Picturesque Burma, Past & Present (1897) and other books, she regularly visited and lectured in the United States, including in early 1893, when she visited Chicago "to obtain from the directors of the World's Fair a concession for a typical Irish village on the grounds" (The Toronto Daily Mail,  21 January 1893, p. 13).

studio of Sarah Wyman Whitman:  In A Studio of Her Own (MFA: Boston, 2001), Erica E. Hirshler says that after 1892, Whitman maintained the Lily Glass Works at 184 Boyston St., near Park Square, about half a mile from the Fields house at 148 Charles St. (p. 39). See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College. 




SOJ to Alice Greenwood (Mrs. George D.) Howe


          South Berwick, 12 February, 1893.

     My dear Alice, -- It seems a very long time since I wrote to you, but these have been the chief reasons: two bothering eyes that won't always go when I most wish them to, and the following achievements of my pen mentioned in order and by name!

          "The Flight of Betsey Lane,"
          "Between Mass and Vespers,"
          "All My Sad Captains,"
          "A Day in June,"
          "A Second Spring,"
          and "A Lonely Worker,"*

besides two or three short little things to give away, of a dozen pages of writing each all bran-fire new except the "Sad Captains," which I had written through before I went away, and have now done ever so much more work upon! Look at that for a combination of Idleness and a New England Conscience!

     But if I haven't written, there have been few days when I haven't thought of you pretty often. I acknowledge to a pang of wistful homesickness when you first wrote from the Bristol, -- you can't think how I love the thought of my weeks there in spite of illness and sorrow and everything. I wish I could go to the Pincio with you, and wait in the sunshine until twelve o'clock, to hear all the bells, -- to see the great brimming fountains as I come away, -- to be with you, to lose Beppi# behind the hedge and find him again, about twenty feet away, and to see the roofs of Rome! How one keeps and loves a morning like that last morning! . . . Do you bless yourself a-going into the Sacristy at St. Peter's, and ever think of me a-seeing the lovely Forlis. That was a great morning, and I was just trying to remember how that mosaic of lilies went together in the chapel pavement. Don't you know we thought that S. W.* could do it in glass and you were going to sketch it out for her? I always wish that you had been with us that afternoon, when we went to St. Onofrio.* It was the dearest, most revealing place to me. I suddenly understood, as I never had before, just why persons could make themselves quiet and solitary nests in such places, and never wish to go out into the busy world again. I love St. Onofrio better than any little church in Rome, and there's the truth. I should have to look off and see hills and mountains, whatever my meetin' privileges might be! which comes of being brought up a Maine borderer.

     So you have been cold? It has been freezing here; the longest stretch of very cold weather that I have known for years. I have been here most of the time, but going to town every two or three weeks, and last time I stayed ten days, a great visit if you please. Everybody felt Mr. Brooks's death tremendously.* I have never seen anything like the effect upon the city the day of the funeral -- the hush, the more than Sunday-like stop; the mighty mourning crowd about the church, and in the church a scene that thrills me now, as I think of it. The light kept coming and going, -- it was a spring-like day, with a sky full of shining white clouds, and on all the plain black hangings S. W. had made them put great laurel wreath, with a magnificent one of red carnations and green on the front of the pulpit, that was like a victor's trophy. When the coffin came up the aisle, carried shoulder high by those tall young men, the row of grave young faces, the white lilies and the purple pall! -- it was like some old Greek festival and the Christian service joined together. The great hymn as they went out again -- "For all thy saints who from their labours rest";* the people beginning it as if with a burst of triumph, and the voices stopping and stopping, until hardly anybody was left to sing at all, and all the people standing and crying as if their hearts would break -- you can't imagine what it was! But nothing has ever been such an inspiration, -- it has been like a great sunset that suddenly turned itself into dawn.

     Yours most lovingly.

Fields's note

# a little dog

Notes

"A Lonely Worker": Jewett's stories appeared in print as follows: "The Flight of Betsey Lane," Scribner's September 1893, "Between Mass and Vespers," Scribner's May 1893, "All My Sad Captains," Century September 1894, "A Day in June," probably renamed "The First Sunday in June," Independent, November 1897, "A Second Spring," Harper's December 1893, and "A Lonely Worker," Far and Near April 1893.
    In a later letter, Jewett says there were four short pieces written to give away.  These likely included an essay to benefit The Women's Rest Tour Association and her sketches "Mrs. Osgood of Bar Mills" and "A Word from a Neighbor."  See Chronological List of the Works of Sarah Orne Jewett.

Pincio ... St. Peter's ... Forlis ... St. Onofrio: All are sites in Rome. The Pincio is a large public garden on the Pincian hill, dating from the first century. St. Peter's in the Vatican City is the central cathedral of Roman Catholicism. At the Vatican and the Quirinal Palace are frescos by Melozzo da Forli (1438-1494). The church and monastery of St. Onofrio are just southeast of the Vatican City.

S. W.:  Sarah Wyman Whitman.  See Correspondents.

Mr. Brooks's death: Phillips Brooks (1835-1893) became rector of Trinity Church in Boston and became Bishop of Massachusetts. He died on 23 January 1893. Jewett's "At the Funeral of Phillips Brooks" appeared unsigned in Atlantic Monthly (71:566-567) in April 1893.  His funeral took place on January 26.

"For all thy saints who from their labours rest": This line is from the first stanza of a funeral hymn entitled "Hymn" (1864) by William Walsham How (1823-1897).

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to 
Louisa Loring Dresel

Monday [late winter 1893]

Dear Loulie

Thank you so much for letting me see this delightful letter -- I thank you for your own letter.  I haven't ten stories but I have finished five this winter beside four short papers which I have bestowed upon needy editors! of deserving small publications. = We ought to have a variety-show & call in friends, I am writing this right in the middle of a busy morning with my little desk-mill so cluttered that I dont get room to think! much less to grind!

Yours affectionately

S. O. J

I saw what a nice time the little Woodburys* were having -- dont think I didn't! -- Do you remember San Onofrio* -- its it is such a dear place.


Notes

1893:  This is a plausible date for this letter.  As the note below indicates, Jewett had visited Italy the year before and, during 1893, wrote another letter in late winter in which she mentioned St. Onofrio.  This guess is supported by the quantity of material Jewett published during 1893, her most productive year for short fiction and essays between 1892 and her death.
     1893: 9 essays and 6 stories and sketches.
     1895: 2 essays, 1 poem, and 9 stories and sketches.
The four pieces she gave away likely included an essay to benefit The Women's Rest Tour Association and her sketches "Mrs. Osgood of Bar Mills" and "A Word from a Neighbor."  See Chronological List of the Works of Sarah Orne Jewett.

little Woodburys:  Dresel wrote to Jewett on 11 April 1892, when Jewett was in Rome, about visiting "your little Woodberrys," clearly meaning Charles H. and Marcia Oakes Woodbury.  The couple was married in 1890; their son, David, was born in 1895.

OnofrioWikipedia says: "Sant' Onofrio al Gianicolo is a titular church in Trastevere, Rome. It is the official church of the papal order of knighthood Order of the Holy Sepulchre." Jewett  also mentions it in a 12 February 1893 letter to Alice Greenwood (Mrs. George D.) Howe.  Jewett traveled in Italy in 1892.  She seems particularly attracted to monastic life in part because she is frustrated by distractions that take her away from her writing at this productive period on her career.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Frederick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ


March 6, 1893.

     I think sometimes that I have no right to have dear friends who love me, for this strenuous life allows so little space for the acts or even the words of love. Work and incessant demands, together with the maintenance of habitual responsibilities and cares, preclude simple free action and make me seem a niggard.


Note

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



SOJ to Richard Henry Dana III


[Top of page 1 in another hand: Bought by H. W. L. Dana,* May 17, 1934, Anderson Galleries.
     Top right corner of page 1 is a P inside a semi-circle]

7 March 1893




[Begin letterhead]

South Berwick.
    Maine.

[End letterhead]

  Dear Mr. [M r ?] Dana

      I have heard some things that interested me very much about Dean Lawrence's sermon about Bishop Brooks.*  I wonder if you could tell me how to get a copy, as I think it was not published, but only printed; perhaps, if you have one of your own you would be so kind as to lend it to me?

[ Page 2 ]

I should thank you very much.  I am very eager to have the help and pleasure of reading such a beautiful record and tribute as I know it must be --

    Please give my love to Mrs. [M rs ?] Dana and the children.*  I suppose that you are already busy with your summer plans?  When I see you again I wish so much to know which summer school, or camp, it is to which you are sending Dick and Harry --

Yours ever sincerely
Sarah O. Jewett


[Bottom right corner of page 2 in another hand:  LONG 18653]


Notes

H. W. L. Dana: Richard Henry Dana III (1851 - 1931), was a lawyer and civil service reformer. The son of the author, Richard Henry Dana, Jr. (1815-1882), he married in 1878, Edith Longfellow (1853 - 1915), a daughter of poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882). The first two of their six children were Richard "Dick" Henry Dana IV (1879-1933) and Henry "Harry" Wadsworth Longfellow Dana (1881-1950).
    See Longfellow.org, "Family of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow." 
    It seems likely that "Harry" purchased this letter at the Anderson Galleries of Park Ave. and 59th St. in New York City, a dealer in art and memorabilia, 1887-1934.  Christine Wirth, Archives Specialist at Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters says: "This letter was part of a 1934 auction of the estate of Helen Mumford Dana, Richard Henry Dana's second wife, and his widow. The Jewett letter is one of a number of pieces that HWLD (Harry Dana), purchased from that auction. Harry was in the habit of purchasing from dealers and at auction when he felt something was related to the Longfellow House's collections. The letter is part of a small collection Harry called 'Miscellaneous Famous People.'"

Dean Lawrence's sermon about Bishop Brooks: William Lawrence (1850 - 1941) "was elected as the 7th Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts (1893 - 1927). Lawrence was the son of the notable textile industrialist Amos Adams Lawrence and a member of the influential Boston family, founded by his great-grandfather and American revolutionary, Samuel Lawrence."  Wikipedia
    Prior to succeeding Phillips Brooks (December 13, 1835 - January 23, 1893) as Bishop of Massachusetts on 5 October 1893, Lawrence was Dean of the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, MA (1888 - 1893). 
    Dean Lawrence delivered his Phillips Brooks Memorial Sermon at the Episcopal Theological School, in St. John's Memorial Chapel, on 29 January 1893.
    Richard Dana was the right person for Jewett to ask for a copy, for he served on the chapel's Executive Committee, which arranged for the printing of this sermon.

Mrs. Dana and the children ... Dick and Harry:  See first note above. Jewett may be interested in summer camp because her nephew, Theodore Eastman, is the same age as Dick Dana.  She and Theodore's mother, Carrie, may have been thinking about summer plans for Theodore, whose father had died in March 1892.

The manuscript of this letter is held in the archives of Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters NHS; Correspondence of Sarah Orne Jewett.  HWLD-B139-F94 1893-03-01 Sarah Orne Jewett to RHD III 001.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Samuel Thomas Pickard


South Berwick

10 March [1893]*

Dear Mr. Pickard

            I should be very glad if you could use this personal sketch in the Transcript among your sketches & stories.  This would make me a Contributor which would give me pleasure and I think that I have said or tried to say of our friend is good for all us Maine people to remember.

With best regards believe me.

Yours sincerely

Sarah O. Jewett

 


Notes

1893:  As Pickard was editor of the Portland (ME) Transcript, it would appear that Jewett has sent him a sketch for publication.  The phrase "our friend" strongly suggests their mutual friend and Pickard's relative by marriage, John Greenleaf Whittier.  However, the only personal sketch Jewett is known to have published in the Portland Transcript is "Mrs. Osgood of Bar Mills"  (56:51), March 22, 1893. Almost certainly, then, this letter accompanied a copy of that sketch.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Dresel


     South Berwick, Maine
     Friday night
     March 10, [1893]

     Dear Loulie:

     If it were not for the encouraging little final assurance in your letter, I might feel too severely commented upon and convicted to make such a speedy reply, but I feel like writing. I have been ast {asked} to take tea with a friend and neighbour and the tea happened to be coffee so that at the end of a long day of writing and 'works and ways'* I am {not} now in such a hurry as usual to get to my bed. I am not buried in a snowdrift at all nor do I clasp unfinished manuscripts to my breast as you prettily imagine -- the trouble is that I fail to like them well enough, but I am getting to the end of this spin of writing1 and must turn to other things. I was very tired when I went to Baltimore2 but I got quite refreshed, it was just the time for Mrs. Fields* and me to go away, and we had some delightful pleasures.

     About Deephaven: it was as you imagine about the House of H. M. & Co.* -- and although I had not read Deephaven for a good while I felt as if I had come to be the writer's grandmother. I liked it better than I expected. It is the girlishness in it that gives it value, but I must be thinking about a new preface -- which will say a few things to the modern reader!3 It is curious to find how certain conditions under which I wrote it are already outgrown. The best thing that can be done for the inhabitants of a State, says Plato, is to make them acquainted with each other4 -- and my little story was written (in the main) by a girl not much past twenty, who nevertheless could see that city people who were beginning to pour themselves into the country for the summer, had very little understanding of country people. It is very different now, isn't it? I wish I could write such a preface as George Sand used to write for her country sketches!5

     It is nice to think of your going on at the art school.* I do not forget that I have not seen your sketches yet, but I get very few free days somehow or other. Therefore I hope it is going to be otherwise before very long. I have to be in town next week on all sorts of business. It is too bad that Mrs. Dresel's eyes trouble her. I know how to pity her, indeed I do! Give my love to her, and say as --

     Yours always affectionately,

     S. O. J.

     I am so sorry too about your throat. You had better ask Dr. Morton* to make you live upon a queer brown bread and little biscuits that she recommended to me. I have great faith in them, if your throats are a kind of rheumatism!
 

Cary's Notes
 
     1The year 1893 was among Jewett's most prolific. Publications which may be presumed to have come out of this period are: a biographical sketch, a sociological essay, text for a series of portraits, and five short stories. Corroboration lies in this sentence from a letter, undated but otherwise identifiable as written in the winter of 1892 [or perhaps 1893]: "I haven't ten stories but I have finished five this winter beside four short papers which I have bestowed upon needy editors! or deserving small publications. The five stories are "Between Mass and Vespers," "Peach-tree Joe," "The Flight of Betsey Lane," "The Hiltons' Holiday," and "A Second Spring." The deserving small publications: a pamphlet of The Women's Rest Tour Association, The Artful Dodger, The Portland Transcript and Far and Near.

     2Jewett and Fields visited Baltimore at this time as guests of Mary Elizabeth Garrett.*

     3Jewett's first book, Deephaven, originally published in 1877 by James R. Osgood & Co., was re-issued by the Riverside Press in 1894 in a Large Paper Edition limited to 250 numbered copies, illustrated by Charles and Marcia Woodbury; also simultaneously in a smaller format by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. The preface provided by Jewett for this edition contains close paraphrases of the sentiments in this letter on city-country relationships. It is dated October 1893.

     4Jewett made multiple references to this aphorism: in letters to Frederick M. Hopkins, May 22, 1893 (Richard Cary, Sarah Orne Jewett Letters [Waterville, Me., 1967], 83-84), to Samuel Thurber, May 9, 1906 (Ibid., 164), to Elizabeth McCracken, December 28, 1907 (Fields, Letters, 228). and in the Preface to Deephaven, 1894.

     5In her Preface to the second edition of Deephaven (1894) Jewett cites George Sand's "delightful preface for Légendes Rustiques" (Paris, 1858, 1888), and quotes two sentences from the French text.


Editor's Notes

works and ways:  In her letters, Jewett several times repeats this phrase, sometimes within quotation marks.  The actual phrase does not appear, as one might expect, in the King James Bible, though it is suggested in several places: Psalms 145:17, Daniel 4:37, and Revelations 15:3.  In each of these passages, the biblical author refers to the works and ways of God.  Jewett may be quoting from another source or from commentary on these passages, which tend to emphasize that while God's ways are mysterious, they also are to be accepted humbly by humanity.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

H. M. & Co:  Jewett's publisher, Houghton, Mifflin, and Company.

the art school:  Which art school and in what capacity are not yet known.  Information is welcome.

Dr. Morton:  Cary identifies Dr. Morton: Dr. Helen Morton (d. March 12, 1916) had offices successively on Marlboro, Boylston, and Chestnut streets in Boston. Jewett once characterized her as "touchy {touching?} in her doctorly heart and more devoted in her private capacity as a friend."

Baltimore:  For an account of Jewett and Fields in Baltimore in March 1893, see New York Times, 5 March 1893, p. 11.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

[ March 10, 1893 ]

     And more sad news. Dear old Dr. Peabody gone, too!* but let us be thankful that he could enjoy life so long and so late. Everybody remembers him here with such love and gratitude, for the charming address that he made two years ago. How many of the little New England towns have such pleasant memory!

     Don't you remember that somebody, while we were away, -- oh, it was Mr. Alden, told us how exquisite William Watson's "A Prince's Quest" was? Last night, after I came from my tea-party, I read most of it with great delight. I wish that we could read many of the poems together, but I still cling to my first love, the Dedication to James Bromley.* This is Saturday again, and I suppose you will have your dozen of pleasant people come in. I love the Saturday companies dearly.

Notes

old Dr. Peabody gone: Andrew Preston Peabody (1811-10 March 1893), pastor of South Parish Unitarian Church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, then a professor and acting president of Harvard University. He was editor of the North American Review, 1853-1863.   The address to which Jewett refers is likely to be the prayer he gave for the centennial celebration of the Berwick Academy in July 1891, which appears in the memorial booklet Jewett prepared, pp. 1-2.

Mr. Alden, told us how exquisite William Watson's "A Prince's Quest" ... the Dedication to James Bromley: Henry Mills Alden (1836-1919), editor of Harper's Magazine (1869-1919) probably refers to Sir William Watson (1858-1935), author of The Prince's Quest and Other Poems (1880) and verses on the death of Tennyson, Lachrymae musarum (1902). Watson's "To James Bromley" appears in Wordsworth's Grave & Other Poems (1890), p. 7.  Though there was more than one prominent James Bromley who was contemporary with Wordsworth and to whom Watson's poem may have been addressed, the more likely person seems to be James Bromley (1800 - 1838), an English mezzotint-engraver, who produced a well-known portrait of William Wordsworth in the National Portrait Gallery.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ


Easter Monday, 1893. [April 3]

    Easter went as Easter must, well;* for is it not a day of the future? . . . Your letters . . . have been comfort and joy to me, and I count and know them every one, and need them; if indeed one dares say one needs anything.


Notes

Easter: Celebration of the resurrection of Christ in Christian cultures, in western Christianity falling on the first Sunday after the first full moon after 21 March.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



Henry Drummond to SOJ

[This letter is on a printed letterhead that includes a seal upper left containing this information: The Brunswick, Copley Square, Boston, Barnes & Dunklee.  Upper right is this information:  P. O. Address, The Brunswick, Back Bay, Boston.]


April. 9. 1983.

Dear Madam,

    Can you excuse this long silence?  Unhappily I could not till now and see my way to avail myself of the pleasure you offer me, but I now write to say that the obstacle has been removed, and I shall be delighted to come this evening.  With many thanks for your kindness.

Yours Sincerely,

Henry Drummond*
 
Notes

Drummond:  In April 893  Henry Drummond delivered the Lowell Lectures at Boston.  See The Evolution of Man, being the Lowell lectures delivered at Boston, Mass., Apr., 1893, by Professor Henry Drummond, edited by William Templeton.

The manuscript of this letter fragment is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University: bMS Am 1743 (51).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett and Carrie Jewett Eastman



Wednesday morning

[ April 12, 1893 ]*

Dear Girls

    I send these Chicago letters to make up for any lack in mine.  Sister was let sleep this morning and is more belated than usual! -- The little Dike's* letter was to S. Coolidge*.  I send this note of Mr. Drummond's* just for you to see so please send it back when

[ Page 2 ]

you write again.  I am going to "big Houghton's"* this morning and if I can find some tumblers I [shall written over something] send them down.  Other things were desired and I being in the neighborhood proffered services.  This card from Alice* sounds very well.  I dare say her rheumatic attack was the kind like Seeger's* -- to leave her better

[ Page 3 ]

than it found her, but think of her going to Chicago!  I am so glad.  I met with no adventures on my journey -- but now I must fly.

Yours
Seddy

I hope to get the curtains from [unrecognized word].


Notes

April 12, 1893: This date is based upon Jewett's having just received Henry Drummond's April 9, 1893 letter accepting her invitation to the home of Annie Fields.  See notes below.

little Dike's
:  No Jewett acquaintance of this name is known.  Assistance is welcome.

S. Coolidge:  See Sarah Chauncey Woolsey in Correspondents.

Mr. Drummond:  Henry Drummond.  See Correspondents.

"big Houghton":  Probably Houghton and Dutton Company on Boston's Tremont Street, a popular large, multi-story department store from the 1870s until the 1930s.

Alice:  The Jewett's had too many friends of this name to allow certain identification in this case.  Main candidates probably would be Alice Greenwood Howe and Alice Longfellow.  See Correspondents.

Seeger's: C. Carroll Hollis says that Seeger probably is Harriet Foot Seeger (b. 1843?), a schoolteacher friend of the Jewetts from Boston.  She may be the daughter of  Adonijah and Clarissa (Woodworth) Foot.

Chicago ... my journey:  According to Richard Cary, Jewett attended the Columbian Exposition with Annie Fields and Susan Coolidge soon after it opened in May 1893.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in the Jewett Family Papers MS014.02.01.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Dresel

     South Berwick, Maine
     Wednesday
     April 26, [1893]

     Dear Loulie:

     I was very sorry to miss you while I was in town and you were very good to come so many times. It was a fortnight or more of great busyness! and I may add, much busyness of pleasure. I stayed on until Saturday expecting to see Madame Duse again but I was disappointed with the rest of the world,1 and while Mrs. Fields went home to see the Saturday friends whom she had designed to run away from, my sister and I went to hear Rearig* and were much diverted and then took the five o'clock train home. The first of the week I made a two days visit with Miss Ticknor2 which has been arranged for some time and much looked forward to. I have usually been to see her in Newport. It seemed so funny to be making a little visit in Boston -- as if I went to stay with a neighbor here!

     Chicago draws near3 and I begin to feel hurried. I am trying to get another story done before I go: it has a delightful motif of affectionate indecision! There was a plain old person who had 3 husbands and one day when she was making up bouquets to put on their graves (she is to have a friend to talk with who dropped in to call) there is one rose that has bloomed on one of her houseplants, and she doesn't know which husband she ought to give it to!! You can see that it is a story with large opportunities and I now leave you to ponder upon it.4

     With love to Mrs. Dresel, I am yours ever most affectionately,

     S. O. J.
 

Cary's Notes

     1Originally scheduled at the Globe Theatre in Boston for "four appearances only" beginning April 11, 1893, Eleanora Duse consented to an additional series, the last performances of which had to be cancelled "owing to [her] continued indisposition."

     2Anna Eliot Ticknor (1823-1896), eldest daughter of the American historian George Ticknor, also consorted with Jewett in the Northeast Harbor-Mt. Desert region on the Maine coast. Miss Ticknor was one of the editors of Life, Letters, and Journals of George Ticknor (Boston, 1876), and sole editor of Life of Joseph Green Cogswell (Cambridge, Mass., 1874).

     3The World's Colombian Exposition, popularly called the Chicago World's Fair, opened May 1 and closed October 30, 1893. Jewett attended the Fair with Annie Fields and Susan Coolidge.

     4 "The Only Rose," Atlantic Monthly, LXXIII (January 1894), 37-46: collected in The Life of Nancy (Boston, 1895). Jewett stayed true to this early conception. Miss Pendexter, "a cheerful, even gay little person who always brought a pleasant flurry of excitement," comes in "from the next house but one to make a friendly call" on the protagonist, Mrs. Bickford.


Editor's Notes

Rearig:  This reference remains obscure.  It is at least possible that Jewett has provided a phonetic spelling for Roehrig, in which case, she may refer to Frederick Louis Otto Roehrig (1819-1908).  He was a German-born professor of languages, particularly Asiatic, at Cornell University.  As a well-known expert on Asian languages and cultures, he may have offered public lectures, but this really is only speculation.  More reliable information on this allusion is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Louisa Dresel

     [South Berwick, Maine]
     Saturday morning
     [April 29, 1893]

     Dear Loulie:

     I take my busiest pen in hand right in the middle of things to thank you for your letter and all it says, and to meekly state my firm belief that a story must stop somewhere, and that the best a person can do is to set her readers to wondering what happened next. To deal with such a figure as Danny Nolan's is to deal with uncertainties and one can do nothing more than take hope, or give it. Perhaps the priest could manage him, but it is the priest whose portrait I try to take: he is the hero not Danny, if I had made Danny assert himself you would have been speaking indeed of greens in my background! I think he and Dennis balance each other and are about equally distinct. I wonder if you won't read it so when you think it over? -- but I suppose they aren't or you would have been impatient to know how Dennis found his wife when he got back after the illustrious absence. You see my sense of composition in this story is clear to me, but alas how difficult it is to write and paint and play.1 I heard an old man who was a charming singer and whose voice was weakening, say, "Oh if I could sing it as well as I think it!" I suppose that it needs the perspective that you get when a thing comes back to you in print to make one feel the possibilities clearly and see what one might do.

     It was lovely about the Sold sketch. I wish I could have seen it. Now I must fly back to my work again.

     Yrs. affectionately,

     S. O. J.
 

Notes
 
     1The story is "Between Mass and Vespers," Scribner's, XIII (May 1893), 661-676; collected in A Native of Winby and Other Tales (Boston, 1893). Danny, an Irish lad in New England, has turned criminal but Father Ryan guides him to regeneration through faith and love.

  The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College. 




SOJ to Louisa Dresel

     Thursday
     May 4 [1893]

     Dear Loulie:

     I think your letter needs an answer -- it is so full of disappointments that I feel quite tenderhearted over you. I can't quite make up my mind that having had a friend buy the sketch, instead of a stranger, is not much more of a tribute! I wish that you would reflect upon the transaction from this point of view! There is great sagacity in the saying about prophets and their honor in their own country. It applies just as well to the prophets' works and ways, and I do think that it is a lovely combination of feelings -- this liking the painter and the picture well enough to take the picture for better or worse! Reflect, Loulie!

     But about the World's Fair, I am very sorry indeed. I still hope that Ellis may change his mind, or that you may go with an aunt or make some happy arrangement. People drop out of the Raymond parties continually,* so why don't you speak for an extra berth and be ready to fly at the last moment if there is one? I am glad to be going early -- the summer looks long and pleasant beyond the Exposition which I expect to enjoy very much.

     And Mamma ill! which is a great pity. What a bleak seven days we have had, and if "the hot week in May" comes directly afterward how we shall all like it and put on our little gingham dresses and think that summer has come!

     I don't quite dare to speak of the story again!! but indeed I wrote in the middle of a tired day and something must have crept into the letter. "The Bogans" had a kind of ideality and typical-ism about it, but perhaps this is as good.1 I can't tell myself, and I don't much care. It is a brick in the little wall, and I think about my wall more than about my bricks for it is my nature to!* Of all these great and little subjects we will speak when next we meet.

     Yours most affectionately,

     S. O. J.
 

Cary's Note

     1Jewett is referring to "Between Mass and Vespers" (see August 29 letter) and "The Luck of the Bogans," Scribner's, V (January 1889), 100-112; collected in Strangers and Wayfarers (Boston, 1890). Both stories depict the moral decline of an Irish youth in America; the earlier ends in ruin, the later in rehabilitation.


Editor's Notes

prophets and their honor in their own country:  See the Bible, Mark 6:4.

a brick in the little wall:  Between 1889 and 1901, Jewett published eight stories about the Irish and Irish immigrants.  Jack Morgan and Louis A. Renza have collected these into a single volume,  The Irish Stories of Sarah Orne Jewett  (Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1996).   In their introduction, they contend that Jewett was successful on the whole at conveying affection for the Irish as a people and in the cultural work she undertook of subverting the "Paddy stereotype" so apparent in much contemporary writing and popular culture.

But about the World's Fair ... Ellis ... the Raymond parties:  Cary points out that the World's Colombian Exposition, popularly called the Chicago World's Fair, opened May 1 and closed October 30, 1893. Jewett attended the Fair with Annie Fields and Susan Coolidge.  Ellis Loring Dresel (1871-1925) is Louisa's brother.  Raymond & Whitcomb, a New York travel agency, provided travel, hotel and tour arrangements for the exposition from various eastern starting points.  As the letter suggests, the amenities included sleeping cars for the journey.  Customers stayed at the Raymond and Whitcomb Grand Hotel in Chicago, which promised convenience, comfort, and pure Wisconsin water. 

  The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

 [May 8, 1893]*

Wednesday night
    South Berwick.
         Maine.

Dear Fuff

         . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mary* is as busy as ten bumble bees with a belated garden, in fact we both are, but I dare say it will all turn out just as well.  My nasturtiums are way up that I planted before we went away.  I wonder if yours are too?  In this weather one wants to fly every way at once.  I have got almost all my work done on Deephaven  --  just now I am busy with a preface for the new edition,* but I am not quite sure how it goes.  I have pretty nearly made up my mind not to try to make a book of stories for this year . . . . . . . . . .

(Pinny)

Notes

The transcriber includes the "May 8" date in brackets. I have determined the year of the letter based on the 1893 publication of the preface Jewett mentions. 
    The ellipses in the transcription indicate that this is a selection from the manuscript.

Fuff: Nickname for Annie Adams Fields.    See Correspondents.

Mary: Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Deephaven ... new edition:  Jewett wrote a new preface for the 1893 re-issue of her first novel, Deephaven (1877).  Though she says here that she probably will not put together a new collection of stories for 1893, in fact she did publish A Native of Winby and Other Stories in 1893.

Pinny: Nickname for Sarah Orne Jewett.    See Correspondents. Why the transcriber put this name in parentheses is unknown.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Frederick Mercer Hopkins 


South Berwick, Maine
     May 22, 1893

    My dear Sir:

     I often keep up this average of writing but while I can keep even to a higher average for a week or so, I am not a steady worker like Mr. Howells,1 for instance, and I am apt to have long spaces between these seasons of writing, when I do hardly any writing at all except many letters, and occasional pages of memoranda. Sometimes I have written sketches of 6000 or 7000 words in a single day.2 Of course that is exceptional, but I am apt to be at work during five or six weeks and then stop, except that I am always thinking about my work.
     This is all I can say about my irregular fashions of getting my sketches done.
     About the other matter -- I certainly never expressed myself in those words about my town friends and neighbours. You know there is a saying of Plato's that the best thing one can do for the people of a State is to make them acquainted with each other, and it was some instinctive feeling of this sort which led me to wish that the town and country people were less suspicious of one another. When I was writing the Deephaven sketches not long after I was twenty and was beginning my Atlantic work,3 it was just the time when people were beginning to come into the country for the summer in such great numbers. It has certainly been a great means of broadening both townsfolk and country folk. I think nothing has done so much for New England in the last decade; it accounts for most of the enlargement and great gain that New England has certainly made, as if there had been a fine scattering or sowing broadcast of both thought and money! But twenty years ago city-people and country-people were a little suspicious of each other -- and, more than that, the only New Englander generally recognized in literature was the caricatured Yankee.
     I tried to follow Mrs. Stowe in those delightful early chapters of The Pearl of Orr's Island4in writing about people of rustic life just as they were. Now there are a great many stories with this intention, but twenty years ago there were hardly any.5 'Human nature is the same the world over' but somehow the caricature of the Yankee, the Irishman, the Frenchman takes its place first, and afterwards comes a more true and sympathetic rendering. This is a most interesting subject, is it not?6
 
     Pardon so long a letter, which I have been obliged to write in great haste, and believe me
     Yours sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

     1 William Dean Howells was one of the most productive of major American authors, turning out over one hundred volumes of fiction, travel, criticism, biography, drama, and poetry, as well as anthologies, introductions, reviews, and editorial commentary.
     2 Miss Jewett's estimates of her output varied. A consensus of several newspaper statements shows that she did write sporadically, as her spirit willed. Ordinarily she worked from immediately following luncheon to suppertime -- sometimes as long as from eleven forenoon to late at night -- but she took frequent holidays from writing. She averaged some 2500 words most days, but as many as 8000 on others, seldom reworking her manuscripts. She might perhaps have rivaled Howells' record had she not applied herself so assiduously to personal correspondence, which she attended to promptly every morning, not uncommonly penning thirty or more letters at a sitting.
     3 Deephaven, Miss Jewett's first published volume, was a collection of regional sketches revised and reprinted from contributions to the Atlantic Monthly from September 1873 to September 1876. [The Plato quotation comes from Book V of "Laws," in which Socrates does not appear: "for there is no greater good in a state than that the citizens should be known to one another." (Research: Jack V. Wales, Jr. of the Thacher School, Ojai, CA.)]
    4 Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) conceived the characters and began to write her oft-interrupted novel The Pearl of Orr's Island (Boston, 1862) while her husband was professor of Biblical literature at Bowdoin College. Miss Jewett read the book when she was thirteen or fourteen years old and was struck by its strength and pungency. Later she classified it as "an incomplete piece of work" and determined to write with greater simplicity and harmony about the lives of coastal and back-country New Englanders.
     Miss Jewett evidently first saw Mrs. Stowe in late summer of 1878. Mrs. Fields, who was on more intimate terms with Mrs. Stowe and eventually wrote her biography, introduced Miss Jewett to her in Hartford in 1884. Miss Jewett subsequently met Mrs. Stowe several times at the Newton country home and Boston town house of Governor and Mrs. William Claflin.
     5 In this interim Mrs. Stowe had been joined in her homely depiction of New England scene and character by Alice Brown, Rose Terry Cooke, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Lucy Larcom, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, all of whom had established themselves in the rapidly growing ranks of American local colorists.
     6 Miss Jewett's concern with this "most interesting subject" was brought to the fore again by her publisher's decision to issue a Holiday Edition of Deephaven, sensitively illustrated by her friends Charles and Marcia Woodbury. The date on the title page is 1894, but the book actually appeared in November 1893.Miss Jewett provided a new preface for it in October 1893, rephrasing many of the sentiments expressed in the latter half of this letter, which seems to have been used as a basis for the preface. See Richard Cary, "Jewett, Tarkington, and the Maine Line," Colby Library Quarterly, IV (February 1956), 89-95; Fields, Letters, 228; and Letter 137in this volume. Miss Jewett sought to effectuate Plato's dictum through her sympathetic Irish-American and French-Canadian stories.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

So. Berwick, Maine

Tuesday morning
[ July 1893 ]


 

Dear Mary

                  ……Do see the lovely picture of Betsy Lane* in Scribners!!

 
Notes

The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

Betsy Lane:  Jewett's "The Flight of Betsey Lane" appeared in Scribner's Magazine (14:213-225), August 1893, illustrated by W. T. Smedley.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to William Hayes Ward

     South Berwick, Maine
     [Summer 1893]

    My dear Mr. Ward:

     I am tempted to send you the enclosed slip from one of our Maine papers because I think that it may give you reason for a little essay in the Sunday Herald. It seems to me that there is such a good chance just now for impressing our architectural lesson upon the public mind! and emphasizing our need for holding fast to whatever we have that is characteristic in our town and state life. The Philadelphia exposition1 gave a new regard for our antiquities (our 'Centennial' chairs and plates!), and, if I am not mistaken, the Chicago exposition will teach us to be more careful about our buildings, both in preserving the old ones and in building after better fashions.2 I think one point that might be made is that nothing wins more praise and admiration at the World's Fair than the Hancock House,* and though those who destroyed it thought they were building finer houses in its stead, the day has come when to live in the Hancock House itself would be the most charming distinction, and so there is a subtle revenge brought about by time!
     Forgive my writing such a long letter and forgive my suggestions about your writing on these points, but indeed I feel very grateful to you and -- is it not? -- your daughter3 for the thoughtful little papers which have had so much influence upon our New England life. They have been a most refining force in our smaller towns and quieter neighbourhoods, and many persons who can never thank you or even know whom they should thank are wiser and broader in thought for what you have said.
     I hope that you -- and the Herald generally -- will not let drop the Sunday question at Chicago.4 Last week when I was there* I wondered if the Secretary of the Christian Endeavor Society knew what he was railing at. It seemed to me that he himself would be better and more intent upon growth, and helpfulness to others even, if he could spend a few hours among those wonderful buildings. It is certainly remote from anything trivial or degrading, that great enclosure whose gates he would bar to those who need the sight of it most. I could not help thinking as I stood with tears in my eyes before the Statue of Lincoln in Lincoln Park this very last Sunday and saw the people scattered all about, that anything was better than they should have been at home in their little houses, drowsing and chattering or spying their neighbours. I think as you do, that reverence and worship and serious thought are more likely to exist when Sunday afternoon at least is given wider outlooks and new experiences of nature and art, "the great revealer." And if people are going to dress for going out in the afternoon they are twice as likely to be in trim to go to church in the morning! And at Chicago nobody can see the great sights of that Exposition -- the great buildings and bridges and columns -- without being proud of his country, which is in itself one of the best things in the world.
     I have been wishing to see you to give you a message of kind remembrance which Mr. Arnold's daughter, Mrs. Wodehouse, gave me last Autumn for you. She spoke of her father's warm feeling for you and wished me to say that she and Mrs. Arnold remembered you most kindly. Mrs. Fields and I were visiting Mrs. Arnold. It was a most delightful thing to me to go into our friend's quiet study which they have kept as he left it.5
 
     Believe me with great regard
     Yours sincerely,
     Sarah O. Jewett


Cary's Notes

     1 The Centennial Exposition of 1876 (see Letter 8, note 3).
     2 Miss Jewett proved a good prophet. The Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago changed the trend of architecture in the United States and brought about a renaissance of classic styles.
     3 Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward (1844-1911), author of numerous biographies and Biblical romances, notably The Gates Ajar, married Ward's son in 1888. With common sense and a touch of humor, she frequently depicted the mores and amenities, the heroes and misfits of New England culture in the pages of the Independent.
    4 For several weeks before and after the opening of the Columbian Exposition, the Boston Herald reported almost daily the controversy between politicians and sabbatarians as to whether the Fair should be open Sundays. Interest in the decision mounted as contradictory information reached the public. On May 4, 1893, the Herald stated: "Gates likely to be opened next Lord's Day"; on May 5, "Gates to be open -- World's Fair won't close Sundays"; on May 6, "Exposition will not be open next Sunday." The question was resolved by May 13: "Gates to be open every day after May 21st." For three years beginning January 8, 1891, the Independent kept up a running fire of commentary regarding Sunday operation of the Fair, highlighting the issue on April 23, 1891, with a nine-page symposium by representative clergymen of several sects.
     5 During his grand lecture tour of the United States, October 1883-March 1884, Matthew Arnold stayed for some time at Mrs. Fields's home in Boston. Miss Jewett met him there and cherished the memory of his sitting by the fire one evening, reading aloud "The Scholar Gipsy." Arnold died in 1888.
     In 1899 Arnold's daughter Eleanor married the Honorable Armine Wodehouse, an under-secretary in the British Foreign Office.


Editor's notes

Summer 1893:  Richard Cary dates this letter on May 2, 1893.  He also provides the May 4, 1893 date to a letter to Louisa Dresel, above, in which Jewett implies that she has not yet been to the Columbian Exposition.  Later in the letter, Jewett indicates that she has visited the fair the previous week.  Jewett could not have reported on public reaction to the exposition until well after May 1, when it opened to the public.
    While it seems clear that the letter was composed during the Columbian Exposition (May 1 - October 30, 1893). it is unlikely that it was mailed the day after the opening.
    Note that Paula Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett (p. 265) reports that Jewett and a number of her friends attended the fair together in April 1893; this appears to be impossible, as the fair had not yet opened to the public.
    Rita Gollin in Annie Adams Fields (2002, p. 236) says that Madame Blanc attended the Columbian Exposition with Jewett, Fields and others.  Blanchard reports that Blanc stayed at the Fields house in Boston during November - December 1893 (pp. 266-8). This would suggest that Jewett and Fields would have attended the fair with Madame Blanc shortly before her stay in Boston, perhaps in October of 1893.  However, so far no corroboration has appeared to show that Fields, Jewett and Blanc traveled together to the fair or were there at the same time.

Hancock House:  John Hancock (1737-93) was the first signer of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. In 1775-7, as presiding officer of the Second Continental Congress, he was called President Hancock. He chaired the Marine Committee during the American Revolution, and he was the first governor of Maine (then part of Massachusetts) under the Constitution of the Commonwealth (1780-1785).  He also signed the incorporation papers for the Berwick Academy.  (Research assistance: Wendy Pirsig.)
    The John Hancock Manor in Boston was demolished in the summer of 1863, its loss stimulating the historic preservation movement, which Jewett supported, particularly in her activities on behalf of the Hamilton House in South Berwick at the end of the 19th century.
    According to The Official Guide to the World's Columbian Exposition, (1893, pp. 156-7), the Maine building was modeled after the Hancock Manor, and was known as "Hancock House."

Christian Endeavor Society:  "The International Society of Christian Endeavor, original name United Society Of Christian Endeavor, interdenominational organization for Protestant youth in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. It was founded in 1881 by Francis Edward Clark, who served as president until 1927."  Britannica
   "Dr. John Willis Baer (March 2, 1861 -  February 8, 1931) was an American official of the United Society of Christian Endeavor. President of Occidental College in Los Angeles (then a Presbyterian school) from 1906 to 1916.[2] In 1919 was elected Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America."  Baer was General Secretary of the Society in 1893.  Wikipiedia

"the great revealer":  By putting this phrase in quotation marks, Jewett suggests that she is alluding to another text.  Which text that might be is not clear, for it was used by number of 19th-century writers, making cases that art or nature or scripture is the main source of the spiritual truths that humanity seeks.  Perhaps Jewett drew the phrase from Phillips Brooks, who uses it to refer to Christ in his sermon , "The Glory of Simplicity," collected in Sermons: New Starts in Life, and other Sermons (1910, p. 166).

visiting Mrs. Arnold:  Jewett and Annie Adams Fields traveled in Europe for several months in the summer and autumn of 1892.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Additions to the notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Alice Morse Earle
Manchester, Massachusetts
18 August 1893

[ Begin letterhead, which has been lined through ]

South Berwick, Maine

[End letterhead ]

My dear Miss Earle

    I thank you for your most friendly note and hasten to do what you ask.  I send a copy of A Marsh Island* because I happen to have it at hand and to be in the region of Country which first suggested it.  I shall be looking

[ Page 2  ]

out of all the windows for my copy of the Sabbath in Puritan New England.*  I have taken so much pleasure in what you have written that it pleases me very much to have you think this a fair exchange and no robbery.

Believe me always
Yours most sincerely

Sarah O. Jewett

[ Page 3  ]

Forgive me if I am wrong in directing my cover -- I always hear your name spoken -- like authors names generally !. [So the punctuation appears ] without any prefix at all, and so I may be quite wrong in thinking of you as Miss Earle when I come to write my first note.


Notes

A Marsh Island:  Jewett's 1884 novel.

Sabbath in Puritan New England:  Jewett underlined only "in" and "Eng," but seems to have intended to indicate underlining of the whole title of Earle's 1891 title.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA in Sarah Orne Jewett Papers, Misc. mss. boxes “J.”  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller. Coe College.



Alice Morse Earle to SOJ
    of 18 August 1893

[Penciled into upper right corner of page 1, probably in another hand:  1893]

[Letterhead "coat of arms" design with motto in a banner: ]
 IN DEO NON ARMIS FIDO*

My dear Miss ^[Sarah inserted in pencil, in another hand]^ Jewett

    Your book* and letter arrived safely -- and have given me much pleasure{,}  I am such an amateur at authorship -- that any words of praise from a "really and truly" author are very sweet to me.  I hope you will find a few

[circled 1 in left lower margin]

[ Page 4 ]*

pages of interest in my book* which I send to you by this mail.  I thank you most sincerely for your compliance with my request --

    Most cordially yours
Alice Morse Earle
 
August 18th 1893.
I must tell you that I am a married dame not a spinster -- no longer young -- fat not fair and almost forty -- with three children living -- and that I know just how you look [too ?] for your friends have told me -- at Chicago.*


Notes

IN DEO NON ARMIS FIDO:  Latin: "In God, not arms, I trust."  According to Yale University's Morse College website, this is the Samuel F. B. Morse family motto.  Alice Morse apparently was kin to the painter and inventor of the telegraph.  The coat of arms design for the college and that of the letterhead are similar in the use of a battle axe image.

Your book:  Jewett's letter to Earle of the same date indicates that she sent Earle a copy of A Marsh Island (1884).

Page 4:   Between the first and final page of this letter, as held in the Houghton, is inserted a folded letter sheet; on the inside left leaf at the bottom, penciled in another hand is: "Taken from Home Life in colonial days. Alice Morse Earle."
    Home Life in Colonial Days was published in 1898.

my book:  Earle could have sent Jewett one of her first three books: The Sabbath in Puritan New England (1891), China Collecting in America (1892), Customs and Fashions in Old New England (1893).  However, Jewett's letter to Earle of the same date indicates that she is looking forward to a copy of The Sabbath in Puritan New England.

at Chicago:  Earle and Jewett both attended the the World Columbian Exposition, the Chicago World's Fair of 1893, though apparently not at the same time.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University: Sarah Orne Jewett  correspondence, 1861-1930, MS Am 1743, (55) Earle, Alice Morse. 2 letters; [1893] - 1896.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Samuel Sidney McClure

Spring House. Richfield N, Y
 28 August [1893]1

Dear Mr. McClure --

Thank you for your kind note. I think you must put me down in a kind of general way in your prospectus for I must not make and [any?]distinct promises this long time of yet.  If I wish to go on properly with my work by and by. But you must use my name if you think it will aid you, for I surely wish to be of aid and later I shall no doubt have many things to say --  I was sorry that the Rose story was too long -- 2 I was afraid it would be and it is not fit for a serial -- yet I wanted you to have something of mine -- We will both have patience! And you must believe me

Yours faithfully

S. O. Jewett

I have asked Mrs. Fields but she cannot promise to do any work. She gives almost all her time to her charity work you know -- nowadays -- 3 I shall probably be here for several weeks --


Stoddart's Notes

1 From the context of "The Rose story," the date of the letter can be assumed to be 1893.

2 McClure must have rejected "The Only Rose," which appeared in Atlantic Monthly (January 1894).

3 The Associated Charities of Boston.  See Annie Fields in  Correspondents.


Editor's Notes

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott Frederick Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.


SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

CLIFFS*

MANCHESTER-BY-THE-SEA

Cliffs -- Sunday afternoon
[ August - September 1893 ]

Dear O. P.*

            ------------------- Sandpiper* went to the Farms Station* right from the lunch.  She sent her love to you several times and has got a parrot -- something or other she is going to give you to set in a tub of water and grow all over everything.  It was described with deep emotion.  We must go out all of us for a day as soon as I get home.  Jessie* may now be expected toward the end of this week from Newport where she is staying now with Lily Fairchild.*  Then there will be music a-going on, and I shall stay to see her a little while and then come home for a while and then come back again -- there are so many people and things that kindly advantage your sister, and pretty soon I shall have to blow up to begin again like the minister!  they have printed up so many of the things already that I wrote this year.  Betsey* is terribly well speaked of, you may be glad to know.  -------

Sister Sarah

Notes

The hyphens at the beginning and end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

Cliffs:  Alice Greenwood Howe's summer home was "The Cliffs" in Manchester. MA. See Correspondents.

O.P.:  A family nickname for Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents

Sandpiper:  Celia Laighton Thaxter.  See Correspondents

Farms Station: The Beverly Farms station was for Jewett a main train station stop for travel between Boston and such frequently visited Massachusetts towns as Beverly Farms, Prides Crossing and Manchester by the Sea.

Jessie:  Jessie Cochrane. See Correspondents.

Lily Fairchild:  Sally Fairchild's mother, Elizabeth Fairchild.  See Correspondents.

Betsey:  Jewett's "The Flight of Betsey Lane" first appeared in Scribner's Magazine (14:213-225) in August 1893

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Celia Laighton Thaxter to SOJ

Shoals, September 28, 1893. 

    I am pegging away hard on the book,* and I want to ask you lots of things. All you say is so precious, dear. I have got a little plan of the garden, as you suggested, with places of everything marked, -- a sort of little map. I have got the whole thing about done, the writing, but there is much copying and arranging of parts to make a proper unity. I have been so ill since the house closed, just about dead with the stress and bother of things and people, and feared to slip back to the hateful state of three years ago. The doctor said, "You are going to have the whole thing over again if you are not mighty careful," and mighty careful I have been and I am better.

    I loved "The Hiltons' Holiday."* How you have a way of making dear, every-day, simple things, like that, more precious and delightful than all the festivals and theatres and entertainments that ever refreshed the soul of humanity! It is so beautiful to do this in such an exquisite fashion.

 

Notes

the book: An Island Garden (1894).

"The Hilton's Holiday":  "The Hilton's Holiday" appeared first in Century Magazine (24:772-78) in September 1893. It was then collected in The Life of Nancy (1895).

This extract from a letter appears in Letters of Celia Thaxter Edited by her friends, A. F. [Annie Fields] and R. L. [Rose Lamb], The Riverside Press, H. O. Houghton, & Co, Cambridge, Mass. 1895.  Annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Horace E. Scudder

     South Berwick, Maine
     October 16, 1893

    My dear Mr. Scudder:

     I am sorry that I could not get "The Only Rose"1 copied, or make a better looking manuscript myself, but I have had much trouble in using my hand, and I could not give it to some one who can usually do typewriting for me. I hope it is all plain if it is untidy! and that you will like it. I shall be here after this week in case of the proofs being ready. I do not suppose that will be at once. I am to be at Manchester over Sunday, (and at Naushon2 for a few days first). But after that anything may be sent here.

     Yours sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett

     I should have sent a note in answer to yours, which came to Richfield,3 but I expected to see you at 4 Park St.4 on my way home.


Notes

     1Atlantic Monthly, LXXIII (January 1894), 37-46; collected in The Life of Nancy.
    2 Miss Jewett periodically visited the family of John M. Forbes, the railroad builder, who owned this island off the coast of Massachusetts. Emerson's daughter Edith was married to Forbes's son William. The island was a haven for summer and autumn guests who entertained themselves at boating, fishing, riding, and hunting. Miss Jewett relished most the invigorating cruises along the Maine coast in the Forbes majestic sailing yacht Merlin.
    3 Miss Jewett, a lifelong sufferer from rheumatism of limbs and back, usually put up at the Spring House in Richfield Springs, New York, when seeking alleviation of her condition in the local waters. At other times she tried to find relief at Wells Beach and Poland Spring, Maine; at Hot Springs, Virginia; at St. Augustine, Florida; and at Aix-les-Bains, France.
     4 Site of the Quincy mansion that now housed the publishing offices of Houghton Mifflin Company on the first floor and those of the Atlantic Monthly on the second.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.




Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

Chicago, October, 1893.

     Chicago, and this is early of a Thursday morning having arrived over night late, but in good order: and having awaked this morning to find the brightest sunshine and warmth while the Hotel boasts fewer lions and more rocking chairs than we were led to suppose. The party is pretty large and I shall try to lose most of it whenever opportunity offers, and to find it again at hours of meat and drink.
     But after all I shall care really for the main issue, which is to see that great general sight and to wonder and dream.


Notes

Chicago, October, 1893: Whitman is apparently attending the Columbian Exposition.  She received a medal for her work exhibited at this celebration of the 500th anniversary of Columbus's voyage to the Americas.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109. 




Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

October 30, 1893. Studio

     I got very little at Cape Ann in my second day with everything gray and generally discrepant, but I am minded to throw it on a larger canvas and see what can be done with memory and hope, those potent factors of the spirit.


Notes

Cape Ann: A peninsula at the northern end of Massachusetts Bay, where the towns of Gloucester and Beverly Farms are located.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.




SOJ to William Hayes Ward

148 Charles Street,
Friday Morning [October 1893 - April 1894]*

Dear Mr. Ward,
            I shall be very glad to tell you what I can of Madame Blanc 'Th. Bentzon'*  and her coming to Boston, if it will be of service to you or to Miss Ward. I shall be here tomorrow and Sunday -- tomorrow before ten and after two.

Yours ever sincerely,

Sarah O. Jewett

Notes:

October 1893 - April 1894:  According to Paula Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett (1994), Madame Blanc first visited Annie Fields at 148 Charles St. in Boston during November-December 1893 and, after touring elsewhere in the United States, returned for another stay during April 1894 (pp. 266-8).  Rita Gollin in Annie Adams Fields (2002, p. 236) says that Madame Blanc attended the Columbian Exposition with Jewett, Fields and others.  This would imply that Blanc's first stay began before the 30 October closing date of the fair.  However, so far no corroboration has appeared to show that Fields, Jewett and Blanc traveled together to the fair or were there at the same time.

Madame Blanc:  Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc (1840-1907), See Correspondents.
    Blanc and Jewett corresponded for eight years before they met for the first time in Paris in 1892 (see Fields, Letters, 91). In 1893-4 Madame Blanc stayed at Mrs. Fields's Boston home, and in 1897 at Miss Jewett's in South Berwick. In 1898 Mrs. Fields and Miss Jewett spent several weeks at Madame Blanc's country home in La Ferté sous Jouarre.

The manuscript of this letter is held in the Autograph Collection at the Loyola University (Chicago) Archives and Special Collections, item 1469, and may be viewed at Loyola University Chicago Digital Special Collections.  Original transcription by Sarah Morsheimer.  Slightly revised transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

November 14, 1893.

     Then came Edward Cabot's funeral.* Your thoughts and mine are not far from each other's; for this mighty Herald comes on either hand and fills one with hope and with grief both at once. . . . I wish the day might bless you as it did those who stood around Mr. Parkman's grave * last Saturday (the first day of St. Martin's Summer)* with gold and violet and deepest red over all the Earth, and in the Sky - heaven.


Notes

Edward Cabot's funeral: I have found only fragmentary information on this; therefore, it may well need correction. Dr. Richard Clarke Cabot (1868-1939) was one of Whitman's correspondents, a particularly interesting one, judging from her letters to him. He is the author of several pieces listed in WorldCat, including, Foregrounds and backgrounds in work for the sick: an address delivered at the forty-third annual meeting of the New England Hospital for Women and Children (1906). It appears that Edward Twiselton Cabot (1861-1893) was Richard's older brother. A Memorial of Edward Twisleton Cabot: prepared for his brothers and intimate friends from his letters and other sources was published in 1899. And it is at least possible that their father or grandfather was the artist, Edward Clarke Cabot (1818-1901). Further information and corrections are welcome.

Mr. Parkman's grave: Francis Parkman (1823-1893), American historian. Parkman died on November 8, 1893 and is buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA. Research: Gabe Heller.

first day of St. Martin's Summer: St. Martin's Summer traditionally follows St. Martin's Day or Martinmas, which is 11 November. Wikipedia

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



William Dean Howells to SOJ


To Miss Sarah Orne Jewett
40 W. 59th St., Nov. 28, 1893.

DEAR FRIEND:

     The other night I read your Second Spring to Mrs. Howells,* and we rejoiced in it, and loved every touch and tint in it, as we always do in your work. What a divine creature you are in it, and how you do make other people's joinery seem crude and clumsy! No, you are too friendly and kind for that, but it seems so, out of a mere sense of shame and unworthiness.

     That boy, whom no successive pieces of pork would fill, where is he that I may go and sit at his feet forever?

     We read that you have been very sick and we are sorry for you with all our hearts.
 

Love to Mrs. Fields, from
Yours sincerely,
W. D. HOWELLS.

Notes

"A Second Spring" was originally published in Harper's Magazine in December 1893 and republished by Sarah Orne Jewett in The Life of Nancy in 1895.

This letter comes from Life in Letters of William Dean Howells, edited by Mildred Howells. New York: Doubleday, 1928. v. 2, pp. 15-16, 41, 146, 391-2.



SOJ to William Dean Howells

148 Charles Street.
1 December. [ 1893 ]*


Dear Mr. Howells

    How can I thank you and Mrs. Howells* for the dear and near pleasure that your letter gives me!  I find it this gray afternoon when I come up from Berwick where Thanksgiving Day as pretty gray itself yesterday, even though A. F. and Madame Blanc*  --  our charming French friend  --  were there to talk about other things and keep us from being silent at table and thinking too much of missed faces.    --  --  I do not know that I ever could have valued the kindness of your letter so much as on this very afternoon.  It was you who made me feel so long ago that it was worth while to start, and it is still you who say that it is worth while to go on which sometimes of late has seemed difficult.  I look back to certain hours in Cambridge and at Belmont* with more and more gratitude to you both as years go on.  And I thank you, dear friend and Writer, for the noble lessons you have taught your countrymen.

    I remember years ago that Miss Preston* read me something from a letter that spoke of some writers as being connected with thoughts of the sea and others as but land-locked pools and it often falls to my sad lot to remember it!  but never to my envious lot.  I am more proud every year of what you have done because I see every year more clearly how difficult it was and is.

    I am nearly well again after a wicked war of lameness and pain.  I found myself able to attend a football match  (which you would have liked to see too)  yesterday afternoon.  Theodore and his mother* and I were going anyway but we took the others along and they liked it too.  Mrs. Fields sends her love with mine to you both.  We wish so much to have Madame Blanc see you when she goes to New York by and by

                                                                                                 Your faithful friend

 


Notes

1893:  As the notes below indicate, the visit of Madame Blanc to South Berwick took place at Thanksgiving in 1893.  Also, this letter seems to follow nicely from the Howells letter above.

Mrs. Howells:  See William Dean Howells in Correspondents.

A. F. and Madame Blanc:  A. F. is Annie Adams Fields.  Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc traveled to the United States for the World Columbian Exposition in the fall of 1893.  Paula Blanchard in Sarah Orne Jewett says that Blanc and Fields made a short stay in South Berwick for Thanksgiving that year (p. 267). See Correspondents.

Belmont:  Howells at various times had homes in Belmont, MA and in Cambridge, MA.

Miss Preston:  Harriet Waters Preston. See Correspondents.

Theodore and his mother:  Theodore Jewett Eastman and Jewett's sister, Carrie Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 72, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



E

SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett and Carrie Jewett Eastman

Friday Afternoon

[ 1 December 1893 ]*

Dear Sisters

    Your sister seems to have nothing better to do than to sit down to write a letter.  The ladies are resting preparatory to going to Cambridge at four o'clock.  Luncheon was all ready when we got here a little belated, and what do you think we had?  My advice was asked so hopeful and I said  yes -- and so we eated the nice pie Mary, large helps and have got a piece saved to enjoy later unless others have by this time enjoyed it before us.  It was the Best Pie and entirely appreciated.  Madame Blanc* found the desired letter from her new daughter in law and it was begun ^Ma^ Chére Mére* and

[ Page 2 ]

was much beseemed and laughed at a little on account of their not having her address, 'which was to be found in many places in Pari' ' only they were smiled at indulgently for being on their wedding journey in Nivernais.*  Both the company had beautiful times in Berwick.*  Yesterday seems to grow pleasanter and pleasanter in their remembrance.  Thérèse has got a headache and is frightened to go to the Annex* but is going.  I guess it will be better when she comes back.  Sister knows what [ unrecognized word ] headache is!  but poor thing, she didn't get her sleep last night as we know. 

    I send you this letter from Georgie* which I shall answer as soon as I can.  You will be so pleased with

[ Page 3 ]

this dear letter from Mr. Howells.*  I dont know when any words of praise have moved me more, and his putting their names together.  I cant see anything yet of the Pilot.*  I shall get Haggerty*  to hunt me up the copy -- he probably takes it! and write to R. P. Sekenger.*  We found little Mr. Hill a-tuning the Piano* when we came in and he is still at it at nearly four.  He asked for Mrs. Eastman's health with deep interest.  He quite lighted up when I appeared along side the instrument.

    -- I have made what I could of some remembrances of the Tennyson visit* which you can slip right in

[ Page 4 ]

with yours.  It will save the trouble of your writing down just what I would have told you.  There are often things I could tell but they would take explaining.  I should like to have a little part in the paper!*  I thought you might be thinking of it Sunday.

    Love to all.  I hope you will feel to go to Portland{.}  It would be so nice to see Nelly & all.*  and pleasant to go without an occasion! as Nelly said in Exeter.  Tell Stubs I read the Herald account of the Game with great pleasure this morning -- as I came up.  There were sights-o' folks in the car.

Your Seddie --*


Notes

1 December1893:  The likelihood that this letter was composed on this Friday is high, though not absolute.  Madame Blanc was in Boston some of the time that fall, W. D. Howells wrote Jewett an especially complimentary letter dated 28 November, and there is evidence that Jewett and her nephew, Theodore, attended football games in Boston, probably at Harvard, that fall.  See notes below.

Madame Blanc
:  Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc. See Correspondents.

new daughter-in-law:  Richard Cary in "Miss Jewett and Madame Blanc" (1967, pp. 468, 480) says that Madame Blanc married the banker Édouard Alexandre Blanc (b. 1834) in 1856; their son was Édouard Blanc (1858-1923).  When she was 19, they were divorced.  Cary quotes from Grace King, Memories of a Southern Woman of Letters (1932), for a description of the younger Edouard: ". . . noted as a traveler and lecturer, and a distinguished member of the Geographical Society. He was known for his new discoveries in the country of the Pamirs. He was a tall man, a giant in frame, but not at all handsome. He talked well, with much of his mother's charm of manner. His apartment was in the story above his mother's. His large salon was. filled with bookcases. In.a particular case were books bound especially according to his own design, in white parchment, with his monogram on the back. They were all rare and on scientific subjects. He led, we were told, the life of a recluse; he seemed perfectly indifferent to every subject except literature" (139-40).
    No record of his marriage has yet been located.  Assistance is welcome.

Chére Mére:  French, Dear Mother.

Nivernais:  Nivernais is a former French province, now the Department of Nièvre.

beautiful times in Berwick:  Fields and Blanc celebrated Thanksgiving at Jewett's home in South Berwick in 1893.

the Annex:  The Harvard Annex for women's education at Harvard University, which eventually became Radcliffe College.

Georgie:  Georgina Halliburton. See Correspondents.

Mr. Howells: William Dean Howells.  See Correspondents.  Jewett thanks Howells for an especially kind letter in hers of 1 December 1893.

the Pilot... Haggerty ... R. P. SekengerThe Pilot, founded in 1829, is the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Boston. 
    Haggerty has not been identified, but appears to be someone regularly around the Fields home at this time, perhaps a Catholic employee?
    R. P. Sekenger also remains unidentified.  Assistance is welcome.

Mr. Hill a-tuning the Piano: Mr. Hill's identity remains unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

remembrances of the Tennyson visit ... a little part in the paper: Jewett reports meeting Tennyson at his home in a letter of 25 June 1882.   It appears that Mary is preparing a paper on Tennyson, who died in October 1892. for the South Berwick Woman's Club.  Further information is welcome.

Portland ... Nelly & all:  This is likely to be the family of Helen and John Gilman of Portland, ME.  See Correspondents.

Stubs ... the Herald ... the Game: Stubs is Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents. He and his aunt presumably have been reading the Boston Herald, perhaps for an account of a football game, of which Theodore was a fan.  Jewett mentions attending football matches with Theodore and Carrie in her letter to W. D. Howells of 1 December 1893.

Seddie:  One of Jewett's family nicknames. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in the Jewett Family Papers MS014.02.01.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.




Celia Laighton Thaxter to SOJ

Portsmouth 1893. [ December ]

    How good you were to copy for me, and all! All this time and I have not audibly and visibly thanked you for "Deephaven"! but really and truly in my heart I have thanked you every day for the lovely thing.* I never did see anything so enchanting, and the illustrations! every one so charming! Those Woodburys* must be wondrous clever people. Karl says: "Will you please write to Miss Jewett and tell her there never was anything quite so delightful as 'The Only Rose' story?"*

    I am waiting for the proofs of my small "garden" book,* and I am the tiredest bird that ever scratched for worms. Haven't had any "girl" since I came from the Shoals, except a little slip as goes to school, and isn't much more than a rag-baby anyway. Have written to Flower* to see if she has n't some young and needy being who wants to earn something and have a good home and be befriended. There must be plenty such, if one could find them. I don't care a bit whether she knows anything or not: I have infinite patience to teach any honest creature.

    Don't you and Mary* ever come down to Portsmouth any more? Do come!


Notes

December:  If this letter was indeed composed in 1893, it would have to have been written after the appearance of "The Only Rose" in the January 1894 Atlantic.

Deephaven:  Jewett's first novel, Deephaven, appeared in 1877.  A new illustrated edition appeared in 1893.

Woodburys:  Charles H. and Marcia Oakes Woodbury.  See Correspondents.

Karl ... "The Only Rose":  Karl Thaxter, Celia's son, was injured at birth in 1852; he limped and suffered emotional problems, requiring constant care throughout his life.  "The Only Rose" first appeared in Atlantic Monthly (73:37-46) in January 1894 and was collected in The Life of Nancy (1895).

"garden" bookAn Island Garden (1894).

Flower:  It appears that Thaxter is using a nickname for one of her common correspondents with Jewett.  This circle of friends regularly referred to each other by nicknames, but which was "Flower" does not seem commonly known.  One might guess at Rose Lamb, but assistance is necessary.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

This extract from a letter appears in Letters of Celia Thaxter Edited by her friends, A. F. [Annie Fields] and R. L. [Rose Lamb], The Riverside Press, H. O. Houghton, & Co, Cambridge, Mass. 1895.  Annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Edited by Terry Heller, Coe College.



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