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Sarah Orne Jewett Letters of 1899



SOJ to Louise Imogen Guiney

34 Beacon Street*
Thursday
[Jan. 5, 1899]*


My dear Louise

    I am late in thanking you for your dear Christmas wish and reminder, but I did not get it, nor keep my little Christmas as to presents until a few days ago when I came to town after a bad fling of illness which kept me low for a fortnight, and hindered all my proceedings. I love your word of old French and I love to have your remembrance. Mrs. Fields and I had such a happy visit to you that Sunday afternoon. I am so glad to have seen your dear mother. I felt near to her before, but all the nearer now. I wish that you would give my love to her.

    I am deeply interested in your going to the Library, and I know well how you are sure to serve your City among her books, and bring your learning where it will surely count. I suppose that you will find dull enough 'jobs' now and then that will tax your patience except that you cannot do things without a keen wish to do them well and without giving your own touch of distinction. (Forgive an old friend for speaking plain!) But I have longed to have a chance to beg you to be careful about doing other things -- while you are 'breaking in' at least. You will find your little journey tiring and you will get exercise in your walk to the station -- but don't bother with gymnasiums or that sort of thing or seeing people much. My wise father used to remind me that we have only just so much 'steam' and if you let it off in one way you didn't have it in another. I think that we have passed the moment when we believed that "exercise" gave delicate people added vigor; too often it uses up without profit what vigor they have! All this by way of saying that I love a long walk and I love a gym -- but in their proper place. I dont [sic] believe that you need the stimulant of them or the safety valve of them -- so much as you will need the time for quiet and building up -- I have had the same problems to solve with uncertain health, and Carlyle's great saying that the only happiness a man ought to ask for is happiness enough to get his work done!!*

    I am staying for a few days with an old friend and going to 148 Charles Street on Monday. I hope that we shall be seeing you some day. Mrs. Fields is better, but she is always a little delicate [word deleted] while this cold & changing weather lasts. Oh yes, we all have to "save ourselves for our work," dont we? -- but I know you will take my preaching as affectionately as I give it.

Yours always with much love

S. O. J.


Notes

34 Beacon Street:  The Boston address of Susan Burley Cabot.  See Correspondents.

Jan. 5, 1899: The date of this letter has been added by Grace Guiney, presumably from the envelope which is now lacking. The reference by Miss Jewett to Louise's work in the Boston Public Library corroborates the date; she started to work there in January, 1899.

My wise father:  Jewett often wrote of her father's wisdom, notably in the obituary she composed for him.  He was the model for the several physicians who appear in her fiction, especially A Country Doctor (1884).

Carlyle's great saying:  Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) expresses this general idea in several of his works, including 'Characteristics' (1831) and Sartor Resartus (1833). The passage to which Jewett refers is most likely Past and Present (1843), p. 110.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Dinand Library of Holy Cross College in the collection of materials of Louise Imogen Guiney.  The transcription by William L. Lucey, S. J. appeared in "'We New Englanders': Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett to Louise Imogen Guiney." Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia 70 (1959): 58-64.  In his transcription: "Words inserted above the line by Miss Jewett have been lowered and bracketed; deleted words have been bracketed and italicized or, when illegible, a deletion has been indicated."  Notes are by Lucey and supplemented by Terry Heller, Coe College.





  SOJ to Mary E. Mulholland

     148 Charles Street, Boston
     January 23, 1899

     My dear friend:

     I thank you sincerely for your most kind letter, and I wish to tell you how much pleasure it gives me to know that you like my stories, and especially that you are such a friend of Miss Betty Leicester!1 I must own that I took a great liking to her myself when I was writing her, and that she has always seemed to me to be a real person. And it is just the same way with Mrs. Todd.2
     I cannot tell you just where Dunnet Landing is except that it must be somewhere 'along shore' between the region of Tenants Harbor and Boothbay, or it might be farther to the eastward in a country that I know less well. It is not any real 'landing' or real 'harbor'3 but I am glad to think that you also know that beautiful stretch of seacoast country, and so we can feel when we think about it, as if we were neighbours. If you ever read the Atlantic Monthly magazine you will find a new chapter about Mrs. Todd and one of her friends in this new February number,4 and I hope that you will like it.
     I am sure that you must like a great many other books since you like these stories of mine. And I am so glad, because you will always have the happiness of finding friendships in books, and it grows pleasanter and pleasanter as one grows older. And then the people in books are apt to make us understand 'real' people better, and to know why they do things, and so we learn sympathy and patience and enthusiasm for those we live with, and can try to help them in what they are doing, instead of being half suspicious and finding fault. It is just the same way that a beautiful picture makes us quicker to see the same things in a landscape, to look for rich clouds and trees, and see their beauty.
     I wonder if you like Miss Thackeray's beautiful stories5 as much as I do, but I am sure you will a little later if you do not know them now.
     Good-bye, dear Mary, I send you many thanks for your letter and my kindest wishes. I hope that you will be as busy and as happy as can be and never be without plenty of friends -- in books and out of them.

     Yours affectionately,
     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

     1 Miss Mulholland was thirteen years old when she wrote to Miss Jewett about her love for Betty Leicester, A Story for Girls. She had received the book in 1890, and it had been read aloud to her until she was able to read herself.
     2 The ample landlady, artful herbalist, canny mariner, and bucolic philosopher of Dunnet Landing in The Country of the Pointed Firs.
    3 Miss Jewett always eluded precise placement of her fictional locales (see Letters 8, note 4; 30).
    4 In "The Queen's Twin," Atlantic Monthly, LXXXIII (February 1899), 235-246; collected in The Queen's Twin and Other Stories, Almiry Todd takes the narrator on a visit to Mrs. Abby Martin, who has made a fetish of her affinity with Queen Victoria.
     5 Lady Anne Isabella Thackeray Ritchie (1837-1919), eldest daughter of William Makepeace Thackeray, concentrated upon fiction for children before 1887, then gradually turned to biography and criticism. It was on her first trip to Europe (May-October 1882) that Miss Jewett met Lady Ritchie, whose art she invariably described with highest regard (see Fields, Letters, 192).

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Mellen Chamberlain

Charles Street, Boston, February 2, 1899, to Mellen Chamberlain:

            I thank you very much for your most kind remembrance and for giving me this copy of your book of essays. I will not say that it is a new book to me for I saw it very soon after it was published, but I am delighted to have such a gift from you and I shall always take it in my hands with great pleasure. I often say to myself when I think that it is a long time since I saw or heard from an old friend "Well: my stories are a sort of long letter, they tell what I have been thinking, or, if not, what I have been doing." And so it is when I have a book from a friend himself. Perhaps our books: our essays and our stories tell more than our letters could!
            I suppose it was some such feeling that came into my mind this morning when you spoke so kindly of my last sketch in the At­lantic.* You were a very kind friend many years ago when I was beginning to take my work of writing seriously and I like to re­member that kindness and interest, and to find that you still feel it in these days when so much of my work is put behind me. I wish that it had been better, but I have done the best I could, per­haps, with a kind of health that was never very certain, or very favorable to steady industry.  But my heart has always been in my stories, and I feel sometimes as if I just began to see what 1 could really do.
            I have thought many times that I should like to see you again and to talk a little about the things for which we both care. I am much pleased to know that my friend Miss [Louise Imogen] Guiney* is to have something to do with the cataloguing of your collections [of manuscripts] at the Public Library. She is one of our few really distinguished scholars among women, and a devoted student of literature. I am sure that the work will be welcome to her.
            With my best thanks for your book and your note . . .


Notes

This letter, transcribed by John Alden, originally appeared in Boston Public Library Quarterly 9 (1957): 86-96.  It is reprinted here courtesy of the Trustees of the Boston Public Library/Rare Books.
    Alden points out that Chamberlain gave Jewett a copy of his John Adams and Other Essays (1898).

Louise Imogen GuineyLouise Imogen Guiney (1861 - 1920) was an American poet, essayist and editor, born in Roxbury, Massachusetts.  See Correspondents.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Monday afternoon
[ February 27, 1899 ]

Dear Mary

            The library is so pretty -- all full of yellow light from the sunset and now I suppose it will be dark before I can get this letter done.  Sylvia Emerson* has been here for a long and dear old fashioned call.  I didn’t tell you that a day or two ago Mrs. John Forbes* heard Sylvia say I had not been well and sent me the most beautiful great box of flowers -- so many kinds!  Cherokee roses* & all sorts.  Sylvia was disposed to speak of All Tyson family.  Both Mr. Tyson and Elise’s mother were her cousins* and she is so interested always about Elise though her sister Ladd* knows her best having brought up daughter. 

Before I forget it I must tell you that A. F.* said today you must come and have a day or two when the Watsons are here Maclarens -- the seventh I think she set, so you can step from Mrs. Tyler’s* into the midst of them. . .  It seems a great while since I saw Mrs. Tyler but it was only just before I got cold again.  We have just had a telegram from Mr. Robinson who has been kept at home in New York -- so there will only be Mrs. R. & the Peirsons* (sister wants to go to the show!)*  I have got “Catherine Hunts” picky* in such a lovely old fashioned oval black & gold frame.  You shall see her in it when you come. . .  Oh laws, if I could remember to put in some clean pens I should be so gratified, but it is already duskish at this end of the room.  Good-bye with love from

Sarah

 

I have just got your beautiful letty* of Sunday.  Thank you so much.  Please send this dear letty of Nelly Prince’s right back for I want to send it up to her mother.

 


Notes

February 27, 1899:  Though tentative, this date is probably very close.  As indicated below, Annie Fields was expecting a visit from Ian Maclaren/John Watson on "the seventh."  He reports being the guest of Annie Fields in a letter of 9 March 1899 (p. 227).

Sylvia Emerson: Sylvia Hathaway Watson Emerson. See Correspondents.

Mrs. John Forbes: Sarah Hathaway (1813-1900) married John Murray Forbes (1813-1898), "an American railroad magnate, merchant, philanthropist and abolitionist ... president of both the Michigan Central railroad and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad in the 1850s."  Their sons were William Hathaway and John Malcolm.  William married Edith Emerson, daughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Cherokee roses: Wikipedia says: "Rosa laevigata, the Cherokee rose,[1] is a white, fragrant rose native to southern China and Taiwan south to Laos and Vietnam, and invasive in the United States."

Mr. Tyson and Elise’s mother were cousins: Sylvia Emerson says that George Tyson and his first wife were her cousins.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents. George Tyson's first wife was Sarah Anthony (1842-1873) of New Bedford, MA.

her sister Ladd:  According to A Sedgwick Genealogy, Sylvia Emerson's younger sister, Anna Russell Watson (1843-1909) married William Jones Ladd (1844-1923).  See also The Ladd Family, pp. 240-1.

A. F: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents

Watsons ...  Maclarens ... Mrs. Tyler’s:  Dr. John Watson (Ian Maclaren):  Wikipedia says:  "Rev. John Watson (3 November 1850 - 6 May 1907), known by his pen name Ian Maclaren, was a Scottish author and theologian.... Maclaren's first stories of rural Scottish life, Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush (1894), achieved extraordinary popularity, selling more than 700 thousand copies, and were succeeded by other successful books, The Days of Auld Lang Syne (1895), Kate Carnegie and those Ministers (1896), and Afterwards and other Stories (1898)."  Annie Fields records a dinner at her home that included John Watson on the evening of Monday, 11 March 1907.
    The identity of Mrs. Tyler is unknown, though it is clear from other letters that Mary Rice Jewett often visited her when staying in Boston.  In a letter of 8 September 1895, Jewett mentions a visit to South Berwick by her and Hattie.  There are letters in the Houghton Library between A. M. Tyler and T. E. Tyler and members of the Jewett family.  Further information is welcome.

Mr. Robinson ... Mrs. R. & the Peirsons:  These persons have not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

the show:  It is possible that this is a presentation by Maclaren/Watson.  He reports in his letter of 9 March 1899 that while in Boston, "I had the pleasure of showing the 'Face of the Master," which is Sefton Park work, since it is the joint production of the minster and the clerk of the deacons' court.  There was a large audience, and the slides were much admired."  Watson was minster of Sefton Park Presbyterian Church, Liverpool, 1880-1905.  His book, The Life of the Master, a biography of Jesus, appeared serially in McClure's Magazine in 1900.  According to an interview article in the Chicago Tribune (24 March 1899), "The Face of the Master," was a presentation of material that would become part of Watson's life of Jesus.

“Catherine Hunts" picky:  It seems probable that Jewett refers to a portrait of Catherine Clinton Howland (1841-1909), wife of  the prominent American architect, Richard Morris Hunt (1827-1895). The photograph of Mrs. Hunt with her son, Livingston, at her Find-a-Grave page could be a copy of the one to which Jewett refers.

Hunt


letty
:  Jewett's word for "letter."

Nelly Prince's: Richard Cary identifies Helen Choate Prince, (1857-1943), granddaughter of Rufus Choate, and wife of Charles Albert Prince the Boston lawyer.  She was the author of The Story of Christine Rochefort (1895) and three other novels.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



 SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

[Sunday morning, February 1899]

I  was pretty late to luncheon in consequence and people began to come before I got dressed and came steadily all the whole afternoon.  It was one of those times but who should appear but dear Mrs. Agassiz* who had come all the way in a-purpose to talk about the Queen’s Twin,* and we had to leave everything and sit together and hold hands, and she said she had smiled and laughed, and then she had to cry.  I cant tell you all she said -- but it was such a pleasure to give her any pleasure -- as you know.  Alice Longfellow* was here and I promised to go to lunch with her Tuesday.  She is going abroad with the Danas* right away.  She wishes there were some body to take her house & go right on with it for the Spring.  Good bye now with much love from Sarah


Notes

Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Sunday Morning].

Mrs. Agassiz: Elizabeth Cabot (Cary) Agassiz (1822 -1907) "was an American educator, and the co-founder and first president of Radcliffe College. A researcher of natural history, she was a contributing author to many scientific published works with her husband, [Harvard University professor] Louis Agassiz [1807-1873]."

the Queen's Twin:  Jewett's story, "The Queen's Twin," appeared in Atlantic Monthly (83:235-246) in February 1899 and simultaneously in Cornhill Magazine (London, n.s. 6:145-161).

Alice Longfellow: See Correspondents.

the Danas:  See Richard Henry Dana III in Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


 SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[Wed night, March 1899]

It is really beautiful, as you said, to find that my little lamp isn’t going out, but it makes more and more hard thinking and care to keep it going.  Though one has a kind of capital in all the work she has done. --- There are those who are so funny just now, Louisa* having sent round to be signed a petition to the Mayor of Boston, against the imported Finch or English sparrow* whose presence is no longer deemed expedient.  It was signed by the Bishop & other clergy -- by capitalists and society leaders of highest degrees[,] Mrs. Gardner and the Ames’* and college professors[,] without regard to other opinions and it did seem like such engineering against one little fluffy one, but you had to remember their numbers and how they troubled the other birds to whom New England belongs.  You might be keeping snow birds Mary, and have some of Aunt Anne’s little chippys with the stripes on their heads for summer* -- dear little things.  I am hoping that you will be coming along in a day or two.  I am sure you dont need to be reminded that we shall be just in time after the Watsons* visit to go down to little Aunt’s birthday -- and so home.  I wonder if we shall get to “Maria’s”* -- perhaps when I am coming back.  Good night with much love.  Miss Jane Addams & Mr. Woods are coming to dinner tomorrow night, & Mrs. Wolcott & Miss Annette Rogers (both Overseers of the Poor for the City of Boston.)  It may sound sober but I know them all to the contrary, though I dont doubt there will be good things to hear.  Respects to the Treasurer*

                                                                                                S. O. J.

 
Notes

March 1899: Dating this letter is somewhat problematic, though there is a good deal of precise information available.  It seems fairly clear that when Jewett refers to the Watsons, she means John Watson/Ian Maclaren, the Scots author, who visited Annie Fields in March of 1899.  Several other seeming correspondences, such as Aunt Mary Long's birthday, point toward this date for the letter.  Yet the petition regarding English Sparrows to which Jewett refers was presented to the Mayor of Boston in March of 1898.  It seems odd that Jewett would refer to it a full year after it appeared, though the controversy over reducing the sparrow population continued into 1899, and Jewett may be responding to municipal attempts to eliminate the birds from public parks and cemeteries.  This seeming delay may be accounted for by noting that in March of 1898, Jewett and Fields were preparing for their long trip to Europe that began in late March or early April.
    Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Wed. night].

Louisa:  Almost certainly Louisa Dresel.  See Correspondents.

Mayor of Boston ... finch or English sparrow: The Audubon Society's Bird-Lore magazine (1899) offers a brief account of "The So-called Sparrow War in Boston," 1898-1899 (pp. 137-8).  According to this account, in March 1898 a petition was presented to Josiah Quincy, Mayor of Boston, signed by "a host of representative Bostonians."  The petition asserted that "the noxious imported Finch, known as the English Sparrow, has come to be a public nuisance."  It asked that their numbers be reduced, particularly in public places, such as the Boston Common and in cemeteries.  See also Kim Todd's "The Sparrow War," Chapter 4 of Sparrow (2013).

the Bishop ... Mrs. Gardner and the Ames’:  Jewett is likely referring to the Episcopal Bishop of the Archdiocese of Massachusetts, William Lawrence.  But she may mean the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston at the time, John Joseph Williams.
    Mrs. Gardner is Isabella Stewart Gardner.  See Correspondents.
    While this is not certain, it seems likely that Jewett refers to the Ames family, relatives of Frederick Lothrop Ames (1835-1893), who built the Ames Building as "corporate headquarters for the families' agricultural tool company."  This was Boston's first skyscraper and from 1893 to 1915, it was the tallest secular building in Boston.

snow birds ... Aunt Anne’s little chippys with the stripes on their heads for summer:  Jewett's description suggests that she believes that English Sparrow refugees from Boston may seek shelter in South Berwick, where Mary will feed them along with local birds.

Watson's: Though Jewett may refer to Dr. John Watson (Ian Maclaren), the Scottish author and theologian, it seems rather certain that this letter was composed in March of 1898, while Watson/Maclaren's stay with Annie Fields was in March 1899.  It seems more likely that she refers to other Watson acquaintances, perhaps relatives of Sylvia Hathaway Watson Emerson.  See Correspondents.

little Aunt's ... "Maria's":  While it is difficult to be certain which of Jewett's aunts is "little Aunt," her favorite Aunt Mary Long's birthday was March 9.
    The identity of "Maria" is uncertain, especially as it is in quotation marks.  Ella Walworth's middle name was Maria.   In Sarah Orne Jewett, Blanchard mentions a Cousin Maria (p. 36) as residing in Portsmouth, NH.  Further information is welcome.

Miss Jane Addams & Mr. Woods: Jane Addams (1860 - 1935), "was a pioneer American settlement activist/reformer, social worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in women's suffrage and world peace. She co-founded, with Ellen Gates Starr, the first settlement house in the United States, Chicago's Hull House that would later become known as one of the most famous settlement houses in America." Wikipedia
    Robert Archey Woods (1865 - 1925) was a settlement house pioneer, founder of South End House, the first settlement in Boston.  He was a social reformer, author, and educator.

Mrs. Wolcott & Miss Annette Rogers (both Overseers of the Poor for the City of Boston.):  Jewett was acquainted with Mrs. Edith Wolcott, wife of Massachusetts governor (1896-1898) Roger Wolcott (1847-1900).  Edith (1853-1934) was the daughter of American historian William Hicking Prescott. See "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters" in Colby Library Quarterly 7 (March 1975): 45. 
    Little has been learned about Annette Rogers.  Her name is listed with contributors to and officers for the Overseers of the Poor for the City of Boston, where Annie Fields also was active.  She helped to organize the Howard Industrial School for "colored" refugees from the Civil War in Cambridge, MA.  See Lydia H. Farmer, What America Owes to Women (1893, p. 365).

Treasurer:  While this allusion seems obscure, it is likely Jewett refers to Rebecca Young, who was Treasurer of the South Berwick Savings Bank.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[Wed. evening, March 1899]*

 

Sally* only got home last night and says that poor Mr. Kipling* is still very feeble and far from getting up.  She saw him several times but he only sees one person a day yet -- and I think gets out of his head easily from weakness and thinks all the children are gone etc.  I suppose he misses them about.  He sent his love to me she said.  They mean to go back to England just as soon as he is able, but I believe there is no thought of it before the last of May.  Lily Norton* is thinking of going to Quebec this summer and staying with Sister St. Andre as Therese did.*  You know she has hay fever so, poor child, that she is driven about from pillar to post.  Sister St. A. wrote a most lovely letty, and also one to me, which you shall have but I lent it to Lily today.  Give much love to Liddy.*

Yours affectionately 

 Sarah

Tighe & Burke* said that the gloves were sent a week ago (to Berwick)


Notes

March 1899:  This date is based upon the report of Kipling visiting in New England and being seriously ill, events of 1899.  See notes below.  Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Wed. evening].

Sally:  Sara Norton.  See Correspondents.

Mr. Kipling:  Rudyard Kipling.  See Correspondents.  According to "A Kipling Chronology," the Kipling family, who had resided in New England (1892-1896) at the beginning of their marriage, returned to visit in 1899, where they all became seriously ill.  Kipling nearly died. His 6-year-old daughter, Josephine, died in early March.

Lily Norton: Elizabeth Gaskell Norton.  See Correspondents.

Sister St. Andre .. Therese:  According to Sadliers' Catholic Directory, Almanac and Ordo (1883), in the Archdiocese of Quebec, Sister St. Andre was superior at the Sisters of the Good Shepherd Convent of  St. Laurent .  She led four sisters, and they taught 85 pupils in their school (p. 10). 
    For Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc, see Correspondents.

Liddy: Richard Cary identifies Liddy as Elizabeth Jervis Gilman.  See Correspondents.

Tighe & Burke:  Tighe & Burke are listed as grocers in the 1899 Long Distance Phone Directory for Boston. In The Boston Directory (1879), the proprietor's names are John Tighe and William Burke, with an address on Charles St., Boston.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Ida M. Tarbell

March 29th [1899]*
Boston

Dear Miss Tarbell

        I am glad to send you a message by our friend Mr. Morton who will carry you Mrs. Fields's and my own affectionate messages of remembrance.  I shall not be surprised to find that this note begins a friendship.  You have have many interests in

[ Page 2 ]

common.  ( I now  speak humbly as a former contributor!) and I think that you will be interested in Mr. Morton's stories of which I hope he will speak to you. .  I wish that I could see you again.

Yours affectionately
Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

1899:  It seems very likely that Jewett (along with Annie Fields) here provides a letter of introduction for Johnson Morton (1865-1922).  According to Wikipedia, Morton (Harvard 1886) was editor at the The Youth's Companion (1893-1907).  Jewett probably became acquainted with him around May 1899, when she resumed publishing in The Youth's Companion, after a 7-year hiatus.  From 1899, when she published two pieces there, she published one each year through 1903.
    It is not yet known when Jewett first met Tarbell.  Tarbell joined McClure's in 1894, a year after Jewett's first publication in the magazine.  Jewett did not appear again in McClure's until April 1899.  She then published several stories in McClure's through 1904.
    In SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett [September 9, 1900], Jewett speaks of Morton and of Tarbell as people she knows and indicates that they are likely to meet soon at Annie Fields's Manchester home, suggesting that all of them are by this time acquainted with each other.
    While it seems likely that this letter was written after May 1899 and before September 1900, in March 1900, Jewett and Fields were traveling in Europe.  Therefore, it seems more likely that the letter was composed in 1899.
    That Jewett speaks of herself as a "former contributor" may indicate her desire to contribute again in the future; however, it is possible that she writes after her 1902 carriage accident, when her fiction-writing career ended.  It is possible that this letter should be dated after 1902 and closer to 1907, when Morton resigned from The Youth's Companion to focus on publishing his fiction.

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Allegheny College Library, Special Collections: Letter: Sarah O. Jewett to Ida M. Tarbell, March 29  Allegheny College DSpace Repository.  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


Excuse an [ectographic ?] pen!!*

   Wednesday Morning  [April 1899]*

Dearest Annie 

  I am all in my morning bed with a nice bright fire & feeling much better pains & all! --  The cool weather seems to work well -- at any rate. I have lost a good deal of an exhausted [a dot appears here, like a period] mouse under an air receiver feeling that appertained to [those changed from the] hot days.  But after a most beautiful & I may say royal dream of you and me and Queen Victoria* who sat and talked to you a long time as if she had never been blessed with

[Page 2]

a real friend before and was a most dear little leisurely old lady to whom I shall [hereafter corrected] feel a personal attachment; -- [After corrected] this I waked to a great worry about you on your hill* in this gray, windy morning and felt as if I could n't have you there another minute.  Oh do come away if it is so cold and windy darling Fuff* --  I do hope you wont get cold or tired or hungry!

[Page 3]

without your Pinny* to make a fuss! After you went away dear S. W.* came and I went down to the reception room and she stayed some time so dear, and as leisurely as the Queen! though I suppose she had everything to do.  I had a lovely time with her and I was lying on the blue couch while she sat along side.  Then I had a nice luncheon with more of the clam

[Page 4]

soup.  (I wish you had a hot cupful now!) and then I got off very well but feeling pretty invalidish, and "so home["] as Mr. Pepys* would say.  Katy* is doing so nicely -- I like her cooking very much.  [We corrected] have had muffins of the best and a quite perfect mince for breakfast.  John* is in great feather.  Mary* looks rather sulky to me poor child we shall see: Katy is the main thing & seems contented so far.

    With dearest love fondly from P.L.


Notes

ectographic pen:  It seems likely Jewett refers to a hectographic/ectographic pencil, normally used in forms of transfer art, such as tattoos.  For a letter this could present difficulties because the soft, colored "lead" might easily smear.  However, there is little smearing on the manuscript.

April 1899:  The main reason for this date is that Katy Galvin is reported as still settling in.  See Correspondents.

Queen Victoria:  "Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death."  Jewett's story, "The Queen's Twin," which may be seen as including dreams of Queen Victoria, appeared in Atlantic Monthly (83:235-246) in February 1899.

your hill ... Fuff:  Fuff is one of Annie Fields' nicknames.  Her summer home in Manchester, MA, stands on Thunderbolt Hill.

PinnyP.L. or  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

S. W.:  Sarah Wyman Whitman.  See Correspondents.

Mr. PepysSamuel Pepys (1633 - 1703) "was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament who is most famous for the diary that he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man."  The phrase "and so home" occurs with some frequency in his Diary of Samuel Pepys (1660-1669)

Katy ... John:  Katy Galvin and John Tucker were Jewett family employees.  See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

    Friday morning [April 1899]*

Dearest Annie

    How fast the week is going!  You will be flitting back to town before we know it, but oh what lovely weather one sees these bright mornings that come shining into my room.  I went out, too, yesterday to look about the garden, but I dont feel like doing much yet, very slow and of quite an inferior quality!  I read Mon Frere Yves* again yesterday and our fortnight in Brittany has made it a new book and far

[ Page 2 ]

more beautiful.  Mary* was full of affairs.  She had Mary Boyd* back for a day to sweep & dust the other house and put the rugs and blankets out &c -- Katy* goes on delightfully well.  I think you will like her results (of cooking!) very much. -- all kinds of nice bread and remarkable coffee, and as a whole most satisfactory to both of us.  I forgot the blue waterproof at first but I sent it yesterday dear

[ Page 3 ]

with some white poppy seeds inside, we might give Alice Howe* a few if she happens along.  She too has much luck with poppies.  How Sandpiper* would have grown them -- bigger than any of us!  I think of you very often dear, and how busy you must be by day.  This sun will shine bright into your room.  Do you sit there in the evening or does the furnace make it nice & warm in the little study?  Stubby has reported

[ Page 4 ]

the sophomore dinner at the Vendome* as a great occasion. (on Tuesday evening last.).  Mary sends love.*  Yours always most lovingly.

        Pinny.*


Katy befriends both Bobby & Timmy* & the cats from the stable!  &  becomes at once a General Favorite !!


Notes

April1899:  As the notes below indicate, Jewett writes on a Friday after the 1899 Harvard Sophomore Dinner, which traditionally took place at roughly mid-semester, e.g. April 5, 1898.  If it took place the first Tuesday in April in 1899, that would have been April 4.

Mon Frere YvesMy Brother Yves (1883) "is a semi-autobiographical novel by French author Pierre Loti [1850-1923]. It describes the friendship between French naval officer Pierre Loti and a hard drinking Breton sailor Yves Kermadec during the 1870s and 80s. It was probably Loti's best-known book,[1] and its descriptions of Breton seafaring life, on board ship and on shore, set the tone for his later acclaimed work An Iceland Fisherman (1886)."
    Jewett and Fields most recent trip to Europe was in the spring - autumn of 1898.

Mary ... full of affairs:  Jewett's sister, Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mary Boyd:  Mary Ann Boyd is mentioned in other letters as early as 1897; this letter makes clear that she did housekeeping work for the Jewetts.  Except for the fact that there were Boyds living in South Berwick at this time, no details about this Mary Boyd have been located.  Assistance is welcome.

Katy:  Katy Galvin, a newly arrived Jewett family employee.  See Correspondents.

Alice Howe:  Alice Greenwood (Mrs. George Dudley) Howe.  See Correspondents.

Sandpiper:  A nickname for Celia Thaxter, who died in 1894.  See Correspondents.

Stubby ... Sophomore dinner .. Vendome:  Stubby is the Jewett sisters' nephew, Theodore.  His sophomore year at Harvard was 1898-9.  See Correspondents.
    The Hotel Vendome (1871) was a luxury hotel on Commonwealth St. in Boston.
    The 1898 Harvard Sophomore Dinner was held on Tuesday April 5, at 7 p. m: "Tickets will be $2.00 and no dress suits will be worn."  No information has been located about the 1899 dinner.  Assistance is welcome.

Mary:  This Mary is Mary Rice Jewett.

Pinny:  One of the nicknames Annie and Sarah use for Sarah.

Bobby & Timmy: Timmy is a Jewett family dog.  In SOJ to Annie Adams Fields Monday morning. [Before September 1902], Jewett reports the death of Bobby, a pet bird.

The manuscript of this letter is held in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to
Elizabeth Jervis Gilman

     South Berwick, Maine
     Saturday
     [April 22, 1899]

     Dear Lizzie:

     You can't think how I am enjoying the butternuts! I have had a great feast, especially the day after they came -- Wednesday morning -- when I was busy in the garden and kept a deposit with a useful hammer on the stone carriage-block where I returned every little while to crack a few and enjoy a season of rest!! Gardening takes hold of a person in the early days of the season, and I wish that I could always have butternuts to see me through! You were so kind to remember my love for them, and I thank you very much.
     I have meant to write each day but I have been out of doors more than usual and Theodore is at home this week for his vacation, and has his friend Russell Greeley with him.1 They go back tomorrow and are enjoying every minute, it seems to me. Everybody belonging to this family looks a little sunburnt.
     We are so glad to have a card from dear Cousin Alice now and then; the water2 is a blessing at any rate, but I bless it beside for bringing us a word from her. It makes me so happy to think that she feels a little stronger this spring, but don't let her do too much in the garden (unless you have saved out a few butternuts to stay her; I do find them so efficacious!). We are not doing anything very new this year but you know, Cousin Alice knows, that there are always gaps to fill, and transplantings to do after the long winter. Mary is very well and busy. We mean to spend a few days in Boston next week.
     With my thanks again, dear Liddy, and love to you and all the family, especially your mother, I am

     Your very affectionate cousin,
     Sarah


Notes

     1 Russell Hubbard Greeley (1878-1956), a classmate of Theodore Eastman at Harvard College. Eastman is Jewett's nephew. See Correspondents.  The Third Catalog of the Signet (1903) shows that Greeley was living in Boston soon after his 1901 graduation, where he was studying painting, and notes that while at Harvard, he was editor of the Lampoon (p. 79). He studied at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston School, where he won two student prizes in 1905.  He is listed among the members of the Tavern Club of Boston in 1904.

     2 Paradise Spring Water. The Paradise Spring bottling company was one of the schemes of Charles Jervis Gilman to restore his fortune. The spring ran through a tract originally granted to the Dunlap family, on the road to Bath about a mile from Brunswick. The naturally filtered water, although excellent, never managed to replace the Poland Spring brand in popular favor. Miss Jewett was an habitual user of curative waters.
     For fuller information about the members of the Gilman family mentioned in this letter, and about Jewett's sister, Mary, see Correspondents. 

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by the Sarah Orne Jewett Papers, George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections and Archives, Bowdoin College Library.  Notes supplemented by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Russell Marble


South Berwick Maine
24 April 1899

My dear Mrs Marble

    As far as I have any right in the volumes of Mrs Thaxters poems which I edited,* I am only too glad to have you reprint anything that you choose.  I am sure that the publishers will make no objections, especially for such a delightful collection*

[ Page 2 ]

as you seem to have in mind.

    I send you my best wishes for its success; I should have answered your note sooner but I have been ill.

Yours most sincerely

S. O. Jewett

Notes

Thaxters poems:  After the death of her close friend, Jewett participated in bringing out two collections of Celia Thaxter's poems, writing introductions for Stories and Poems for Children (1895) and The Poems of Celia Thaxter (1896). See Celia Thaxter in Correspondents.

delightful collection:  Almost certainly, Jewett refers to Nature Pictures by American Poets (1899), edited by Annie Russell Marble. Marble included in this collection Thaxter's "The Song-Sparrow" (pp. 77-8).  This poem had appeared in The Poems of Celia Thaxter (pp. 57-9).

The manuscript of this letter is held by the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA in Marble, Annie Russell, Correspondence, 1888 - 1929 Location: Misc. Mss, Boxes ‘EM.”  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller. Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


        Saturday morning  [May 1899]

Dearest Annie

                I hope that you had a good day in town, and oh how I wish that I were bustling away among the things that ought to be done in Manchester!  I wonder if I could send you any pieces for covers or help you in any way?  Mary* sent little supplies for the garden yesterday fearing that the mint on the cistern top might all have been run off into the grass.  She thought you would like the forgetmenots too.  They will do just as well

[ Page 2]

where it is a little shady.  I felt better last night and waked up feeling more alive and in much less pain "through me" --  Yesterday I felt pretty poor all day long and so tired if I heard any body talking and all that -- but I think it must have been the last day of that kind for this morning seems quite different.  I have been very careful just as I promised, and I haven't seen or spoken to any body outside the household since


[ Page 3]

I came back, and have kept warm and, in short, minded all my promises! -- Becca* was pleased with your message and we take great interest in all the Manchester affairs --  Yesterday I read The Pearl of Orr's Island* or rather finished it as I had begun it when I was last at home.  I take back all my childish belief that the last half of the book was not so good.  The Spanish Episode* is is of thinner texture, but all the rest full of marvelous truth & beauty.  I love to find just the same delicious

[ Page 4]

pleasure in certain places that I found at ten!  I still think that she wrote it, [most corrected] of it at her very best height.  I [wish corrected] as I have long wished, to go to Orr's Island again. [It corrected] is a lovely corner of the earth -- [line under the dash] Somewhere[.]  Speaking of a change of religion from Catholic to Protestant, she says that [when written over a letter] [one corrected] breaks the cup one is is apt to spill the sacred wine -- it all touches of human nature and of the outer earth are of her best in the book.  The two heroines most lovely especially "Sally

[14 circled in lower left corner of page 4]

[ Page 5]

Kittredge'* -- You see I cannot help talking about the story still! 

    I hope you will have a good day tomorrow, perhaps a walk, and to think of Pinny* if you please.  I am so glad you like the Browning letters.*  I am more in an Orr's Island mood, as you see, and perhaps you would [add ?] that such is generally the case with Miss P. L.

    News came yesterday that Susy Woodbury's sister* had [died corrected] --  younger than she and leaving little twin girls

[ Page 6]

a year or two old.  She had married a young doctor & lived in [Wollaston corrected].  Susy was here & Mary went to see her.  The old father is much broken, and I am afraid this will bring an untimely burden upon Mrs. Oakes. -- Remember me to Maggie & Cassie* and now I shall leave the other page because it may be useful!

    With dearest love
                    Pin


Notes

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Becca:  Becca very likely is Rebecca Young (1847-1927).  In Sarah Orne Jewett: her World and her Work (2002), Paula Blanchard says: "Rebecca Young, who lived a few doors from the Jewetts, was an old classmate of the [Jewett] sisters from the days of Miss Raynes's school and Berwick Academy and an intimate friend of both Mary and Carrie.  She was for many years treasurer of the South Berwick Savings Bank" (p. 203).  She was riding with Sarah Orne Jewett on 3 September 1902, when a stumbling horse threw both of them from the carriage.

The Pearl of Orr's Island ... The Spanish Episode ... Sally Kittredge:  Sally Kittredge and Mara Lincoln are the protagonists of Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, The Pearl of Orr's Island (1866).  Presumably, the Spanish episode refers to Chapter 9 of the novel, which consists mainly of a letter that tells the story of Dolores, daughter of Don Jose Mendoza, a Spanish gentleman who becomes a slave-owning planter in Florida.

Pinny: one of Jewett's nicknames.

Browning letters:  Two main volumes of "Browning" letters were available to Jewett and Fields, The letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett, 1845-1846 (1889) and Life and letters of Robert Browning (1891) by Sutherland Orr.

Susy Woodbury's sisterKatrina M. "Kathrine" Oakes Adams (1867 - 4 May 1899) was the younger sister of Susan Marcia Oakes Woodbury.  See Correspondents.   Katrina married Dr. Charles Sumner Adams on October 18, 1894 in South Berwick, ME.  Their twin daughters, Catherine and Marcia, were born April 8, 1896.  Katrina died in South Berwick, and is buried in the Portland Street Cemetery.  Katrina and Susy's father was Abner Oakes (1820 - 2 September 1899), a well-known local judge. 
    That Jewett says Katrina and her family lived at Wollaston, MA is somewhat mysterious, as they seemed to be living in South Berwick at the time of her death.  Further information is welcome.

Maggie & Cassie:  Believed to be employees of Annie Fields.  More information is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


            Saturday morning  [27 May 1899]

        Your paper about Glass Decoration* is beautiful dear! beautifully thought and delightfully well done.  I got it just too late to read it, and say so in this morning's letter.  I am sure that dear S. W.* will like it, and that so many will agree in what a Partial Pinny* now says.

    -- It seems like a Midsummer day and the house is pleasanter for the first time this year with the blinds shut.  I suppose that this good breeze comes off the water at Manchester, but it is [is repeated] both 

[ Page 2]

hot and bright -- I am not going out until later in the afternoon.

     -- Do you remember remember that Tuesday is Decoration Day?*  I was afraid that you might be counting on doing things in town that you cant do.  Somehow the day seems more serious [than corrected] ever, and more and more it comes to be like All Saints Day abroad, a day of remembering those who are gone.

    -- I had the most friendly letter this morning from Mrs. Crafts asking me to come to Ridgefield* to make

[ Page 3]

a visit long of S. W.* on the 13th of June & said she was going to ask Mrs. Wister.*  How I should fly! ---- but as I read the [letter corrected] it seemed quite impossible.  Still it is more than a fortnight and I can't stay always in this incompetent state.  I shall think tomorrow and write at night or Monday.  Perhaps by that time & after I have had a week at Manchester or some days, it would be a good thing -- I could go from there & come back which would make it easier.
    But how Kind of her!
    And oh, your letter was so dear

[ Page 4]

and I felt quite set up by it -- hearing about every thing & almost feeling as if I were there.  I send back old Margarets letter* -- how good to know that she is with her own people.  And the quotation was so nice -- such a pretty remembrance!  by which I mean more than the words seem to say.

    This is only a word between times but I send you much love dear --

            S. O. J.

I am afraid that these lilacs will all be gone by the time you come -- They are in full bloom today to the least tips of the plumes --

[ M circled in another hand, bottom left of page 4]

Notes

paper about Glass Decoration:  Annie Fields's "Notes on Glass Decoration" appeared in The Atlantic Monthly 83, Issue: 500, June 1899, pp. 807-812.  The article included discussion of the work of Sarah Wyman Whitman.  See Correspondents.

S. W.:  Sarah Wyman Whitman.  See Correspondents.

Tuesday is Decoration Day:  Now called Memorial Day in the United States, Decoration Day fell on May 30, a Tuesday in 1899.  Decoration Day was a day of remembrance for American war dead, and in 1899, attention tended still to focus on the Civil War dead, though the Spanish-American War also was on Americans' minds.

All Saints Day: The Roman Catholic Feast of all Saints falls on 1 November.

Mrs. Crafts ... Ridgefield:  James Mason Crafts (1839 - 1917), an American chemist, taught and worked at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. and in 1899 was serving as president of MIT.  In 1868, he married Clemence Haggerty (1841 - 1912), who is very likely the Mrs. Crafts Jewett refers to.  The Crafts had a summer home in Ridgefield, CT. 

Mrs. Wister:  Mary Channing (Mrs. Owen) Wister.  See Correspondents.

old Margarets letter:  Jewett and Fields knew several women named Margaret.  Which may be referred to here is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

            Monday Morning
                [29th corrected] May [1899]

Dearest Annie

                Oh how good it was to hear the soft rain coming down on the thin leaves and dry grass last Saturday night! -- we were very thirsty in this piece of country -- but I am afraid that you & Sister Sarah* had to be housed more than you liked.  However, you & she had a good taste of salt air and that is a first rate tonic.  I have not written to Mrs. Crafts* yet, as waiting until today would only make my letter

[ Page 2]

one day later -- not two: and the more I think it it, the more I [see corrected] that it would be almost too much to do.  If it were hot weather which is likely, I should be ^too^ much tired when I got there -- And I feel as if it were [very corrected] uncertain that dear S.W.* could go -- in a week so close both to moving to the Shore and to the Radcliffe Commencement* -- If only you were here to con advise with P.L.* she would find it a great consolation in [this corrected] anxious moment -- but 'she' has got along so slowly that it does not seem safe to count on being very well

[ Page 3]

indeed within two weeks.  Perhaps I shall hear from S.W. this morning.

=  No.  No letters except odds & ends, and one from Therese* which I shall send in my next letter.  Mary* would like to read it.  No: you shall have it & send it back to me for her.  It has a very dear tone.  I feel as if I had been with dear Thérèse at her quietest and sweetest minute -- Here is Mrs. Craft's letter too which I know you will like.  Goodbye

[ Page 3]

darling Fuff,* and dont get cold now that it is cool weather.

says your most loving

                    Pinny

[13 circled at bottom left corner of page 3]

 
Notes

Sister Sarah:  Presumably this is Annie Fields's sister, Sarah Holland Adams (1823-1916).

Mrs. Crafts:  James Mason Crafts (1839 - 1917), an American chemist, taught and worked at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. and in 1899 was serving as president of MIT.  In 1868, he married Clemence Haggerty (1841 - 1912), who is very likely the Mrs. Crafts Jewett refers to.  The Crafts had a summer home in Ridgefield, CT.

Radcliffe Commencement:  Radcliffe College's Class Day was 21 June 1899, followed by commencement on 27 June.  Elizabeth Cary Agassiz (1822-1907) gave the address, which is included in the report in the Harvard Graduates’ Magazine 8, no. 29 (Sept. 1899): 65-70.  This report indicates that S. W., Sarah Wyman Whitman (see Correspondents), was present for Class Day. Whitman and her husband, Henry, both were guests at the 27 June commencement dinner, where Henry gave a presentation, "Style in Art" (p. 73).

P.L.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

Therese:  Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc.  See Correspondents.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Fuff:  One of Annie Fields' nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     South Berwick, Maine
     June 5, 1899

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     I shall take great pleasure in reading your story and in helping you in any way that I can about it. I don't hesitate to say, however, that from long experience I have only got a more complete assurance that 'pulls' do not count: a good story is its own best pull!
     Please let me have the manuscript as soon as you can. It will come in just the right time for I am in the last week or two of idleness after a long illness, and presently I must turn to my own writing again.
     With kindest remembrance to you and your wife,1 believe me ever

     Yours sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

See Richard Cary. "Jewett on Writing Short Stories." Colby Library Quarterly 10 (June 1964): 425-440.

     1 In 1887 Thaxter married Mary Gertrude Stoddard (1858-1951) of Worcester, Massachusetts, mistress of the house at the time of this letter.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     Manchester, Massachusetts
     June 11, [1899]

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     Your note and the story reached me here, and I have been eager to write you sooner but I was prevented yesterday. I wish that we could have a long talk for there are many things that I should find it much easier to say than to write. I think that the story has many fine qualities but it seems to me to fail in construction. You introduce your characters in an interesting way always, but there are too many of them for the length of the story and, if I may speak plainly, too many starts which do not come to sufficient importance. There is the really delightful, spirited beginning in which you make one deeply interested in the old house, the Doctor and his family, and the Scotch dependents, (your landscape and especially your descriptions are beautifully done) but afterward you keep making new claims upon the reader's attention and interest: there is the castaway and his mysterious history, then his relation to the little girl; then one must follow her career; then his as an inventor; then there are divergences into his past history etc., from all of which one expects more satisfaction, or some final results, and at the last you do not completely relate his shadowed fame, and his record as Deserter, to the story, that is, you bring it in too lightly and casually -- I do not like the letter being lost!! And the whole sketch is confused and bewildering and even improbable, as if one saw a beautiful, quiet piece of landscape painting with its figures hastily done, and crowded and even puzzling to the eye. I cannot praise enough the pictures of nature, the keen observation of sea and shore. I think that you have tried to do a very difficult thing in your plot, and that it would be a great wonder if you had quite succeeded.
     I wish that you would try something that does not aim so much at incidents. Take a simpler history of life: that very doctor who goes to help some lonely neighbour, and finds himself close to one of the tragedies or comedies of rustic life. Try to give his own life with its disappointments, his growth of sympathy etc in that lonely place. You could make a series of short sketches of him and his casual patients, his walks or rides to the lonely farms and homes along shore in winter nights and summer dawns, and find yourself following out his character in interesting ways. Just write things that you know and have done.
     This piece of work interests me a good deal. I find such an interesting inheritance in it here and there of some of your mother's gifts of saying things, and I also find things that are wholly your own and which make me urge you to go on.
     I think that you could easily get this story printed, but not in just the places where I should like to have you start, and besides there is too much really good material to make light of. I somehow wish to simplify it, to have you think about it again and see if you agree with what I have said. And don't go to work at it for some time, but try what you can do with the doctor -- defeated, invalided, isolated in the strange old house. Write some real thing about his being knocked for some summer night and going to see a patient, and coming home again. Don't write a 'story' but just tell the thing! I am afraid that I am disappointing you, but I know you will like it best if I write frankly.1
     Mrs. Fields is not here just now, but I know she would wish to have me send a very kind message to you. We were both much pained to hear of your uncle Cedric's death. I think of your uncle Oscar a great deal.2
 
     Believe me ever
     Yours most sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

     1 No copy of this story survived among his manuscripts. It is noteworthy that Miss Jewett's remarks in these letters to Thaxter add up to a declaration of her own principles of composition for the short story and a remarkably close reflection of her own practices.
     2 Mrs. Fields is Annie Adams Fields.  Cedric Laighton (1840-1899) and Oscar Laighton (1839-1939) were brothers of Celia Thaxter (see Correspondents). They managed the Appledore House, a resort hotel on the Isles of Shoals ten miles off the Maine coast. Some of the guests over the years included Hawthorne, Emerson, Holmes, Whittier, Lowell, Aldrich, Mrs. Stowe, and Miss Jewett, as well as many eminences from the worlds of art, music, theatre, science, and the university.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



Annie Adams Fields to Mary Rice Jewett

Tuesday Eveg

[ 1899 or later]

Dear Mary:

    I was very sorry for all your trouble, but I rejoice to think that tonight Theodore* will be at home who will help to make things right.  I looked for you with little Timmy* in hand each evening, but from your not coming I began to think the trouble was virtually at an end.  I suppose it was some ignorant man who was frightened about his child.

[ Page 2 ]

But I cannot [wonder corrected ] at your discomfort and I shall look for the little doggie in case the man turns up which I devoutly hope he never will do.

    I could not believe my eyes when the yellow lilies came today close upon the lovely flowers of yesterday.  They all came in perfect order.  Sarah* drove down this afternoon with Mrs. Whitman.  She is coming again when she will have

[ Page 3 ]

a quiet moment to enjoy the lilies fully I hope.

    How good about the French! I wish I had as good a chance for we are getting a little French color here this season and I am not proud of my rusty tongue.

    Give my true and best regard to Katie* -- and my love.  She is a dear soul.

    And now, good night dear Mary.  Tell Tim


[ Page 4 ]

never, never to give you such a fright again.

    I shall go to Mrs. Cabots* to luncheon on Friday and I hope on the 10th Sarah will be on the wing once more.

Affectionately yours
Annie Fields

I can seem to see the garden.  How beautiful the flowers are.  By the way did your [Chorca Panglas]* come up.  I have to plant

[ Up the right margin of page 4 ]

now and can give you more seeds another year.

[ Up the left margin of page 1 ]

The vine is "Lophospermum scandens"* which means nothing [unrecognized, perhaps deleted word ] nor

[ Up the right margin of page 1 ]

can I find it in Gray*

Notes

1899 or later:  This date is based upon the belief that the letter refers to Katie Galvin, who came to work for the Jewetts in 1899.

Theodore
: Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

Timmy:  A Jewett family dog. Details of this incident remain unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Sarah:  Sarah Orne Jewett. See Correspondents.

Katie:  Probably Katie Galvin. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Cabot:  Susan Burley Cabot. See Correspondents.

Chorca panglas: This is what the two words look like, but clearly there is no such garden plant.  Assistance is welcome.

Lophospermum scandens:  "Lophospermum scandens is a ... climbing herbaceous perennial native to south central Mexico, with red-violet and white tubular flowers and toothed heart-shaped leaves."

Gray:  Probably Fields refers to Manual of Botany of the Northern United States, from New England to Wisconsin and South to Ohio and Pennsylvania Inclusive, by Asa Gray (1810-1888).  First published in 1848, the manual went through numerous editions.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in Letters from Annie Fields to Mary Rice Jewett, Jewett Family Papers: MS014.03.02.  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller. Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

    Friday [June 16 or 23, 1899]

Dearest Annie

    It is a cloudy morning a little cool and apprehensive to say the least, for Class day weather* -- And the Circus is coming to Berwick!  Yesterday was quite perfect.

    I mean to start Monday on my travels.  Tomorrow is the day when most of the places hotels & boarding houses open along shore

[ Page 2 ]

and Saturday is such a crowded day to start.  I mean to set sail for Boothbay, and if Mouse Island* is not available there is the other hotel over across which will do for a first stopping place at any rate.  I have times of feeling just like it, and other moments quite the reverse -- but -- I'm going.  It seems now and then as if I were foolish not to go right to Dunnet Landing* where I Know every body!  but after

[ Page 3 ]

all that wasn't the doctors prescription --

    *Our guests just spent the day yesterday so that I got on very well.  Mary* & I went to drive afterward --

    I send you Helens* dear & interesting letter --

    With much love your most [loving written over letters]

        Pinny

Notes

Class day:  Theodore Jewett Eastman (AB 1901), Jewett's nephew, was a sophomore at Harvard University in 1899.  According to the Chicago Tribune of Monday June 19, 1899 (p. 10), Harvard's Class Day Week opened on Sunday 18 June.  The Cambridge (MA) Tribune, XXII; 17, (24 June 1899, p. 4) reported that Class Week weather in 1899 was excellent.

Mouse Island:  A small resort island east of Southport and south of Boothbay, ME.

Dunnet Landing:  The fictional setting of Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896)

Our guests:  This and the following lines may not be new paragraphs, but Jewett sometimes uses large spaces between sentences to indicate new paragraphs.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Helen:  There are several Helens to whom Jewett may refer, though probably not her aunt, Helen Gilman, who would be called "Aunt Helen."  Perhaps she refers to Helen Merriman or Helen Choate Bell, both frequent correspondents.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields [Fragment]

[June 1899]


    I am getting the leather leaves* along but I cant find just the right gold stuff -- And I dont feel glad that I chose tulip tree leaves any way [y written over d] but you shall have better ones some day.  The Bocconia* looks quite beautiful by contrast but I found that I only had a little leather here.  You can use those three!  Thank you darling Fuff for sending Stubby's letter.*  I felt that it was just such a time!

[Unclear whether page 2 follows the previous one]

It is warmer again today -- but you will have a delicious breeze at Manchester.  Oh your long letter on the little sheets was perfectly lovely yesterday afternoon[.]  I had a real little feast of it -- I am so glad that you can get through the Grew place* and that you had the nice walk to the Shore darling Fuff.  You haven't seen Mr. Grew to meet this year.    And calls made! of such Fuffs there should be a song written!   Now I shall rest

[ Page 3 ]

awhile -- and then muster up to get down to the Bank.  The Charles Daltons are coming down to Hamilton House on Monday & Mary* is going down to tea --  I believe the Delands* are asked too but I dont know if they are coming.  Mary will hear about "Old Helen"* from the Daltons so now we are having plenty of newses. 

    Good bye with best love (and Oh, thinking so many times a day[)] from.

    Pinny

[In a box drawn in lower right corner]  Miss Cheyne is for debts: scissors & [unrecognized word] & etc & e


Notes

leather leaves:  In Novel Craft: Victorian Domestic Handicraft and Nineteenth-Century Fiction (2011), Talia Schaffer describes the Victorian craft of making leather leaves "which transforms imperfect living leaves into idealized leather specimens that are fixed forever in varnished, incised, solid arrangements" (p. 18).

The Bocconia
Wikipedia says: "Bocconia is a genus of flowering plants in the poppy family,"

Fuff ... Stubby:  "Fuff" is a Jewett nickname for Annie Fields, "Stubby" for her nephew, Theodore Eastman.  See Correspondents.

the Grew place:  Edward Sturgis Grew (1842-1916), a dry-goods merchant in Boston, built All Oakes (completed 1903) as a summer residence in Manchester by the Sea.  It appears that in 1899, Grew owned property between the Fields house and the sea, making it difficult to take walks along the shore without passing through the property.

Charles Daltons:  Though this is not certain, it seems likely that the Tyson's are expecting a visit from Sir Charles Dalton (1850 - 1933), "a Prince Edward Island businessman, politician and philanthropist" (Wikipedia).

Hamilton House:  Hamilton House is a historic late 18th-century estate and home in South Berwick, ME., now belonging to Historic New England:

In 1898, Jewett convinced her friend Emily Tyson, widow of the president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and her stepdaughter Elise Tyson (later Mrs. Henry G. Vaughan) to purchase the house. The Tysons were part of a new wave of summer residents who were caught up in the Colonial Revival romance of owning country houses which reflected the grace and prosperity of colonial forbears and provided a healthful rural retreat away from the heat and pollution of cities.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Delands: While this is not certain, it is likely that the Delands are the author Margaret Deland (1857-1945) and her husband, Lorin F. Deland.

"Old Helen":  The identity of this "Old Helen" is uncertain.  However, see SOJ to Sarah Wyman Whitman August 4, [1903], in which Cary identifies "Old Helen" as Helen Bigelow Merriman.  See Correspondents.

Miss Cheyne is for debts:  The identity of Miss Cheyne is unknown, though it appears she may be a source for sewing or craft supplies. Perhaps Jewett has enclosed a cheque.

The manuscript of these pages is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

    Saturday  [June 17 or 24, 1899]

Dearest dear Annie

    Yesterday I sent you the leather leaves.*  I am disappointed in the Bocconia* after all.  I think that a [solider ? ] -- a less cut leaf is much handsomer.  The paper pattern is charming but the leather to my eyes less so -- When I come I'll cut some more for you to make up the set, but you can do with these for a while, at any rate with white things at the table ends even if you have

[ Top left margin of page 1; vertical ]

I should like to say something toward the poor things who "got off" from Ward VII last week.*

[ Page 2 ]

a good big party!  Yesterday we all went to the circus over where  you & I went once -- It was the coolest and best of days and we had remarkably comfortable seats and made a noble row of four with 2 Tysons* only {;} we longed in both heart & speech for you and Stubby* -- I never saw a better show! the people so interesting looking.  I always pick out certain ones that I get so interested about.  Katy & Jane* went and Katy had the best time since she was a

[ Page 3 ]

little girl!  and Mrs. Tyson "paid in" a lot of little boys and Joe (the gardener) & his old Mary* were at a short distance.  It was a great moment! -- Afterward we came [back ?] & started to have a cupper tea but we were all so hungry that we continued our meal and called on Katy for further supplies{,} having had a very very early dinner and it was one of the cosiest of times.  The Tysons got

[ Page 4 ]

off soon afterward to start their family for the evening performance.  It was so amusing and delightful, and irresponsible in its joys!  I did miss you dreadfully. --.  And on this morning what a tired Pinny!  but she will stay in bed later and is not hurt in life or limb but thought she had come most to an end when she was a waking up.  Fuff not to scold her.  I know she will not, for Mary wouldn't have gone and it was so good for all of us[.]

[3 circled on bottom left of the page.]


Notes

leather leaves:  In Novel Craft: Victorian Domestic Handicraft and Nineteenth-Century Fiction (2011), Talia Schaffer describes the Victorian craft of making leather leaves "which transforms imperfect living leaves into idealized leather specimens that are fixed forever in varnished, incised, solid arrangements" (p. 18).

The Bocconia
Wikipedia says: "Bocconia is a genus of flowering plants in the poppy family,"

who "got off" from Ward VII last week:  Boston's Seventh Ward, adjacent to Boston Common, was a wealthy part of Boston in 1899, and may well have included the home of Annie Fields.  To whom, exactly, Jewett refers is unclear, but it may be herself, as she has been ill and is planning a physician-prescribed stay at Mouse Island.

2 Tysons:  Hamilton House is a historic late 18th-century estate and home in South Berwick, ME., now belonging to Historic New England:

In 1898, Jewett convinced her friend Emily Tyson, widow of the president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and her stepdaughter Elise Tyson (later Mrs. Henry G. Vaughan) to purchase the house. The Tysons were part of a new wave of summer residents who were caught up in the Colonial Revival romance of owning country houses which reflected the grace and prosperity of colonial forbears and provided a healthful rural retreat away from the heat and pollution of cities.

Stubby:  "Stubby" is a nickname for her nephew, Theodore Eastman, who has just completed his sophomore year at Harvard University.  See Correspondents.

Katy & Jane:  Jewett family employees.  Katy Galvin is newly arrived from Ireland.  See Correspondents.
    More information is welcome.

Joe (the gardener) & his old Mary:  It is not clear whether Joe and Mary work for the Jewetts, for the Tysons, or for someone else.  Joe is mentioned in other letters as a presumably temporary driver for the Jewetts, perhaps after the death of John Tucker in 1902.  More information is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.


SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

[June 1899]

Thursday Morning

No pens & inks for Pinnys on the morning blanket and sheet any more so that you will have do with a pencil. What beautiful bright weather with a fine (westering) wind! The poplar leaves shine in the sun quite wonderful as I look out and I can see the green top of the hill. yesterday morning we took a good drive going first to Hamilton House where we found Elise and Peggy! Mrs. Tyson* having gone to town but she came back just before [seven or eleven] and the girls having gone to meet her they all put in for a call and we didn’t go into the house at all but sat in the garden and had a nice time. There is a quite enchanting [litter on?] table out there now which you would like. The red lilies are quite splendid and the peonies not gone yet, and such nice lettuces in the garden that I wish you had a good half of them this minute! I feel far far better! this morning but yesterday was most terrible tired and discouraged for poor P. L.* and she didn’t know what she was ever a going to do but slept better last night and things look quite possible. I have talked with Mary about going away & she is full of approval, so I shall be off before long perhaps Monday and perhaps before. I am looking for a letter from you this morning -- Oh darling Fuff I do hope that you are well and not too lonely. I hope you find company enough in your Hawthorne books until Mark & Fanny can come.* It must be bright and shining on the dear hill* this morning. I can see the walnut tree and the two cherries and all the crabs! and all the round nasturtium leaves as if I were there. There is some "company" come today.  We could wish it otherwise, but Mary will give them a nice drive -- a McHenry cousin (& his wife)* whom we haven’t seen for a long time. the wife we have never seen.

          Dear Fuffy I hoped to have sent the leaves* right back but I found that the gold paint here wasn’t the right kind. I think that I may be able to hunt up some at one of the stores.

          With dear love Pinny --
 
 

Notes

Hamilton House ... Elise and Peggy! Mrs. Tyson:  Hamilton House is a historic late 18th-century estate and home in South Berwick, ME., now belonging to Historic New England:

In 1898, Jewett convinced her friend Emily Tyson, widow of the president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and her stepdaughter Elise Tyson (later Mrs. Henry G. Vaughan) to purchase the house. The Tysons were part of a new wave of summer residents who were caught up in the Colonial Revival romance of owning country houses which reflected the grace and prosperity of colonial forbears and provided a healthful rural retreat away from the heat and pollution of cities.

The Tysons hired Herbert Browne of the Boston architectural firm Little and Browne to oversee some interior changes and to design additions to the west and east sides of the house. The Tysons also embarked on creating a grand Colonial Revival-style garden at the east side of the house encircled by an elaborate pergola. All major work was completed by 1900. Important additions to the property made in the following decade included murals painted in the parlor and dining room of the house by George Porter Fernald and the construction of a charming garden cottage fitted with interior paneling salvaged from a colonial home in Newington, New Hampshire. Luckily, Elise Tyson was an accomplished amateur photographer whose photographs of interior and garden views provide a rare and wonderful documentation of the early years the ladies spent at the property.

After her stepmother’s death in 1922, Elise Tyson Vaughan and her husband Henry Vaughan (married 1915) were encouraged by William Sumner Appleton, the founder of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, now Historic New England, to keep the house.

The identity of Peggy is not known.  Assistance is welcome.

P. L.:  Pinny Lawson is one of Jewett's nicknames.

The red lilies are quite splendid:  Retired Historic New England gardener, Nancy Wetzel, identifies three kinds lilies to which Jewett may refer: 

There are two wild lilies -- true Lilium  -- of Maine that can be red and bloom in June.  Wild plants often were used in cultivated gardens of Jewett’s day.  The gardener might transplant or collect seed from the wild or purchase these from a nursery catalog.

    Lilium canadense, Canada lily. Blossoms may be yellow or red.  See Roger Tory Peterson, A Field Guide to Wildflowers.  Flowers are like nodding bells. 

  Lilium philadelphicum, Philadelphia lily, also named common red lily and wood lily. See Peterson.  This flower is upward facing.  

A third possibility is a cultivated variety that originated in Siberia, Lilium pumilum, coral lily, which was introduced to the American market in 1812.   It was available in several New England nursery catalogs in Jewett’s day, including Hovey & Company, Boston, which listed it in 1866. In  Restoring American Gardens, Denise Wiles Adams says: “By mid-nineteenth century, plant explorers had introduced many new species of Lilium from the western United States and the Orient, and the American nursery trade was quick to supply the latest finds to gardeners."    These lilies typically were used in borders and shrubberies.

In her own garden, Jewett also grew the scarlet Lychnis chalcedonica, London pride, another native of of Siberia.
Canada Lily

Two images of Canada Lily
Canada Lily 2

Philadelphia Lily

Philadelphia Lily above
Wikipedia

Coral Lily right
Old House Gardens

Coral Lily

Hawthorne books until Mark & Fanny:  Fields published Hawthorne in 1899, dating her preface in September. Writer and editor, Mark Antony De Wolfe Howe  (1864 - 1960) was married to Fanny Huntington Quincy (1870 - 1933), of the literary and reformist Quincy family.  She also was a writer.  He published Memories of a Hostess (1922), a selection from the diaries of Annie Fields.

the hill:  The Fields house in Manchester by the Sea stands on Thunderbolt Hill.

a McHenry cousin (& his wife):  Tracing Jewett genealogy is quite complicated, but it seems clear that the Jewett sisters were connected with some McHenrys through their grandmother, Sarah Orne.  It appears that the Odiorne Bible (pp. 16-17) was passed to Sarah Orne, daughter of Sarah Moore Orne, upon her death in 1875, then to her daughter, Roxalene Orne (1818-1887), who had married Alexander R. McHenry (1814 - 1874)..  
    Their only married and living son in 1899 was Edward Orne McHenry (1855-1910); his spouse was Hannah Mason Smyth McHenry (1863 - 1917).  While this is only speculation, there is at least some probability that these were the cousins who visited the Jewetts this spring in South Berwick.

the leaves:  Jewett has been working at handcrafted "leather leaves."  See above SOJ to Annie Adams Fields, Saturday  [June 17 or 24, 1899].

The ms. of this letter is held by the Houghton Library of Harvard University: bms Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


            Friday morning [June 1899]

Dear Annie

            I feel so humbled by the remembrance of all my ink going over the bed yesterday morning that you will have to accept a pencil instead of a pen!  And at this moment comes Mary* smiling with the aforesaid inkbottle safely bestowed in a flat high-sided Japanese dish, but I shall keep on --  I seem to have dropped down into a poor time again but you know I never feel very

[ Page 2 ]

energetic early in the morning (like some persons!) and I shall be up soon and doing the best I can -- I didn't go to drive yesterday -- it is so dusty just now and was had such a long drive the day before -- but Mary was busy in her room making the new cover for her big chair which you will have to admire deeply -- it is a great success.  As for me I did something to a dress of hers -- the neck wanted some rearranging.  A

[ Page 3 ]

great Pinny* at such works when she gets her noble mind upon them. ----

    Oh how beautiful it must be at Manchester this morning, and I dont doubt you will be dealing with nasturtiums -- I can hardly wait to see you dear Fuff* --  O don't put off coming again, it seems as if I couldn't wait at all when I think of it ---- And as if I should feel so much better when

[ Page 4 ]

you get here.  So tell me all about everything.  Can you [see written over something] anything of my little sprig of a cherry tree in the rock?  What about William's setter.*  You know we were going to book him.
 
    -- I hope to get your letter early today -----  Oh yes I look forward to going back with you[.]  I do hope nothing will prevent[.]  With best

love Pinny

Mary always sends love.  She is always talking about your coming --

[9 circled in lower left corner of page 4.]


Notes

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Pinny
:  Pinny Lawson is one of Jewett's nicknames.

Fuff:  One of Annie Fields' nicknames.

William's setter ... book him:  This reference remains mysterious.  Fields may have employed a man named William.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

            Mouse Island
                Tuesday

Dear Annie

            This place of our hearts is quite unchanged.  The path through the fir balsams as you come up from the whart and the stone cottages and the green field sloping down to the water and the red light on Burnt Island a little way across.  The sunset last night and the fragrance of the woods and the song sparrows and the peoples voices coming across the water all just as we [want ?] to see and hear them.  I found

[ Page 2 ]

that the hotel was n't really open and two passengers who landed when I did had to go in a row boat across to "Boothbay Harbor" but I took the proprietor apart and snatched a word with him, and so he took me in and I was glad enough being pretty tired by that time, and I am all established -- one of the rooms in the cottage, the one opposite ours' a nice little place enough looking between the spruce tops across the bay.  After I had my supper last night I sat on a warm old ledge in the field near the water and felt a deep sense of the loveliness of this

[ Page 3 ]

world! and then I went strawberrying in the long grass and then I went back through the woods to the landing  because the sunset was most uncommon beautiful and I sat there until it was time to come back and light my lamp and go to bed.  These are all my travels --  The hotel will "open" soon, ^perhaps tomorrow^ but you mustn't be alarmed if letters are not very regular.  There seems to be an intermittent casual kind of service between here and Boothbay but there'll be chances enough to send [presently ?].  I long to hear from you and

[ Page 4 ]

how you get on.  I needn't say how I miss you in this place which we found together.  I shall stay on, for the present at any rate{,} it is as good as anything and the air salt and balsam firry as possible.

        With dearest love
                your
                Pinny

Please give my best remembrances to Miss Quincy.*

There are new people here, but good-natured as can be!


Notes

Miss Quincy:  It is likely that this is Fanny Huntington Quincy (1870–1933), who married Mark Antony De Wolfe Howe on 21 September 1899.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

                Thursday morning

Dearest Annie,

        Yesterday nobody went across the bay for the mail and I dont know about today but I seem to have a great deal to write!  I had a beautiful piece of a morning in the woods ^yesterday^ which are a great deal more lovely than I remembered them.  The spruces and firs well grown overhead and plenty of young bright green ones for underbrush with their new tips just growing out. I have got "a burrow along the shore" like William in the pointed firs.*  And I stay out of doors nearly every minute -- but yesterday it grew greyer and

[ Page 2 ]

greyer overhead until I heard a solemn and strangely loud sound of summer rain and had to hurry under cover.  When I first went out after breakfast I came upon an old hen partridge with a lot of little chickens among the little green firs and this being a great event, is my chief news!  I am going to the same region to sit very still and see her 'go by' but with less haste than yesterday when there was a loud fluster!

    It rained all day after that and I stayed in my room sewing and looking at the harbour [last two letters corrected] to see

[ Page 3 ]

the old schooners putting in out of the bad weather -- lots of them yesterday -- and one particularly nice old one with a green hull much weather beaten, and her sails so patched that I think the capin's wife & maiden sister must have been all winter patching and darning them.  -- I was so excited by all these things that I got sleepy and took a nap of nearly two hours.

    -- I don't know when such a thing ever happened before.  The air is really so bracing that I couldn't breathe quite well

[ Page 4 ]

enough at [first written over letters]  and [thought written over letters] I should fall into a bad aching again but today I am much better and the sun is out and I feel in good trim.  I almost dread having anybody else come!  [but written over letters?] quite understand some of poor Joanna's feelings on Shellheap island -- after she forgot what sent her there and got to neighbouring with the birds.*  This is a most lovely place.  I keep saying to myself -- I am sure that I shall get a letter from you today dear.  I send Lily Nortons* which is quite delightful.

    With a heart full of love.  P. L.

[8 circled in another hand, lower left of p. 3.]

Notes

pointed firs:  William Blackett is the brother of Almira Todd, the narrator's landlady in Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896).

poor Joanna's feelings:   Joanna, the subject of several chapters in Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs, becomes a hermit on a solitary island after a disappointment in love.

Lily Nortons:  Elizabeth (Lily) Gaskell Norton. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Mouse Island

Sunday morning
[ Near July 1, 1899 ]

Dear Mary

            ------------------- They dont seem to wilt in sea air which is a great point.  I saw the little steamer come wading in from Monhegan at the close of day yesterday in all the wind with a kind of trysail up and looking as if she had hard work not to roll over, with considerable top hamper and no width of beam. -------------------------------------------------


Notes

Near July 1, 1899:  This tentative date is based upon other letters recounting Jewett's physician prescribed rest stay by herself at Mouse Island before the season of regular summer visitors.
     The hyphens at the beginning and end indicate this is an incomplete transcription.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


 SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Monday evening
[ 3 July 1899 ]

Mouse Island

Dear Mary

            ‘Irvin’* has gone to the Harbor,* but I fear me that it will be a very late mail the night before the Fourth!  I shall just send a word tonight for I dont feel sure of Fourth of July boats and mails.  It has been a lovely day but hotter than usual and after my usual morning in the woods I took a nap and read and sewed a little until supper time.  The bay is perfectly still -- an old big schooner has been ever so long drifting up with the tide.  She stood ever so long quite wistful at the mouth of the harbor with a disappointed droop to her sails but now she is drifting along.  It is so funny to hear Fourth of July horns out in boats, but distance does lend a little enchantment.  You were good to send the last Letter.  This is just the place to read one all through.  Have you sent the post card to stop W. D. Jewett’s subscription to the Congregationalist!!!*  I should like to see you square up to the desk to write it.  Love to you & Stubbs* and all the family.  I wrote Mrs. Tyler* a letter last night which I have been meaning to do ever since she went away after the visit and now it is done.

Good night

                                         from

                                                Sarah

 

Notes

'Irvin' ... Harbor: The identity of this person is not yet known.  The Harbor is Boothbay Harbor, near Mouse Island, ME.

W. D. Jewett’s subscription to the Congregationalist: William Durham Jewett died in 4 August 1887.  It appears that the sisters continued his subscription to this weekly paper, in which Jewett had published a series of pieces in the 1880s, for twelves years after his death.

Stubbs: Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Tyler: Augusta Maria Denny Tyler.  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


            Sunday. [around July 4, 1899] Mouse Island  [Mouse underlined twice]

Dearest Annie

        The wind has been blowing and blustering all day long so that I long for the sun to go down and stop it!  I sat out in the woods, & walked, as usual all the morning and I had to hunt for a little place out of the bluster [and corrected] among the little fir balsams, but this afternoon I have stayed in and read the Atlantic & some newspapers.  Mary sent Mr. Bonapartes speech* with great delight & interest and I have read most of it, and the pieces of Owen Wisters poem.*  What a

[ Page 2]

lovely verse next to the end!

"Oh my dear better angel and my Star" --

I am sure that you liked it, as if we had read it together.  Thank you for sending "Charlie's" book* along -- it is just the time to read it and I set tomorrow for the day.  This morning I had a little copy of Wordsworth in the woods and it seemed after all these years and readings, as if I read even 'At the corner of Wood Street' -- for the first time.

    A good many people came yesterday & this morning so that I begin to feel a little like the old partridge, and as if I liked it better to have the island to myself.  There is the bell for

[ Page 3]

supper and I must put on another dress and shoes.

                --- The great affair is now accomplished and now that I come back to my window and my little table it seems quieter as if the old wind were quieting down --

    -- Tomorrow I shall have been here a week and it seems quite as long -- the first two days very long indeed but that was to be expected.  Dr. Williams* that two weeks would be more than twice as good as one and so I am settling down to the second with composure.  I love this island, but I fear that it will be quite a comedown no longer to  have it for my own!  I have tried to write

[ Page 4]

just as little as I possibly could and to do all I could to get the best of such a proceeding.  I am guilty in the matter of rubbers, but I brought my old Russia leather shoes* that I had on the yacht with rubber soles and they are ample provision for the gravel walk to the wharf where I walked after the rain.  Sometimes I wish that I were in a little plain house on a green hillside, with a good sea view instead of this little good enough hotel = but it is really a place to send some one to new and then.  Miss Smith,* now, would like it if she were coming to the sea.  Cap'n Free* turned up today at last, and was full of inquiries about Alice.  I have been waiting to see him to write her

[13 circled in left bottom corner of page 3, in another hand]

[ Page 4]

a note from here which will amuse her indeed. 

    Do give my love to dear Alice Howe.*  I am going to write ot her, too.  Jessie* told us she had promised a visit in Rome, to Cliffs.  I suppose she will stay till the last minute in Louisville -- naturally, and then always be in a hurry.  Though I dont suppose she will wish to get back to Rome too early unless she has made late autumn plans over there.  Oh, your notepaper letter of last night was perfectly dear and beautiful!  I did enjoy every word of it.  I particularly wanted to hear

[Page 5]

more about the great call on Mrs. Cabot.*  I wonder if she is waiting to hear from me about my going there?  We left it, that she was to arrange about some other visits, and then let me know.  So [it with a line perhaps through the word] is really "her play" -- but we can let it go along.  Think of it being July already!  I am so sorry about Cassie's foot.  Do have her rub it with Ponds Extract.  And William with tonsillitis, and Pinny down east.  Oh what a poor plagued little Fuff.*  How does your reading get on?  On how I wish you could sit out of doors a whole morning and read your Wordsworth but when I come, why then you shall!  I begin to feel much better as I think of it!

        Goodnight dear with best love
            from P. L.

[13 circled in left bottom corner of page 4, in another hand]

[Written up the left margin of page 1; not clear whether this is a postscript or is intended to be inserted at some point on p. 1.]

I sat and watched a dear Sandpiper for friendships sake a long time the other afternoon.  [Their ?] little cry always seems like C. T.* speaking when I first hear it.


Notes

Mr. Bonapartes speech ... Owen Wister's poem ... "Oh my dear better angel and my Star":  Mary Rice Jewett has sent her sister materials from the June 29, 1899 meeting of Harvard's Phi Beta Kappa chapter.  The Harvard Graduates Magazine 8 (September 1899), pp. 104-5, reports on this meeting.  Charles Eliot Norton, the president, was reelected to his position.  Owen Wister (See Correspondents) was made an honorary member.  After a business meeting, the group adjourned to the Sanders Theater, where "Orator of the Day," Charles J. Bonaparte '71, and "Poet of the Day," Owen Wister '82, among others, made presentations.  HGM reports that both presenters expressed their "opinions on the stirring political questions of the day."
    Wikipedia says: "Charles Joseph Bonaparte (June 9, 1851 - June 28, 1921) was an American lawyer and political activist for progressive and liberal causes. Originally from Baltimore, Maryland, he served in the cabinet of the 26th U.S. President, Theodore Roosevelt."  He is considered to be the founder of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
    His 1899 PBK oration was entitled "Our National Dangers."  Joseph B. Bishop in Charles Joseph Bonaparte, his Life and Public Services
(1922) presents an excerpt: 
Washington affirms that 'virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government.' We have abandoned the government he founded to the Boss and the Ring. These powers of darkness would have men ignorant and vicious, pressed by want and rebellious to law, because of such men they make their dupes and tools. They are the common enemies of all who war against sin and suffering, for amid a people happy through righteousness they could not live. They protect and foster every degrading pursuit, every noxious industry, every dangerous and shameful calling, as training-schools  for their followers and resources for their [fisc] use. We know them and their works, yet we endure them as our rulers, and we have endured them for many weary years: it is as true now as it was when Burke said it, that 'there never was long a corrupt government of a virtuous people.'  (81-2)
    Owen Wister's poem presents something of a mystery.  His PBK poem was entitled, "My Country."  Supposedly the poem was published in Harper's Weekly 43 (July 1, 1899), pp. 640-1, and it does appear there in 33 stanzas.  Percy T. Magan and C. S. May review the poem favorably in their anti-imperialist book, Imperialism Versus the Bible: the Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence; Or, The Peril of the Republic of the United States (1899), pp. 132-4.  They note that the poem is structured as a dialogue between Columbia and Uncle Sam.  They begin quoting at stanza 47 and end with stanza 57.  In neither of these publications does Jewett's quotation from the poem appear.  The quotation does appear in another favorable notice in The Unitarian Register, (July 6, 1899), p. 760.  This newspaper published four stanzas, none of which appear in the other publications.
       It has not, therefore, been determined as yet how long the poem was, which stanzas Jewett saw and where they came from, and where those stanzas appeared in the poem as a whole.  The stanza from which she quotes seems distant from the topic of the political issues troubling the United States; it appears that Uncle Sam may address Columbia here:
O my dear better Angel and my star,
     My earthly sight needs yours, your heavenly, mine!
 I am your flesh, and you my spirit are:
   I were too gross alone, you, too divine!
   Parted, I'd fall in dust, and you would shine
 In voiceless ether. Therefore we unite
 To walk on earth together, that we walk aright.

"Charlie's" book:  This must be speculative, but among the writers intimate enough with Fields and Jewett to be known as "Charlie" would be Charles Dudley Warner, whose novel That Fortune appeared in 1899.  This assumes that the book is by "Charlie" rather than connected with him in some other way.

Wordsworth ...  'At the corner of Wood Street':  The English poet, William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 - 23 April 1850) composed "The Reverie for Poor Susan" in 1797. 

      AT the corner of Wood Street, when daylight appears,
      Hangs a Thrush that sings loud, it has sung for three years:
      Poor Susan has passed by the spot, and has heard
      In the silence of morning the song of the Bird.

      Tis a note of enchantment; what ails her? She sees
      A mountain ascending, a vision of trees;
      Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide,
      And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside.

      Green pastures she views in the midst of the dale,
      Down which she so often has tripped with her pail;
      And a single small cottage, a nest like a dove's,
      The one only dwelling on earth that she loves.

      She looks, and her heart is in heaven: but they fade,
      The mist and the river, the hill and the shade:
      The stream will not flow, and the hill will not rise,
      And the colours have all passed away from her eyes!

Dr. Williams:  Perhaps the most prominent Dr. Williams practicing in Boston at this time was Francis Henry Williams (1852-1936), who was making his name at Boston City Hospital in the 1890s for developing ways of using x-rays for chest scans.  However, it seems unlikely that he would be been treating Jewett and Fields in general practice.

Russia leather shoes: Wikipedia says: "Russia leather is a particular form of bark-tanned cow leather. It is distinguished by a later processing step, after tanning, where birch oil is worked into the rear face of the leather. This gives a leather that is particularly hard-wearing, flexible and resistant to water.[1] The oil impregnation also deterred insect attack."

Miss Smith:  This person has not been identified.  It appears Jewett exchanged letters with Miss Frances M. Smith, probably the author of  Talks with Homely Girls on Health and Beauty (1885), Colonial Families of America (1909), and About Our Ancestors (1919). Assistance is welcome.

Cap'n Free:  Probably this is Captain Free McKown, known in the Mouse Island area at the turn of the twentieth century for his clambakes and for providing transportation in his boat, Edith.  Though little has been discovered about him, he is mentioned in The Boy Patrol Around the Council Fire (1913) by Edward Sylvester Ellis (Chapter 17) and The Latchstring to Maine Woods and Waters (1916) by Walter Crane Emerson (p. 123).

Alice Howe ... Jessie ... Cliffs:  Alice Greenwood Howe's summer home was "The Cliffs" in Manchester. MA.  Pianist Jessie Cochrane was a frequent guest of Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Cabot:  Susan Burley Cabot.  See Correspondents.

Cassie's foot... Pond's Extract:  Cassie seems to be a Fields employee.  Wikipedia says: "Pond's Cream was invented in the United States as a patent medicine by pharmacist Theron T. Pond (1800 - 1852) of Utica, New York, in 1846. Mr. Pond extracted a healing tea from witch hazel which he discovered could heal small cuts and other ailments. The product was named 'Golden Treasure.' After Theron died, it would be known as 'Pond's Extract.'"

William with tonsillitis:  William may be a Fields employee.  It may be his setter mentioned in SOJ to Annie Adams Fields Friday morning [June 1899].  And see SOJ to Annie Adams Fields  Monday Morning [July 1899].

Fuff:  One of Annie Fields' nicknames.

P. L.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

Sandpiper ... C. T.:  Celia Thaxter.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields


        Friday Morning  [July 7, 1899]

Dearest Annie

        I think there is plenty of daylight to get my little letter written this time.  It is a clear lovely night quite cool enough and salt into the bargain, in place of the very sticky tiresome heat of two days past, with wet wood into which a poor Pinny* couldn't get out.  I felt quite downhearted, quite to the end of everything last night, and could

[ Page 2 ]

hardly face the rest of the summer at all.  In one way I mind being alone less than most people do, but when you dont feel very well you are so glad to have a Fuff* at hand and a Mary* and not [to written over say ] dwell upon the matter further, you dont like so well to be away from home & alone.  But a great Pinny writes you tonight compared to last night!  I hope you had a good visit from Guy Murchie?*  I like him so much and I wish I could have been there when

[ Page 3 ]

he came.  How nice it was to ask Mrs. Fiske* and how it warmed her heart!  When I get home I shall try to go to York for a day, to see Mrs. Lawrence* if for nothing else.  And I want to take Mary* & go to Ogunquit to see Susy Woodbury's new house* &c: we have never been.  I must try to do these things and keep out of doors and in The Air! and get toughened up a little to doing things again.  But you may be sure I shall get over to see you

[ Page 4 ]
before very very long Miss Fuffy!

    Somehow it seems like Saturday night and the bay looks all smooth for Sunday.  I am sure you will be sitting out, and I can think myself with you on the back piazza.
    How nice about Mr. Eaton's message and his anxiety about it!  You must tell him I was much pleased.  It was nice to go there for the Fourth.*

    Good night dearest Annie with so many things left unsaid, or rather all said but not written --

    Your most loving
            Pin


Notes

July 7, 1899
:  It seems likely that this letter belongs to the series Jewett wrote while recuperating from illness at Mouse Island, Maine.  As the letter indicates the Fourth has passed, the following Friday would be 7 July.

Pinny
:  Pinny and Pin are nicknames Annie and Sarah use for Sarah.

Fuff:  Fuff and Fuffy are nicknames Annie and Sarah use for Annie Fields.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.
 
Guy Murchie:  Guy Murchie, Sr., "was a graduate of Harvard Law School, a ... member of Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders, a U.S. Marshall, and a prominent Boston attorney who at one time served as attorney to Winston Churchill. Sitting President Theodore Roosevelt and his wife attended Guy Jr.'s christening."  He married "Ethel A. Murchie -- who designed the interior of a seaplane for Sikorksy Aircraft." Their multi-talented son, Guy Murchie, Jr. (January 1907 - 1997), became a well-known journalist for the Chicago Tribune and a writer about the Bahá'í Faith.

Mrs. Fiske:  It is not yet known which Mrs. Fiske may be meant here.  Jewett and Fields knew Gertrude Hubbard Horsford (Mrs. Andrew) Fiske and also Jewett's relatives, Ruth Tucker (Mrs. William Perry) Fiske, and Abigail (Mrs. Frank) Fiske.  Which of these women was living in 1899 also remains unknown.  Further information is welcome.

York ... Mrs. Lawrence:  There are two Mrs. Lawrences who are likely candidates.
    "William Lawrence (1850–1941) was elected as the 7th Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts (1893-1927). Lawrence was the son of the notable textile industrialist Amos Adams Lawrence and a member of the influential Boston family, founded by his great-grandfather and American revolutionary, Samuel Lawrence. His grandfather was the famed philanthropist Amos Lawrence"  (Wikipedia).  He and his wife, Julia (1853?-1900), summered in York, ME.
    Elizabeth Chapman Lawrence (1825-1905) was the second wife of Timothy Bigelow Lawrence.  See notes for SOJ to Sara Norton, September 16, 1908, and E.L., the Bread Box Papers: The High Life of a Dazzling Victorian Lady: a Biography of Elizabeth Chapman Lawrence (1983) by Helen Hartman Gemmill.  Daughter of Henry Chapman (1804-1891), a Pennsylvania congressman, she was a popular and cosmopolitan woman who, after her marriage, moved in the same circles as Annie Fields and Jewett and corresponded with Sarah Wyman Whitman.

Susy Woodbury's new house:  Susan Marcia Oakes Woodbury.  See Correspondents.

Mr. Eaton's message:  According to Judith Roman in Annie Adams Fields (1990), Georgiana Godland Eaton was a neighbor and friend of Fields in Manchester by the Sea (p. 38).  It seems likely that Roman meant to name Georgiana Goddard Eaton (1857-1911).  This relationship connects Fields with two likely Mr. Eatons who might want a message conveyed to Jewett: William Storer Eaton (1817-1902), brother of Georgiana, and his son William Storer Eaton (1854-1949).  The younger Mr. Eaton married after Jewett's death and maintained homes in Lakeville and Middleboro, MA as well as in Boston.  Whether he or his father owned either of the village homes in 1899 is not known.  Presumably, if one of these is the correct Mr. Eaton, such a home would be a good site for celebrating July 4, 1899.  It has not been confirmed that any of these Eatons had a home in the Manchester area, but if Roman is correct, Fields may have spent the Fourth with Eatons there..

The manuscript of this letter is held in Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

        Mouse Island
            Sunday 10 July [1899]

Dearest Annie

    I have had a lot of letters to write this [afternoon corrected] -- but I did not mean to leave yours until the last -- when I was tired!  My chief news is that Theodore* is coming tomorrow afternoon, so that I suppose I shall not get home before Wednesday at the least.  Now that the weather is bright and cool again I am very glad to have him.  I think he would have found himself dull this last week.  Don't write here again after you get this letter for the mails are so slow --

    I send some letters of yours which

[ Page 2 ]
   
I found in looking over things.  I brought some belated ones to answer, and I have had a little table going by the window which has been very comfy, with a dear picture of Fuff* at the back of it to keep company.  Laura Richards* sent me a little note last night, by way of Berwick, to say that she was going to Monhegan this week, but I have written her to stop here first ---- I daresay my letter wont catch her in time.

                Oh

[ Page 3 ]

this is a lovely evening.  I wish you could see the Bay and all the schooners that have been spending Sunday in harbor.  [There ?] is a nice old green one with a rail around the deck painted white like a front yard fence! -- I went in a rowboat up 'the river' with Capin Free* this morning to see his wife & mother both nice creatures, but the mother delightful ----a little like 'Mrs. Todd' in spirit.*  There was a white fog this morning but

[ Page 4 ]

blowing about by that time and pretty clear before we came home so that I could see something of the view which is just what you always believed.  I began to long for a house in that immediate neighbourhood -- there is a nice old one not far away, so we must see sometime.  I am just beginning to enjoy things, besides that dear enjoyment of woods & quietness.  I shall have some good rows with Stubby.*  I like that better than sailing in my heart of hearts: going along by the green shores and seeing the little houses but oh you wouldn't guess how

[20 or 30 circled in another hand, bottom left of page 4]

[ Written up the left and top margins of page 1]

many new houses there are!  The capes where we used to see one or two or three are turned into villages now.  But it is all good for the island people.  With dearest love from your own P. L.


Notes

Theodore:  Nicknamed Stubby, Jewett's nephew, Theodore Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.

Fuff:  Jewett's nickname for Annie Fields.

Laura Richards:  Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards.  See Correspondents.

Capin Free:  Probably this is Captain Free McKown, known in the Mouse Island area at the turn of the twentieth century for his clambakes and for providing transportation in his boat, Edith.  Though little has been discovered about him, he is mentioned in The Boy Patrol Around the Council Fire (1913) by Edward Sylvester Ellis (Chapter 17) and The Latchstring to Maine Woods and Waters (1916) by Walter Crane Emerson (p. 123).

'Mrs. Todd':  The narrator's landlady and friend in Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896) and related tales.

P.L.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields



Mouse Island
    Tuesday
        11 July

[Begin letterhead]

South Berwick.
            Maine.

[End letterhead]



Dearest Annie

        Theodore* went off sailing after breakfast and I to my dear place in the woods and [when corrected] we "got in" at dinner time we found Laura Richards,* so dear and nice, & meaning to stay until morning, when she must go back on account of great festivities in Hallowell.*  We had a long sail all of us, this afternoon up to the head of Linekins bay* and there we landed and walked across

[ Page 2 ]

the fields by a pretty foot path, to a boat-builders [shop corrected ] -- and there Laura and I strolled back and Stubby and Cap'n Free went further.  We sat under a tree in a lovely place and [had corrected] a nice time together and bought some candy from a [deleted word] woman in a funny little addition to [her ?] house -- and then we sailed home again ^ not very exciting events^ but they took all the afternoon! -- Laura told me about the birthday and her feeling about what you said.  She said it "was the one thing,["] and her eyes filled

[ Page 3 ]

with tears.  She really could not speak about it, and [said ?] the had kept it before her on her table ever since.  She has been sitting in my room this evening and ^we^ have had a nice talk.  I am so glad she came down.  I feel quite tired as well as sleepy -- it has grown very cool tonight and a Pinny is d-r-o-w-s-y !

I hope to go home on Thursday. ---- Laura goes early tomorrow morning.  [Goodnight corrected] dear with best love from

            P. L.


Notes

Theodore:  Jewett's nephew, Theodore Jewett Eastman, nicknamed Stubby.  See Correspondents.

Laura Richards:  Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards.  Her birthday was 27 February. See Correspondents.

Hallowell:  Presumably, Jewett refers to Hallowell, ME, a village near Gardiner, ME.  The Richards family is associated with both villages as well as with nearby North Belgrade, ME, the location of the Richards' boys' camp, Camp Merryweather.

Linekins bay:  A resort a few miles east of Boothbay Harbor, ME

Cap'n Free:  Probably this is Captain Free McKown, known in the Mouse Island area at the turn of the twentieth century for his clambakes and for providing transportation in his boat, Edith.  Though little has been discovered about him, he is mentioned in The Boy Patrol Around the Council Fire (1913) by Edward Sylvester Ellis (Chapter 17) and The Latchstring to Maine Woods and Waters (1916) by W alter Crane Emerson (p. 123).

P. L.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

            Wednesday [13 July 1899]

[ Letterhead]

South Berwick, Maine

[ End letterhead ]


Dearest Annie

    It is just before tea and I must write a word of good bye from Mouse Island.  I am so eager to get home now though I had a letter just now from Dr. Williams* wishing me to stay three weeks but it only lacks half a week, and there are getting to be too many people here -- a boat load to call yesterday from Linekins Bay !!*

[ Page 2 ]

and though there was one very sweet woman among them, it kind of scared a poor Pinny.*  I really think that it is as well to go, and I shall try to be careful at home to make out the required time.  I got your dear note -- about Miss Irwin's* visit and the most successful and neighbourly Schlesinger tea* -- which was certainly a great satisfaction.

    -- I have got a lot of nice fir balsam tips to make you

[ Page 3 ]

a new pillow and I shall make a pretty bag for it as soon as possible. (I mean in inside cover.)  I suppose Mary* is having slow hours now until we get home.  She went to Portsmouth yesterday, to see Mrs. Knight &c. and came back in such a state of mind because George Haven has sold his the old house to Frank Jones and there were a lot of common people on the high steps!  It gives me a pang:

[ Page 4 ]

-- and I cant think of anybody but dear Mrs. Haven & Georgie looking out of the windows -- He seems to have so little Feeling!  But I dont know as it would please us any better to have him and his uninteresting crowd there.  So after all! but it was a home for gentle-folk.

    ----------------  Goodnight dear and it will be nice to feel so much nearer to you tomorrow night if all goes well

        Yours most lovingly

                P. L.

Notes

Dr. Williams:  Perhaps the most prominent Dr. Williams practicing in Boston at this time was Francis Henry Williams (1852-1936), who was making his name at Boston City Hospital in the 1890s for developing ways of using x-rays for chest scans.  However, it seems unlikely that he would be been treating Jewett and Fields in general practice.

Linekins Bay:  A resort a few miles east of Boothbay Harbor, ME

Pinny:  Pinny Lawson, P. L., one of Jewett's nicknames.

Miss Irwin's visit:  Probably Agnes Irwin (1841-1914), the first dean of Radcliffe College (1894-1909). 

Schlesinger tea: It seems reasonably likely that Fields has either attended or given a tea for Barthold and Mary (McBurney) Schlesinger.  Schlesinger (1828-1900) was a successful iron and steel merchant who built an impressive home, Southwood, in Brookline, MA and supported a number of local institutions.
     In Community by Design:The Role of the Frederick Law Olmsted Office in the Suburbanization of Brookline, Massachusetts, 1880 to 1936, Keith N. Morgan, Elizabeth Hope Cushing and Roger Reed say:
Even before deciding to move to Brookline, and specifically to Warren Street, Frederick Law Olmsted received a commission from one of his future neighbors. Barthold Schlesinger had come to the United States as a diplomat from Germany, then married a member of Boston society and gone into business there. As lovers of music and collectors of art, the Schlesingers became prominent in Boston and Brookline social circles, and their new Brookline estate, a showplace. (pp. 377-8)
See also Back Bay Houses.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Portsmouth ... Mrs. Knight:  The Knight family was large and prominent in the area of South Berwick during the 19th century.  This makes it difficult to be sure which Mrs. Knight Mary visited in nearby Portsmouth, NH.  Assistance is welcome.

George Haven ... Frank Jones ... Mrs. Haven & Georgie:   These people and their transactions have not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     Pride's Crossing1
     Beverly, Massachusetts
     July 29, [1899]

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     I am sorry to have kept your story so long, but I could not somehow get the right moment for a last reading, and to write to you. I have been moving about, and I have had to think much of other things.
     Yet I have thought much of this piece of work which on the whole I like much better than the other. It is better worked out and more sincerely felt. I find myself always thinking of it as "The Heart of Abijah" -- and you have certainly given a most touching picture of a true and dependent affection. It is most genuine and real. The one thing that I question is the episode of the new teeth: one cannot have a chance to smile in just that way at poor Abijah or to let him be even the least bit shocking to one's sense of good taste. You have written all the rest in such a different key, and keep your reader in a different atmosphere, and so I think the very truth of it strikes a wrong note of 'realism.'
     I think that one of the weekly magazines like the Independent of New York or the Outlook might like to print it. I have a great liking also for our good story-paper in Portland, the Portland Transcript. You may think that I am not choosing the best places, but I think that a sketch like this with all its good qualities does not exactly belong to the magazines as it is. I want you to print it, for I think nothing helps a writer like seeing his work in print. And I sincerely hope that you will go on and write more.

     With very kind regards to Mrs. Thaxter,
     Yours ever most truly,

     S. O. Jewett

     I think when the writer speaks of the hero, he should usually write his name in full -- leaving 'Bije' to be spoken by the characters.
     On p.12: I think that 'Bije' would not have been kept from going to the grave by the doctor's order, unless you had explained before that he was ill when he died, 'or something.' It would be the one thing that he insisted upon, it seems to me.


Notes

See Richard Cary. "Jewett on Writing Short Stories." Colby Library Quarterly 10 (June 1964): 425-440.

     1 Site of Susan Burley Cabot's summer home, which had a separate post-office but was a part of Beverly. Miss Jewett spent a period each summer with her friend, who, though an invalid confined to bed, made the days interesting with conversation and the evenings lively with backgammon. Miss Jewett was totally at home with Mrs. Cabot, considering her house "unlike any other, with a sense of space and time and uninterruptedness." (Fields, Letters, 124.)
    Thaxter's wife was Mary Gertrude Stoddard (1858-1951).

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Alice Dunlap Gilman

     Pride's Crossing
     Beverly, Massachusetts
     July 31, [1899]

    Dear Cousin Alice:

     I meant to write to you before I came away to tell you how much I enjoyed my dear day with you, and so did Theodore* too. I had been wishing so much to see you, and I always love to take a look at Brunswick, which is always full of delightful associations for me. You made it seem pleasanter than ever with your kind welcome, not only you but all the family, and it was a great delight to see you all again and the old house, and to have a look at the garden.
     We came home easily, getting to Salmon Falls before seven, and found John waiting for us. I was much applauded by Mary* for coming back so much better than I had gone away. Theodore went off again in a few days to make a week's cruise along the shore with one of his friends, and I left just before he got back to come here to make a little visit to my old friend Mrs. Cabot, and today I am going to Mrs. Fields's,* and then home again at the last of the week. Only think, Theodore will be twenty years old on Friday! I can't believe it -- time does fly so fast. He said ever so many times how much he enjoyed his day in Brunswick, especially the good talks with Cousin Charles* (I think it would be hard to tell any difference in their ages!!).
     You can't think how glad I was to see Mrs. Rollins1 again, as she had come home from her long winter away while I was at Mouse Island.2 She looks as well and bright as can be, and it is so pleasant to have her house open again. She was glad to hear about you and Lizzie and Mary.3 Indeed, all of your friends were, and I have told them that I hope you are coming for a nice visit before cold weather. You know there is always a warm welcome waiting for all of you. Good-bye, with love to all, from your affectionate
     Sarah
     I wish so much to know if you got off to Bailey's Island.4 Cousin Fanny will be coming and you musn't put it off too long, for it does you so much good.
 

Notes

    1Ellen Augusta Lord Rollins (1835-1922) lived at Main and Young streets in South Berwick, within sight of Miss Jewett's home.
     2 A wooded, twenty-acre island in Boothbay Harbor, famed in these days for its mineral spring and summer resort hotel, the Samoset House. A decade before this letter was written, Alice Longfellow -- an annual sojourner -- introduced Miss Jewett to the island's charms. Miss Jewett often revisited Miss Longfellow and tried to keep up with her strenuous sessions of rowing and sailing.
     3 Mary Gardiner Gilman (1865-1940), younger sister of Elizabeth, became Town Librarian and occupied the position for forty-seven years. Secretary of the Pejepscot Historical Society, she was an acknowledged authority on the city of Brunswick and Cumberland County.
     4 Bailey Island is just south of Orr's Island in Casco Bay, off the coast of Brunswick.


Editor's Notes

Theodore:  Theodore Eastman, Jewett's nephew.  See Correspondents.

Salmon Falls ... Mary: Salmon Falls, NH, site of a local train station, is across the Piscataqua River from South Berwick.  This Mary is Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Cabot ... Mrs. Fields:  Susan Burley Cabot and Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

Cousin Charles:  Charles Jervis Gilman, born in 1824, actually is 55 years older than Theodore.  See Correspondents.

Cousin Fanny:  Cousin Fanny has not been identified.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by the Sarah Orne Jewett Papers, George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections and Archives, Bowdoin College Library. Additional notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[ Manchester ]

Aug. 2, [1899 ]*

Dear Mary

....... Tomorrow I quite dread, & I suppose it will be hot in town but I must get to H. & M's* & it is apt to be hot in town at this season so one day is as good as another.  I feel very low about my new book of stories (I was over them all morning especially as I took up the Life of Nancy book today & felt how much better those stories were than these, but the Queen's Twin & Where's Nora, just swing the rest, & Martha's Lady which I always liked myself, whatever others may have thought!


Notes

1899:  Jewett speaks of working on her collection The Queen's Twin and Other Stories, which appeared in 1899. The opening ellipses indicate that this is a partial transcription. 

H. & M's:  Houghton, Mifflin & Co., Jewett's publisher.

Life of Nancy ... the Queen's Twin & Where's Nora ... Martha's Lady:  Jewett's collection of 1895 was The Life of Nancy.  The other stories she names were collected in  The Queen's Twin and Other Stories (1899): "The Queen's Twin," "Where's Nora?" and "Martha's Lady." 
    Where Jewett received negative comments on "Martha's Lady" is not yet known.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 70, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. It was hand-copied many years before the current edition, and the old notes are somewhat unclear.  For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to John Thaxter

 

     South Berwick, Maine
     August 7, [1899]

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     I think that this story is far and away better than the others! You have made it stronger in construction, more direct and interesting in every way. I hope that you will not mind my spoiling the two end pages, but somehow they did not quite follow the others well enough and I have shortened them as you will see, and using your own words most always, I have tried to put them into the 'key' of the first chapter. I think the end -- being such an end -- ought to be as clear and simple as possible, and I even want that reference to the second greatest moment in Jonas's experience to come up (when he broke away from his mother), as if in those last moments his life was moved to its very depths. And I want you to write three or four lines of description for the very end -- that "The doctor, as he went out into the clear light of the early morning, along the little sea-pasture, saw a sea pigeon raising itself from the water and diving, then floating; flapping its white-barred wings as if to try its strength."
     I think that this will link the end of the story to its beautiful beginning. There is no need to say anything about the bird, but just say it was there and let people feel what they like about it. Somehow its presence that first morning and the poor fellow, sense of the bird's freedom and yet its fixed habit of life to that spot, were very striking -- and you can't but like the bird and the man, or do better than repeat yourself. I think that this will make the sketch still more definite and complete. I wonder what name you have in mind -- perhaps "The Life of Jonas?" I think that I should try the Atlantic with this, and if that fails, McClure's Magazine or Harper's.1
 
     In great haste,
     Most sincerely,

     S. O. Jewett
 

Notes

See Richard Cary. "Jewett on Writing Short Stories." Colby Library Quarterly 10 (June 1964): 425-440.

     1 In all three extant copies of this story Thaxter followed Miss Jewett's promptings to the letter: equating man and nature transcendentally by way of a structural reprise. Notwithstanding, it sold to none of the sources she suggested.  Sea pigeon is an alternative name for a sea gull.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Louisa Dresel

     South Berwick, Maine
     August 12, [1899?]*

     My dear Loulie:

     Just a word this windy morning to tell you how glad I was to get your letter, and how much I read between the lines that made me happy about you. I am so glad too that I have seen you. I hope that you are keeping out of doors a good deal -- that's the very best thing -- it is impossible not to be one's simple and natural self with nature and I sometimes think that the minute one goes into a house one is subject every way to some degree of artificial conditions! On the whole I approve of them but me must'nt {we mustn't} forget that we are little beasts of the field too!!!

     I was enchanted the other day with a letter in the beginning of Madame Sand's Correspondence (to her friend Madame d'Agoult) where she describes one of her early morning rambles and says that at last she succumbed to the temptation to walk into the river! and then came out again and dried herself in the sun, and liked the effect so much that she repeated it.1

     I tell you about it very stupidly but you will wish to make for the next brook when you read it yourself, and one feels refreshed oneself as one sees how that great woman who was always burdened and excited by her great living and thinking found perfect joy in being a wild creature for a little while, and made herself next of kin to the bushes and the birds. I have been reading her letters and her life lately but it always vexes me to read French books that I care a great deal for because I cannot gallop along the pages as I do with English books. I wish to have your Marianne* read another book of Rudyard Kipling's stories if only for the sake of one called "With the Main Guard." It is in the volume called Soldiers Three.*

     Goodbye dear Loulie for I must get some other letters done in time for the mail. Give my love to your mother.

     Yours lovingly,

     S. O. J.
 

Cary's Notes

     1George Sand, Correspondance 1812-1876 (Paris, 1882), 6 vols: "L'autre jour, j'etais si accablée, que j'entrai dans la rivière tout habilée. Je n'avais pas prévu ce bain, de sorte que je n'avais pas de vétements ad hoc. J'en sortis mouillée de pied en cap" (II, 4-5). Countess Marie de Flavigny d'Agoult is remembered for eloping with Frans Liszt and bearing his child, and as the author of History of the Revolution of 1848 under her pseudonym Daniel Stern.

Mariane: Marianne Brockhaus,* a young German girl Dresel met on one of her frequent trips abroad, who remained a devoted friend and correspondent for many years. When Jewett died, Miss Brockhaus wrote from Dresden to Fields, in part: "I shall always count the hours spent with you both among my most precious recollections & shall never forget the atmosphere of perfect sympathy & understanding in your sweet companionship. The literary world of America lost much but only those who knew her can feel with you, nearer and dearer to this rare woman than anyone else. I am proud to have known her and feel grateful to her for great kindness as well as for opening my eyes to various things in American character that a foreigner never would have appreciated but for her books."  

Editor's Notes

1899 ... Soldiers Three:  Cary gives a date of 1890 for this letter, but Kipling's  Soldiers Three was published in England and the United States in 1899 and contained "With the Main Guard."   Publication history of this book in Wikipedia suggests that Jewett was more likely to have the 1899 edition, though the mentioned story had appeared in an 1888 collection, also called Soldier's Three, published in India.

Marianne Brockhaus:  Marianne Theresia Brockhaus  (22 May 1865 - after 1919) was the daughter of Heinrich Rudolf Brockhaus, who, with his brother Eduard, carried on in the third generation the family publishing firm, F. A. Brockhaus, in Leipzig, Germany.  Marianne Brockhaus corresponded with the German artist Otto Greiner; a collection of his letters to her may be found at the Getty Research Institute.  German architect Frizt Schumaker dedicated Vom Baume der Erkenntnis (1920) to her.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, MS Am 1743 (50).  This transcription by Richard Cary appeared originally in "Jewett to Dresel: 33 Letters," Colby Library Quarterly 7:1 (March 1975), 13-49, which gave permission to reprint it here.  Notes are by Cary, with additions by Terry Heller, Coe College. 



 
SOJ to Horace E. Scudder

     Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass.
     Sunday
     August 20, [1899]
 

     Dear Mr. Scudder:

     Madame Blanc-Bentzon has sent me over from Paris the sheets of this book which she has partly written and wholly edited, and which is being taken up with greatest interest in France.1 She and the publishers are eager that there should be an American edition for use in our schools and I run to you who know so much better than I about such things to ask if you think there would be any chance of the use or success of such a thing. It seems to me very French indeed and not according to our scheme of things, but Mrs. Agassiz2 who has been looking it over thought of it more hopefully than I. I like the chapter on "Friendship"3 especially, as she did, but whether it would appeal to girls -- especially American girls! -- remains doubtful, and while the other chapters give good statements of the virtues somehow they do not make many suggestions or link themselves to the development of modern life. But you will really know whether there is any chance of its use as a textbook or manual in any sense, and I should think your opinion so finally valuable and conclusive that I make bold for a friend's sake to ask you for it. I do not wish to carry it to any publishers if there is really no hope.4
     I am just beginning to feel like myself again after a very long illness and still longer process of getting well. I can speak of every elegant attention of the grippe!! Mrs. Fields asks to be most kindly remembered to you and Mrs. Scudder and Sylvia, and so do I. I hoped to see you more than once last winter, but last winter is to be counted out!
     With kindest regards, believe me always

     Yours sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

     1 Causeries de Morale Pratique (Paris, 1899), written in collaboration with Mlle A. Chevalier, was prepared as a "cours de morale à l'usage des jeunes filles."
    2 Elizabeth Cabot Agassiz (1822-1907), second wife and biographer of the naturalist Jean Louis Agassiz, was a member of Mrs. Fields's social coterie. Her vocational interest centered on Harvard's female "Annex," which she helped to establish as Radcliffe College, and which she served as president until 1899.
    3 The twenty-fourth causerie: "L'amitie.-- Devoirs des aims."
    4 In a letter from Chocorua, New Hampshire, dated August 22, 1899, Scudder confirms Miss Jewett's surmise that translating and publishing the book for use in American schools would be impractical and would, in any case, have no vogue here. (Houghton Library, Harvard.)

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass.
     August 27, 1899

     Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     Mr. Bliss Perry1 (the new editor of the Atlantic) wrote me a day or two [ago] in the course of a letter about other things: "Mr. John Thaxter's story happened to fall into my hands, and I liked his management of the descriptive passages very much. There were other elements too that seemed to me of distinct promise, and I disliked to return the story, though upon the whole I thought it not strongly enough put together to justify publication in the Atlantic."
     I was sorry to find that you had met with a disappointment, but I do think so much frank praise a consolation.
     I have been thinking that you had better send it now to Harper's -- with a personal note to Mr. Henry M. Alden2 in which I am willing that you should tell him of my advice, and I think that since he was such a warm friend of your mother that he would like to know the work was yours, and to see what you are doing; even if he cannot print it, I think he would be glad to help you about it. It is not that I think these things affect the value of work, especially to the mag. in question, which is what the editors must decide by, but all editors like to watch for new writers.
     With kindest wishes, believe me

     Yours sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

See Richard Cary. "Jewett on Writing Short Stories." Colby Library Quarterly 10 (June 1964): 425-440.

     1Bliss Perry (1860-1954), essayist, professor of English literature successively at Princeton and Harvard universities, was editor of the Atlantic Monthly from 1899 to 1909. In their rage for culture, Mrs. Fields and Miss Jewett once tried to convince him that he ought to reprint in the Atlantic twenty-five to thirty pages each month in French from the Revue des Deux Mondes, a suggestion he smilingly rejected.

      2 Henry Mills Alden. See Correspondents.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass.
     [September 1899]

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     Thank you very much for your letter, and especially for the invitation to come to you for a day or two a little later. I keep the pleasantest remembrance of my visit to the farm and I wish that I could see so pleasant a place again but I am almost afraid to make any promise to come this year. I lost so much time through my long illness that I feel very much hurried now that I have had to put by many plans. Perhaps in October or November I may get a day for one of the long drives in which I delight, and so can see you then. I hope that Mrs. Thaxter is having a delightful journey in Canada. Thank you both for wishing that I could come, and believe me

     Yours sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett

     I should like dearly to see our sea pigeon, and the little pasture!*


Notes

little pasture:  See SOJ to John Thaxter August 7, [1899].  Sea pigeon is an alternative name for a sea gull.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.





SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett


Sunday night
[Late summer 1899]*

Dear Mary

            It is a night of loud chirping crickets, and so cool and nice.  I am glad we have come to these cool evenings.  Stubby* and I were very hot coming home, after a delightful luncheon at Mrs. Cabot’s.*  We had a nice drive to the Beverly station and then our troubles began for the cars were crowded and hot and I was dreadfully tired but at Porchmount “Bob Goodwin”* was happily discovered and he and Stubby had such a beautiful time that I felt revived.  They began to talk at once, sage steady talk with frequent brief chuckles, but almost steady, and this lasted until half past twelve at night!  Katy* had a nice supper and after that I held out for a while, but finding that they were going straight through the Harvard book of class pictures with comments appropriate to each!  I departed for bed and had a hot bath and got rested & cool.  Dear things!  they were so happy, and Goodie is a nice boy; one of the best & pleasantest.  I have enjoyed him very much.  Their tongues never ceased and it was a beautiful visit.  Stubby has gone down to York with him.  They had an early breakfast for the 7.42 train and I urged them to drive instead this lovely cool morning so the[y] moved discreetly off with Sarah Fanny.*  Yesterday they had a nice drive and went to Hamilton House but couldn’t find anybody to their exceeding disappo[i]ntment.  I got rested yesterday and had a beautiful day.  It was one of the days when both the house and garden were perfectly lovely.  I went to see Sarah Johnson* late in the afternoon Mrs. B. C.* having reported her as very poorly and I have seldom seen her so well -- all dressed up and sitting in her front room in Sabbath calm!  I fell heir to your Sunday morning interview with Mrs. B. C. and we spoke of Craigin in the course of it, and I said that his sad taking off might be a warning. “Warning!” pronounced Mrs. B. C. with despair.  “There was Horace Bennett took up in bushel baskets and what good did that ever do to Izik!”  We ought to remember this as an example of the futility of human things.  I went on to see Becca and found her nicely and going to walk out with Ida Raynes,* & she came in here later in the evening.  Joe seems to be all right and all the household.  I could go on writing all the morning there seem to be so many interesting things to say, but I must get the last of my book things off by the morning mail & go to the Bank & do some sewing and speak with Joe about some things in the garden with high pomp -- in your absence.  Give my love to everybody.  It seems as if I hadn’t heard for a great while as I lost your Saturday letter to Manchester.  We are going by Dover & Lakeport tomorrow -- a “new road”.  -- The address is Holmewood, Holderness, N. H. Care Miss Longfellow* (Aunt Mary I am pleased to be going!)*

                                                                                    With best love

                                                                                        Sarah

Topsy is very well & rose the hill yesterday.*  Helen Sewall sailed on the fifteenth Becca said.

 


Notes

1899: Almost certainly this letter was composed between the end of Theodore Jewett Eastman's first year at Harvard and his graduation year of 1901. That Joe is mentioned as possibly in the Jewett employ in 1899 provides justification for tentatively placing this letter with others of 1899.

Stubby:  Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Cabot:  Susan Burley Cabot. Referred to later in the letter as Mrs. B. C.  See Correspondents.

Porchmount “Bob Goodwin”:  "Porchmount" is a local pronunciation for "Portsmouth (NH)," which Jewett occasionally uses in her letters. In Theodore Jewett Eastman's Harvard University class of 1901 was Robert Eliot Goodwin of Concord, MA, who eventually completed a law degree and set up practice in Boston.

Katy:  Katy Galvin. See Correspondents.

Sarah Fanny: This seems to be a Jewett family horse, with perhaps a play on the name Sarafina.  Assistance is welcome.

Hamilton House:  The 18th-century house built by Jonathan Hamilton in South Berwick.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents.

Sarah Johnson:  This neighbor of Mrs. Cabot has not yet been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Craigin ... his taking off ,.. Horace Bennett took up in bushel baskets ... Izik!:  Mrs. Cabot and Jewett seem to be discussing the unfortunate deaths of Isaac Craigin and Horace Benntt.  Neither of these men has been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Becca ... Ida Raynes:  For Rebecca Young, see Correspondents. The identity of Ida Raynes is not yet known.  The one person of this name appearing in on-line records lived 1848-1896 in South Berwick and married William Waterman Palfrey in 1869, changing her name long before Theodore Eastman Jewett was born.

Joe: In a letter of Saturday  [June 17 or 24, 1899] to Annie Adams Fields, Jewett mentions Joe, the gardener, and his "old" Mary.  There it appears they may be employees of Emily Tyson.

Miss Longfellow: Alice Mary Longfellow.  See Correspondents.

(Aunt Mary I am pleased to be going!): Though the transcription does not confirm it, this parenthetical message seems likely to have been added by Theodore.

Topsy:  Topsy appears to be a horse, but the animal or person seems not to have been mentioned in other Jewett letters.  Assistance is welcome.

Helen Sewall:  Probably this is a South Berwick neighbor, Helen D. Sewall (1845-1922), who was sister to Jotham and Jane Sewall.  See Pirsig, The Placenames of South Berwick, p. 75.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

[In top left corner of page 1; 2 lines]
I am so sorry about William*
Do tell me if he is better

            Monday Morning [25 September 1899]*

Dearest Annie

            I meant to write you a good long letter yesterday but I went to church in the morning and after early dinner I [fell corrected] to reading and then I went to see Miss Huntress* -- and the day was gone.  I never had such pleasure before in reading Mr. Arnold's letters which Mary had lying about.  I see him much more plainly now than I ever had before[.]  his boundaries come out very clear, his usefulness and sincerity, his power of doing what he wished, his

[ Page 2 ]

kindness in every day life, but a lack of greatness.  The scholar the teacher, but nothing of what one always meets face to face at every moment in Tennyson, a  kind of loftiness of feeling[: ?] the opposite of what for lack of a better word we call commonplaceness. 

    Do you remember how often and how anxiously M. A. denies 'greatness' to Tennyson? ---- It is very interesting to read the letters again[.]  I think it was a lack in him not in the book, which I felt

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at first so strongly.

    The letter of [Triene ?]* is [pinted meaning pointed?] enough so that possibility must be put by.  They can only help themselves, and we must leave them alone.  I dare say their going might wear upon Eva[; ?] * At any rate we can do no more.  And I dare say we shall have one comfort that they may perk up in [unrecognized name], I mean, out of a desire to show that there was no need of their going.  I am writing while I wait for the mail to come. Perhaps I ^shall^ get

[ Page 4 ]

a letter from you! -- This is a very eventful week.  Katy going to Boston for two days to get her winter things & see her mother, and Stubby* to depart with all his goods on Wednesday and that afternoon I shall take Mary & we are going to drive up to Tamworth* for a day or two.  We shall take a night on the road both ways and get back on Saturday.  I hope that it wont rain.  I get a good deal out of these drives in what I see and have to think about.  This visit has been put off one year after another for a long time, but now we both see

[w circled in another hand, bottom left corner of page 4.]

[ Page 5 ]

our way to going.  I hope you will think it is nice.  It is gray weather today but not cold:  however it may be any sort of weather before Wednesday and if it looks stormy then, why, of course, we shall not go --

    The Merrimans came in on the New England.  I hope to have a word from "Old Helen[.]"

    What a nice note from Boylston Adams* -- it will be so good about the room.  And on very cold days, which after all do not come so often or stay so very long, he can find some warmer place with his books, elsewhere in the house.  I believe you will like having them there even more than you think -- it will be so much more advantage to him than if he were in a lodging house and they will feel better about him beside.  It will give him a little more hold on the world he belongs to, and he will be too busy with his studies to make you feel any weight of his presence.  We must both do everything we can for him.  I think it is a place where what one can do will really count.

    But I must stop writing.  Good bye dear with no end of love.

        Pinny*



Notes

25 September 1899:  This date is inferred from the fact that Jewett's nephew, Theodore Eastman, leaves home during this week to return to Harvard.  In 1899, Harvard opened for the fall term during the week of 25 September.
    The other event that helps to date this letter so precisely is mentioned in SOJ to Annie Adams Fields  Friday night [ 29 September 1899 ], the death of John Hamilton Rice on 25 September 1899.

William:  SOJ to Annie Adams Fields, Sunday. [around July 4, 1899], indicates that William, probably a Fields employee, is suffering from tonsillitis.  That at the end of September, he still has health problems related to that illness seems unlikely, so it would appear he has suffered another misfortune.

Miss Huntress:  William Huntress was a cabinet maker and prominent businessman in late 19th-century South Berwick, ME.  A talk on Jewett by Rebecca O. Young is reported in the Lewiston Evening Journal (23 November 1918, p. 7).  Young says that Jewett's two teachers at Olive Raynes' school were Miss Raynes and Miss Huntress.  It may be that neither of these clues points toward the Miss Huntress whom Jewett visited.  Assistance is welcome.

Arnold ... letters... Mary:  Jewett probably is reading Letters of Matthew Arnold 1848-1888,  edited by George William Erskine Russell (Macmillan 1895-6).
    Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

TennysonAlfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (1809 - 1892) "was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets."

The letter of [Triene ?]:  What Jewett speaks of here is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Eva:   This may be Baroness Eva von Blomberg.  See Correspondents.

Katy ... Stubby:  Katy Galvin is a Jewett family employee, and Stubby is Theodore Jewett Eastman, Jewett's nephew.  See Correspondents.

Tamworth
Tamworth, NH is in the White Mountains.  It includes the villages of Chocorua, South Tamworth, Wonalancet, and Whittier.

Merrimans ...the New England ... "Old Helen"..., Boylston Adams:  Helen Bigelow Merriman.  See Correspondents.
    The S.S. New England, of the Dominion Line, served the Liverpool to Boston route in 1899.
    Richard Cary identifies "Old Helen" as Helen Bigelow Merriman.
    Boyston Adams is almost certainly Zabdiel Boylston Adams, III, (1875-1940) son of Annie Adams Fields's brother Zabdiel Boylston Adams, Jr. (1829-1902).  The younger Boylston became a surgeon.

Pinny: one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

[Written on lined paper, across the lines]

            Wednesday night [27 September 1899]*
                Wakefield, N.H.

Dearest Annie

    I send you just a word to say that we had a most lovely long afternoon drive; the hills begin to stand high and the colours are most beautiful very green trees & very bright trees mixed together[.]  We came twenty-five miles, and are going to spend the night in this nice old fashioned Pike's

[ Page 2 ]

Tavern -- at Union Village.*  It was a little windy when we first set forth but the wind went down and it grew beautifully still & clear.  I have n't much to say but to send my love --  It seems like a journey you would love, but perhaps almost too long drives -- Tomorrow 30 miles, but the air is oh

[ Page 3 ]

so good.  Mary* seems to be already enjoying much, and I long to see the little old houses and to make up stories about the people.  Good night dear with ever & ever so much love

        P. L.


Notes

27 September 1899:  This letter is dated in relation to the letters below from Jewett to Annie Fields during her trip with her sister, Mary, to the area of Tamworth, NH.

Wakefield, N.H.
Wakefield is a town in Carroll County, New Hampshire, just across the Maine border, about 30 miles north by road from South Berwick, ME.  On the following day, Jewett and her sister plan to drive to Tamworth, NH, another 30 miles north northeast.

Pike's Tavern ... Union Village:  Dudley Pike's Hotel / Tavern in Union Village, NH, would have been about 5 miles south of the village of Wakefield.  Though this is not certain, the Pike Tavern may still stand in the area.  The problem is that Dave Proctor's house, which is supposed once to have been Pike's Tavern is located not in Union Village, but in nearby Brookfield.  Assistance is welcome in resolving this confusion.

Mary:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.

P.L.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields
[28 September 1899]*
        Wonalancet  Thursday
        Tamworth, NH


Dearest Annie

    I have got your dear letter & the other envelope with Mr. Emerson's* note and delightful little sketch which everybody is ready to steal away from me.  I do hope that I shall see them[,]  Mr. E. & Sylvia* but I dont see how I can get to Manchester until early in the week.  I shall not get home until some time on Sunday, and we only have tomorrow & tonight here leaving early on Saturday morning[.]

[ Page 2 ]

    -- We have had a long drive today, all day in fact except a couple hours at Ossipee* at noon.  It has been a perfect day, such colour & neither too warm [nor corrected] too cold.  Mrs. Walden ('Grace') who wishes to be kindly remembered to you -- has really made a most charming summer home here -- 105 acres and an old house charmingly [unrecognized word][.]  I am so glad to see it after all these years -- & we have

[ Page 3 ]

so many old times to talk over -- Mary* having such a nice time that is good to see -- Darling Fuff.*  I shall try to get to you on Monday but perhaps it will have to be a little later.  I send you dearest love, and I shall try to write a letter later tomorrow.  This goes on the dead run for the early mail. 

    Love to Sylvia & R. W. E.

    from P. L.



Notes

28 September 1899:  This date is inferred from facts that appear in other letters related to the short trip to the Tamworth, NH, undertaken by Jewett and her sister at the end of September 1899.  Jewett's nephew, Theodore Eastman, leaves home during this week to return to Harvard.  In 1899, Harvard opened for the fall term during the week of 25 September.  In SOJ to Annie Adams Fields  Friday night [ 29 September 1899 ], she mentions the death of John Hamilton Rice on 25 September 1899.

Wonalancet ... Tamworth, NH:  "Wonalancet is an unincorporated community in the northwestern corner of the town of Tamworth in Carroll County, New Hampshire, United States." Wikipedia

Mr. Emerson's note ... Mr. E. & Sylvia:  This is somewhat puzzling because at the end of the letter, Jewett refers to "R. W. E. and Sylvia."  However, it seems quite likely that she refers to the American architect William Ralph Emerson (1833 - 1917).  Wikipedia says that Emerson was a cousin of Ralph Waldo Emerson; born in Alton, IL, he lived most of his life in Boston: "On September 15, 1873 he married Sylvia Hathaway Watson."  Watson (1833-1917) was his second wife.

Ossipee
:  Ossipee Lake also is in Carroll County, NH.  Wikipedia

Mrs. Walden ('Grace'):   Katherine (Kate) Sleeper Walden (1862 - 1949) established the Wonalancet Farm Inn in about 1891.  In 1902, she married Arthur Treadwell Walden (1871-1947), "a Klondike Gold Rush adventurer, dog driver and participant in the first Byrd Antarctic Expedition. He is also known as an author and developer of the Chinook sled dog breed."  Wikipedia
    For a biographical sketch of Mrs. Walden, see When Women and Mountains Meet: Adventures in the White Mountains by Julie Boardman, pp. 82-7.
    While the couple did not marry until 1902, it appears that they were cohabiting well before this date and that she may have been called "Mrs. Walden" in 1899.
    No explanation or confirmation of her being called "Grace" has yet been found.  Assistance is welcome.

Mary ... Fuff:  Mary Rice Jewett.  See Correspondents.
    Fuff is Jewett's nickname for Annie Fields.

P.L.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

                Friday night [ 29 September 1899 ]*

Dearest Annie

    It has been a lovely day.  I have enjoyed my little visit here very much.  We are going to start after breakfast tomorrow to drive home again.  Thirty-six miles tomorrow, and I hope it it is n't going to rain but it is cloudy over the mountains.  You would love the sight of

[ Page 2]

Sandwich Dome and Passaconaway & Chocura* -- and there is  just enough colour to be most beautiful.

    I think of your dear guests tonight.  I hope you will give my love to them.  If you really cant give away those scissors (!) there is a pretty French box in the same

[ Page 3]

drawer with a bit of brocade & galore (Dear Jess!)* and [you corrected] may carry that to Alice* instead.  You may think she would like it better.  I am not sure that she wouldn't myself .. I got it for a present ... so do what you think best.  Give my love to Judy* wont you?  I made

[ Page 4]

a truly unfortunate choice of my week away, but the weather has been good; if I had stayed away & it had rained too it would have been far more unsatisfactory.  But oh darling Fuff* rest yourself all you can and get some of your port wine & take [littles ?] of it.  I think you seem as if you would be better for it.  There is a great talk going on about a little

[16 circled at bottom left of page 3]

[ Page 4]

new bird, who could be hunted up by colour or house or size on anything in the bird book.  He has been on the piazza today in the vines.  I shall tell you all sorts of things when we meet. ^I hope to get home on Sunday noon and [remainder of the insertion written in the right and top margins] if it doesn't rain tomorrow & hinder our starting,^ I shall hope to see you very soon dearest Fuff* but I think I may be almost

[ Page 5]

too tired to come right away on Monday.  The two days drive is pretty steep! in every sense.

    = I got a letter today from poor Cora* in answer to mine.  Such a characteristic letter, full of expressions!  She might have written it next week -- or anytime, poor thing!  I cant tell what a strange feeling

[ Page 6]

it gave me -- But I shall try to do what I can -- I wish that I could think it would be much, but she has her boys lives to live in now. --------

    I must not write on.  I send you much love, and I think of you anxiously[.]  I am so afraid you are getting tireder than you ought and I want to build you up a little stronger

[ Page 7]

When I come.  Take a little quinine* for two or three days, & then stop?

                Yours always
                    P.L.


Notes

29 September 1899:  This date is inferred from the reference to "poor Cora," whose husband died and left her with 3 sons, aged 18-20, at the end of September 1899.  See note below.

Sandwich Dome and Passaconaway & ChocuraSandwich Mountain (or Dome) is in the Sandwich range of the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  The range also includes Mount Passaconaway, named after a Pennacook Indian chief, and Mount Chocorua.

Jess ...  Alice ... Judy:  While this is not certain, it likely Jewett refers to Jessie Cochrane and Alice Greenwood (Mrs. George Dudley) Howe. See Correspondents
    While this has not been confirmed, it seems likely that Judy is Judith Drew Beal, stepdaughter of Annie Fields's sister, Louisa Adams Beal.  See Annie Fields in Correspondents.

Fuff:  One of Annie Fields' nicknames.

Cora:  Richard Cary says: "Cora Clark Rice (1849-1925) was one of Miss Jewett's earliest Boston friends who introduced her to the social and cul­tural life of the city. Married to the son of a Massachusetts governor, John Rice, she devoted much time to philanthro­pies and the Home for Incurables in Bos­ton.
    John Hamilton Rice (July 6, 1849 - September 25, 1899) was the son of Alexander Hamilton Rice, former governor of Massachusetts, and Augusta E. McKim.
    Cora and John's children were:  Alexander Hamilton Rice, Jr. (1875-1956); John Clark Rice (1876- ); and Arthur Noble Rice (1878- )

quinineQuinine is a medication used to prevent and treat malaria.

P.L.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Louisa Loring Dresel

Wednesday Morn -- [Before 14 October, 1899]1

South Berwick.

Maine.

My dear Loulie

When I was in the train yesterday I said to me "Loulie will be landing one of these days and you must send a not[e] to meet her!" and what should I find but a note from you -- all landed and settled down at housekeeping in the cottage!2  I shall hope to see you very soon dear and I am so glad that you are safe at home. and that your cousin is here --

We are just going to town[.] Mrs. Fields* has gone herself today but comes back to sleep and the general flitting takes place tomorrow. I shall stay in town over the Dewey celebration which you and your cousin ought to see -- 3 and then go to Berwick on Monday -- but I shall hope to have Mrs. Fields there for a while,  it is far too early for her to settle down in town.  I am feeling much better in this last month and the ailment of the months before are fast being forgotten -- No more grippe for me, if you please: but I was foolish in not heeding the Doctor who always warned me that it would be a long time before I really got well.

How glad the Aunties must be to see you and to have you back! I wish I could see you myself!

Yours affectionately, S. O. J.


Notes

1 This has been dated by the Colby curators "10-99."

2The family cottage was at Cove Hill in Beverly, Massachusetts. Dresel spent many of her summers there, a few miles from the Fields' cottage at Manchester.

314 October 1899 was declared a state holiday by Governor Roger Wolcott to celebrate the arrival of Admiral George Dewey to Boston, Dewey was seen as a national hero and presidential hopeful for his victory at Manila Bay, which won the Spanish-American War. The parade route passed the Fields' residence at 148 Charles Street.

Editor's Notes

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott  Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.



 
SOJ to Sarah Cabot Wheelwright

 South Berwick Monday Eve
[Autumn 1899 or later]*

My dear Sarah

I am so sorry that I was prevented from writing to you today -- I wish to tell you as soon as possible about the trains to South Berwick on next Saturday afternoon. If you are going to join Mary Wheelwright at Beverly* (or she can join you, to be more exact!) you had better take the 3:30 train Eastern Division track 4 at the North Station. Go along the line of cars until you come to one marked for Northern Div. (ask the brakeman)-- & for South Berwick, Sommersworth Rochester etc, then you won't have to change cars any where, and we shall meet you at the South Berwick Station. Tell Mary that she will find this car toward the rear of the train at Beverly at 4:05. I underline Eastern Division Track 4. because sometimes people make a mistake and take a Western Div. -- 3:30 train which is wrong=goes [so transcribed] to another part of the town. I do hope that you can both come.  I send this slip of paper about trains for you to send to Mary. Mrs. Fields and I got down very well on Saturday but pretty tired after the difficult little campaign in town. It is lovely soft weather  -- but not like the Newport climate as Miss Appleton2 describes it -- with roses still in bloom. She speaks with such pleasure of seeing you and having a visit from A. C. W. (How I wish I could have one!)3 Mrs. Fields sends you her love and my sister sends her love and welcome to you both. You may like to say that the first of the week will suit you better than Saturday but oh do come if you can dear! I am pretty sure of the Tysons being here until the 1st or after and I know that Elsie [Elise?] & Mary4 wanted would [wanted should be deleted? ] play together out of doors beautifully,

Good night with ever so much love and I do hope that you will feel stronger and that the little change of coming north a little way to a new little old house like this will do you good.

Yours always
Sarah


Notes

1Mary and Sarah Jewett totally refurbished their South Berwick home between 1887 and 1890; the date of this invitation possibly falls toward the end of this period.

2 Mary Worthen Appleton (12 May 1886 - 15 April 1965), Newport, RI, supported local arts and philanthropy.  For example, she and Helen Ellis (died c. 15 November 1940) served on the board of the Newport Hospital around 1910 and were members of the Newport Historical Society.
    According to Appleton's Annual Cyclopedia and Register of Important Events for 1899 (pp. 574-6), Appleton was the daughter of William Henry Appleton (1814-1899) who, with his father, founded the New York publishing firm, D. Appleton & Co.  However, an Appleton genealogy web site lists Mary as the daughter of his son, William Worthen Appleton, which better fits her life dates.

3Andrew Cunningham Wheelwright, Sarah Cabot's husband.

4Elise (Elizabeth) Tyson Vaughan (1871 - 1949) , stepdaughter of Emily Tyson; see Correspondents


Editor's Notes

Autumn 1899:  Stoddart dates this letter in 1890, but almost certainly it was composed after 1898, when the Tysons purchased Hamilton House.  By 1899, they had taken up seasonal residence in the house.   That the season is autumn seems implied in the report of late-blooming roses.  See SOJ to Annie Adams Fields [June 1899].

Mary Wheelwright at Beverly
:  Daughter of Mrs. Wheelwright; see Correspondents.  Beverly is just west of Manchester by the Sea in northeastern Massachusetts.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott  Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Henry Green

     Boston
     October 18, [1899]

    Dear Elder Henry:

     Can you send me -- at South Berwick -- ten dollars worth of small fancy articles; pin cushions and little work-cases and a selection of your 'pretty things?' I should like to have them there on Monday next to send to a Fair. I shall not return any, and I shall be responsible for this amount, or I can give the rest elsewhere if any remain unsold. Please do not send anything that will cost much above a dollar.
     It begins to seem a long time since I have seen you or my friends at Alfred. I was glad to hear about you through Eldress Aurelia Mace* whom I was glad to 'make friends with' last year at Poland Spring. I have not been there this year as I half expected, but I am glad to say that I am much better than when I saw you last; and fast getting better still, though I am not yet well.
     Please give my kind love to Eldress Lucinda and all the younger sisters who remember my visit to your family -- as I do very often. I hope that another year I can go to Alfred again.

     Believe me always
     Yours most sincerely,
     Sarah O. Jewett


Notes

Eldress Aurelia MaceAurelia Gay Mace (1835-1910) lived among the Shakers most of her life.  The Sabbathday Lake Shaker village was just a few miles from Poland Spring, ME, about 14 miles south of Lewiston.

Alfred ... Eldress LucindaThe Alfred, ME., Shaker photograph collection, ca. 1850-ca. 1940. includes photos of Elder Henry Green, Eldress Fanny Casey, and Eldress Lucinda Taylor.  Further information about these people is welcome.
    The Shaker community at Alfred, ME was established 1783-93.  Wikipedia

This letter is transcribed by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     South Berwick, Maine
     October 23, 1899

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     Thank you for your very kind letter, but I am afraid that I must not promise to accept your invitation. I am very busy these weeks with writing and guests and hurrying off to Town for two or three days at a time. I am well again after so long a pull of illness, but not very strong, and I must put many pleasant things aside.
     I am sorry that your story is not yet placed. I asked Mr. Arthur Stedman1 if he would not undertake the placing of your work and he probably will write to you. A great many writers do all that by means of such an agent now. You have to pay a commission, but they generally get very good prices. He is at the Dewey Building, 5 East 14th Street, New York.
     With my best regards to Mrs. Thaxter.
     Yours most sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett

     P. S.
     I have felt disappointed that Mr. Alden2 should not have known about this last story. I think that he was on his vacation when it was sent. Why do not you write him a letter and ask if you may send it again and tell him that it was sent back to you, but that I thought he would like to see it, and would at any rate give you a word of advice. He was a very warm friend of your mother and certain things in the story would interest him doubly, as they did me.
     Try some short sketches of 1500 or 2000 words with a view of the Youth's Companion. And if you get on with them, send them to the Care of Johnson Morton, Esq., Office of the Youth's Companion, Boston. I should think you could make easily some good sketches of fishing or woodcraft or of shooting, if you shoot. They are always longing for such things!! Short!!


Notes

See Richard Cary. "Jewett on Writing Short Stories." Colby Library Quarterly 10 (June 1964): 425-440.

     1 Arthur Griffin Stedman (1859-1908), son of Edmund Clarence Stedman, maintained a literary agency in addition to his own literary work. He prepared the biographies for A Library of American Literature, which was jointly edited by his father and Ellen M. Hutchinson in 1892; compiled a volume of selected poems by Whitman; brought out an edition of Melville's Typee; and supervised a series called Fiction, Fact, and Fancy.

    2  Henry Mills Alden. See Correspondents.

    3  Johnson Morton (1865-1922) was editor of The Youth's Companion (1893-1907).

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine. Additional material by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     148 Charles Street
     Boston
     November 1, [1899]

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     I thank you for your kind and delightful letter. We are all three glad to know that you found some pleasure in your little visit because it gave us such real pleasure to see you!
     Indeed I think that your idea of changing Jonas's 'plain name' to "The Sea Pigeon"* is excellent!
     I happened to see Mr. Johnson Morton* last evening, and I had a good chance to tell him how much interested I am in your work, and he said that he should be glad to talk with you. You must keep in mind the fact that the Y[outh's] C[ompanion] is primarily for 'Youth' not children, but sketches of adventure are always in order. I do not see why he could not use "Blown Off."

     In haste,
     Yours most sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

See Richard Cary. "Jewett on Writing Short Stories." Colby Library Quarterly 10 (June 1964): 425-440.

The Sea Pigeon:  See SOJ to John Thaxter August 7, [1899].  Sea pigeon is an alternative name for a sea gull.

Morton:  Johnson Morton (1865-1922) was editor of The Youth's Companion (1893-1907).

This letter is transcribed by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.


 
Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

 

 November 3, 1899.

     I had the first real day in the studio to-day since June 10th, and now hope to be able to do Some Work. But one never knows, and then what you do do, never seems to be just it, but only just before it. All of which is part of the Philosophy.


Notes

the studio:  In A Studio of Her Own (MFA: Boston, 2001), Erica E. Hirshler says that after 1892, Whitman maintained the Lily Glass Works at 184 Boyston St., near Park Square, about half a mile from the Fields house at 148 Charles St. (p. 39).

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.




SOJ to Silvanus Hayward

4 November 1899
South Berwick, Maine

Dear Mr. Hayward

I am sorry to be so late in thanking you for sending me the copies of your poem and the sermon on Prost.1 They both interest me very much -- the poem must have given great pleasure to those who heard it read on that delightful Old Home Day.* -- As I read your sermon, I remembered what an old friend said to me when I was a girl: 'Learn to rest in your work instead of resting from it'2 -- which has always been a great help to me. You have by no means lost the descriptive power which I used to admire so much when I listened to your sermons here long ago. It gave me quite a pang when you said that man had taken no steps toward the removal of sin for I can't believe that the real goodness of life & thought have had no effect (good sermons for instance!) The world seems to me much better than when I was a child, but perhaps you would say more comfortable & better behaved, not really better?

But we must talk about these great things some day. that will be much better than trying to write, please give my most affectionate messages to Lucy and Bell* and believe me with many thanks for your kind remembrance

Yours sincerely

Sarah O. Jewett


Stoddart's Notes

1The intended word may be "Protestant."  However, it is possible the Jewett wrote "Rest," which, according to Worldcat, was the title of a sermon Hayward delivered "in the Congregational church, Lyndon, September 6, 1899."  The location of Lyndon is uncertain, there being a Lyndon in Vermont, while in Maine there are East and North Lyndon.  However, there is a Congregational church in Lyndonville, VT, less than a mile from Lyndon.

2 This quotation turns up, in The Lutheran Companion 25 (1917) p. 128, in an inspirational piece on work by Frank Nelson of Minneapolis, MN.  He writes: "Learn to rest in your work, as well as from it!"  Clearly, Jewett could not be quoting him, but this evidence suggests that perhaps they had a common source, or perhaps this was a fairly common saying.


Editor's Notes

Old Home Day:  Hayward's home town, Gilsum, NH, held an Old Home Day on August 29, 1899.  According to an account in Reports to the Legislature of the State of New Hampshire, Volume 2, p. 216, Hayward presented an oration at this event, "The Influence of Home."  While biographical sketches indicate that he also wrote poems, it is not yet known whether he presented any of his own poetry as part of his oration.

Lucy and Bell:  Mrs. Lucy Keays Hayward, second wife of Silvanus; Bell Hayward, the oldest daughter of Silvanus was Lucy's step-daughter.  See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is in the collection of the Miller Library of Colby College, Waterville, ME.  The transcription first appeared in Scott  Stoddart's Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign: Selected Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett, copyright by Stoddart, 1988.  Annotation is by Stoddart, supplemented where appropriate by Terry Heller, Coe College.




Sarah Orne Jewett to James Jeffrey Roche

[Letterhead] South Berwick, Maine [End letterhead]  8 Novr 1899


My dear Sir

    I have decided to keep both the books -- (the clumsy volume of Madame de Sévigné's Letters* for the sake of two of the portraits!)  But I should 'still' like to hear of an old French edition.  The Daniel* I am very glad to get, and you need not look further, only please let me hear if a copy of one

[ Page 2 ]

of the early editions of the Poems comes your way, or the Poems of John Donne.*

Believe me with thanks
Yours sincerely
S. O. Jewett


Notes


Sévigné's Letters: Marie de Rabutin-Chantal, marquise de Sévigné (1626 - 17 April 1696) "was a French aristocrat, remembered for her letter-writing. Most of her letters, celebrated for their wit and vividness, were addressed to her daughter."

DanielSamuel Daniel (1562-1619) was an English poet and historian.

John Donne:  John Donne (1572-1631) was an English metaphysical poet and became a cleric in the Church of England.

The manuscript of the letter is held by the Burns Library, Boston College.  Citation: Sarah Orne Jewett letter, 1899 November 8, box 7, folder 32, Authors Collection, MS.1986.087, John J. Burns Library, Boston College.  Transcription and annotation by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to John Thaxter

     Boston
     [November-December 1899]

    Dear Mr. Thaxter:

     Your letter and the sketch have followed me here, or you should have heard sooner.
     I don't care for this little story as much as for some others -- it reads as if you had rather pushed yourself to the writing of it, and with all its wonderful accuracy of detail, and perfect verity of the old man's speech, it has an artificial quality in its makeup that your best things lack. I think that the melodramatic quality does not go with the material. The old man is so real; the shut up room for so many years does not seem to me to go with his plain living. There might be such a room with the untouched things, but --
     I must not try to write just what I mean. The shipwreck, the drowning; it isn't simple enough, there is too much in it. And then the Doctor who is so familiar with this case of rheumatism -- how is it that he sees the room and above all hears the story for the first time!
     I wish you would try some country talk on a more everyday basis:1 a horse trade reported, a funny bargaining sort of talk; a good story told as some old farmers sit together -- one might overtake the other plodding toward the village (have a bit of landscape) and take him in and hear that he has been cheated in a horse trade or a wagon bought at auction that comes to pieces, and his wife has jeered at him. Call the sketch "A Bad Morning," or something of that sort. All your sense of this talk ought to make something very good. But I must not write longer.
     Yours most truly,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

See Richard Cary. "Jewett on Writing Short Stories." Colby Library Quarterly 10 (June 1964): 425-440.

    1Thaxter had sent Miss Jewett a story written almost entirely in rustic dialogue, replete with the misspellings dear to unrestrained local colorists. She was looking for the kind of languid localisms she used herself, and which would have given the story unequivocal native resonance.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



SOJ to Horace E. Scudder

     148 Charles Street
     Boston
     December 12, [1899]

    Dear Mr. Scudder:

     I did not have time to answer your letter in some hurried days at home, but this has given me more time to think the matter of it over, and I am now pretty sure that it would not be wise, poor me, to undertake such a piece of work. I can see that it would be very interesting, but I am full of plans already which I long to be able to carry through, and I have a great reluctance before the thought of turning aside into a new road.1
     When I come to Town to stay for some time (this being but a brief stay), I shall hope to see you.
     I am sending you a copy of The Queen's Twin2 by this same post with many unwritten messages of affectionate remembrance. It begins to seem a great while since you printed "The Shipwrecked Buttons" and "The Girl With the Cannon Dresses" in the Riverside Magazine3 -- in fact, I can't remember when I have thought of their dear young names before!

     Yours most sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett


Notes

     1 Scudder must have prompted her to act on Charles Dudley Warner's suggestion* that she write an heroic novel about John Paul Jones's activities in Maine (see Letter 122). Warner admonished her to "Hold the story always in solution in your mind ready to be precipitated when your strength permits. That is to say, even if your fires are banked up, keep the story fused in your mind." (Mrs. James T. Fields, Charles Dudley Warner [New York, 1904], 183-184.) As an editor, he was aware that the vogue of local color was on the wane and that the historical romance was capturing the attention of the American reading public.
     2The Queen's Twin and Other Stories, containing one new and seven collected sketches, with cover design by Sarah Wyman Whitman, was published by Houghton, Mifflin & Company in 1899.
     3 January and August 1870, respectively.

Editor's notes

Warner's suggestion:  While it is plausible that Scudder has encouraged Jewett to undertake The Tory Lover, it seems odd that Jewett would demur, given that she did, in fact, begin the novel within months of this letter and, apparently, had been considering the project for several years.  Perhaps Jewett's mentioning her early children's stories offers a clue to an alternative, that Scudder proposed a new collection of her children's fiction to follow on her success with the Betty Leicester stories, particularly Betty Leicester's Christmas (1899).  "The Girl With the Cannon Dresses" (1870), for example, had never been collected.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Additional notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

[Tuesday morning]
[ December 1899 ]

 

A.F.* sends love and so do I, to you both.  The girls were so pleased with our presents, and Maggie* made such a pretty tark about Stubby’s* kind remembrance of a purse.  “He was always thinking. he do be arlways just like that!”  So no more at present from

                                                                                                Sarah


Notes

1899:  This speculative date rests solely upon the fact that Jewett mentions Maggie, presumably a Fields employee, in another letter from this year. Transcriber's notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Tuesday Morning].

A.F.: Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

Maggie: Presumably an Irish employee of Annie Fields.  "Tark," for example is Jewett's rendition of Maggie's pronunciation of "talk."

Stubby: Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




 

SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Sunday morning

[ Dec. 1899 ]*


...... You may be interested to know that the old Roman emperor is no more & I have married William to the shepherdess & Mrs. Todd & I have seen them off to Green Island in the boat.*

Notes

1899: This date was added by the transcriber, and it seems a reasonable guess, because it is near to the time of Jewett's composition of "A Dunnet Shepherdess." The opening ellipses indicate that this is a partial transcription.

boat:  Jewett is discussing the composition of "William's Wedding" (1910), a story she did not publish in her lifetime.  Her story, "A Dunnet Shepherdess" (Atlantic Monthly, December 1899, introduces Thankful Hight, mother of Esther, who becomes William Blackett's bride in "William's Wedding."  When the narrator meets Thankful, she sees: "In a large chair facing the window there sat a masterful-looking old woman with the features of a warlike Roman emperor, emphasized by a bonnet-like black cap with a band of green ribbon. Her sceptre was a palmleaf fan."

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 70, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. It was hand-copied many years before the current edition, and the old notes are somewhat unclear.  For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Edited by Terry Heller, Coe College.



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