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1899    1901

Sarah Orne Jewett Letters of 1900




Annie Adams Fields to Mary Rice Jewett

[7 January 1900 in another hand ]*

Saturday afternoon

Dear Mary:

    A beautiful little kitty has just arrived -- quite wild at the new place and surroundings, but she is a welcome visitor and we thank you most particularly.

    Sarah* has gone to the play and I am entertaining a few scattering ladies who drop in from time to time.

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Here, being interrupted I will simply add that soon after Sarah's return you must come again for a few days, before and after the New York expedition.

Affectionately
yours

Annie Fields


Notes

7 January 1900:  The rationale for this date is not known.  It may have been added in Mary Jewett's hand.

Sarah: Sarah Orne Jewett. See Correspondents.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in Letters from Annie Fields to Mary Rice Jewett, Jewett Family Papers: MS014.01.04.  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller. Coe College.



27

Annie Adams Fields to Mary Rice Jewett

Jan. 7th 1900

Dear Mary:

    I am sending you one of six lots of papers sent to me by Mme Blanc.*

    It is quite possible that your aunt* will like to turn them over to the schools or charities of Portland who will be glad to send reports on their advanced [ work perhaps ? ] to Paris.  Th.B's* address you have.

    Please give my affectionate

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remembrance to your aunt and best wishes for this New Year.  I like to think you are with her.  Do enjoy this delicious weather in her company.

    I am very well if I take care! and Sarah* also.  She has enjoyed her week with dear Mrs. Cabot,* who is giving away her personal possessions to her nearest friends as if she felt the

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low door out of this world very near.  It is not that altogether however.  She love to give and it is a habit of her life.  I quite sympathize with her feeling of liking to give away all her possessions which she need not use.  It is so much pleasanter than leaving them to be handled by others, we know not by whom.

    We are again on

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the outlook for a pretty and a skilful person! Do not take any trouble but if you meet one in the street please pick it up for me.  Express paid this end !!!

    I know you have felt our Isabel's* going away [is ? ] such a sad event.  A second telegram yesterday just before she left said "more comfortable. Come"  So I think they must really need her.  Indeed if he must die now her brother will be entirely dependent upon the companionship of this only child -- Good bye dear Mary.  Come soon to Boston again.

Yours affectionately
    Annie Fields.


Notes

Mme Blanc ... Th.B's: Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc. See Correspondents.

your aunt: Almost certainly Mrs. Helen Williams Gilman. See Correspondents.

Sarah: Sarah Orne Jewett. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Cabot: Susan Burley Cabot. See Correspondents.

Isabel: It seems clear that Isabel is an employee of Fields, but no further information has been located. Assistance is welcome.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in Letters from Annie Fields to Mary Rice Jewett, Jewett Family Papers: MS014.03.02.  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller. Coe College.



SOJ to Dorothy Ward

     South Berwick, Maine, January 20, 1900.

     My dear Dorothy, -- How good of you to send me this photograph by Sally, who came to bring it one day before I came away from Town! It made me wish to see you the least bit too much, and made me fall at once to thinking how long it is since I saw you in the summer weather at Stocks.* But one must look at it often in these sad conditions, and finally gather a good bit of companionship out of a photograph, it being all that one can get! If somebody would only invent a little speaking-attachment to such pictures, a nicer sort of phonograph, -- it would really be very nice; you might mentions this to your Aunt Ethel with my love.* Speaking-likenesses have not really been put into an eager market yet, in spite of the phrase being so old.

     I have been wishing to say these many days with what delight we have read the first number of the new story which opened in such a masterful way, and with such large promise. I am hoping for the same windfall which I had when "Sir George" was printing -- of some numbers ahead, -- but who knows if such luck will happen to me again? I think the American girl a very living person, the art and the sympathy that went to her writing are most wonderful. I am full of expectation and so is Mrs. Fields; we can hardly say to each other how much we liked that first number and count upon the second, and I have heard many another person say the same. It seems to me like a great success already, but I confess with wistfulness that every time a door opened, I hoped that it was Marcella coming in.* Do not speak coldly to me of the resources of a great novelist now that you have seen my heart!

     Have I owed you a letter for a very long time, dear Dorothy, or is it you who have thought that Sally would give me news and messages? This she has done, but I should so like a letter to myself from Stocks, with something about everybody, and even a word about the pony who brought us safe home, though such an unwilling person on the road. I hope that your Mother is just as well as the story sounds, -- and you must give her my dear love and true thanks. You will both like to know that Sally is looking very well this winter -- . . . dear child! I have not seen her half as much as I wish, for I have been much in the country, and it takes good bit more time to live in two places than in one. Mrs. Fields and I were much tempted in the autumn to go to Egypt with a friend* who asked us, but I do not like to think of being so far away from my sister, who would be very lonely. My nephew is still in Harvard,* and we three are all the house now, so that I have not the heart to take this one away, and leave but one in the old place. It is a delightful winter here as to weather, and yet the shadows and sorrows of war make it dark enough. The questions of our difficult Philippines are half forgotten -- it is almost strange to say so -- in the anxiety about South Africa;* but I like to take comfort from this, and other signs, and remember how much closer Old England and New England have come together in the last two years. That is good, at any rate. I had a most delightful proof of it in the way that many quite unexpected persons felt about a sketch I wrote (and meant to send to you!) called "The Queen's Twin." It was most touching to see how everybody approves it, and told little tales to prove that it might be true -- and was at any rate right in its sentiment!* But I must not write longer -- only to say that I thank you, dear, and that you must not forget to give my love to Jan.

Notes

Sally:  Almost certainly, Sally is Sara Norton.  See Correspondents.

Stocks: The home of Mrs. Humphry Ward and her daughter, Dorothy, in Albury, Hertfordshire, England.

Aunt Ethel:  Ethel M. Arnold (1965-1930) was the sister of Mrs. Humphry Ward and grand-daughter of Thomas Arnold, headmaster of Rugby School.  She became a noted journalist and lecturer on literary and other topics.  See Phyllis E. Wachter, "Ethel M. Arnold (1865-1930): New Woman Journalist," Victorian Periodicals Review 20: 3 (Fall, 1987), pp. 107-111.

new story ... "Sir George" ... MarcellaMary Augusta Ward (1851 -1920), a niece of Matthew Arnold, was a British novelist.  Mrs. Humphry Ward's Marcella appeared in 1894, Sir George Tressady in 1896.  Her novel, Eleanor, was serialized in Harper's New Monthly 1899-1901.  Dorothy Ward acted as her mother's secretary from the age of 16.

Egypt with a friend:  See SOJ to Rose Lamb, February 5, 1900.

nephew ... Harvard:  Theodore Eastman completed his A.B. at Harvard in 1901.  See Correspondents.

questions of our difficult Philippines ... the anxiety about South Africa: The Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia says "In the 1880s the writings of Jose Rizal (1861-96) helped spur Filipino demands for reform. Rizal's execution made him a national hero and sparked an unsuccessful revolution led by Emilio Aguinaldo. On June 12, 1898, after the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, Aguinaldo declared the Philippines independent in the mistaken belief that the United States supported his struggle. Instead, Spain ceded the Philippines to the United States. From 1899 to 1901, Aguinaldo led a war against his country's new colonial rulers."
    The South African or Boer War took place in 1899-1902, between Britain and Afrikaner settlers.

    Compare this letter by Jewett's close friend, Thomas Bailey Aldrich, to R. W. Gilder.


Hôtel de France et Choiseul,
Paris, April 27, 1899

My Dear Gilder, --
    If you are meditating a threnody on a certain contemporary of yours who disappeared nearly a year ago and has not been heard of, stay your hand, for in ten days or so from now he will return tot he land of the brave and the home of the oppressors of an unoffending people fighting for freedom and self-government -- as we did in 1776.  Suppose England had sold us to Germany, how would we have liked that?  When I think that we have bought the Filipinos, just as if they were so many slaves, I am not proud of my country.  I will not vote for McKinley again.  I would sooner vote for Bryan.  To be ruined financially is not so bad as to be ruined morally ....
Yours sincerely,
TBA

Greenslet, The Life of Thomas Bailey Aldrich, p. 204.


"The Queen's Twin": "The Queen's Twin," a "sequel" to The Country of the Pointed Firs, appeared in The Atlantic in February 1899 and was collected in The Queen's Twin (1899).

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.





SOJ to Henry Green

     148 Charles Street
     Boston
     January 28, [1900]

    Dear Elder Henry:

     I enclose a cheque for $15, for which will you please ask Eldress Fanny* to send this week a selection of pretty things about like those that were sent before. Perhaps there might be a few wooden things added, the work-boxes with handles and a closed box or two. Please direct the package to
     Mrs. Henry Parkman1
     30 Commonwealth Avenue
     Boston
and the express shall be paid at this end. I am much interested in a fair here for good objects, and my friends were much pleased with the idea of my getting a box from Alfred.*
     With kind love to all my Shaker friends, I am ever

     Yours sincerely,
     S. O. Jewett

     Please thank Eldress Lucinda for the pleasure I had in her kind Christmas letter.


Notes

     1 Mary Frances Parker Parkman (1855-1942), wife of the Boston lawyer and banker, was another of the Jewett-Fields coterie of artistic, literary, musical women who also devoted themselves to philanthropic causes. Mrs. Parkman assisted Sarah Wyman Whitman for many years in conducting these fairs for her adult Bible class at Trinity Church. Miss Jewett visited the Parkmans a number of summers at their home in Northeast Harbor, Mount Desert, Maine.

Editor's Notes

Eldress FannyThe Alfred, ME., Shaker photograph collection, ca. 1850-ca. 1940. includes photos of Elder Henry Green, Eldress Fanny Casey, and Eldress Lucinda Taylor.  Further information about these people is welcome.

Alfred:  The Shaker community at Alfred, ME was established 1783-93.  Wikipedia

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



Natalie Lord Rice Clark to SOJ

Feb. 1900
 

My dear Miss Jewett:

     For several years I have been wishing that I might some way thank you for the real men & women in your stories -- not because I thought it would so much matter to you what one of a multitude of readers thought, since you must already know what the multitude as a [mass?] thought! -- but simply because gratitude is an uncomfortable possession to keep to oneself. But since "The Queen's Twin"* came out, I have been deciding that I must take a moment of your time to thank you, very sincerely & earnestly, for the realities in that book.

     I think that wholly apart from the literary quality of the work, and inherently there, there is something that appeals to women -- perhaps especially to younger women -- in a way that calls out their belief in the goodness of life -- in the possibilities of life that may grow richer, even if the outward & material things grow poorer -- What I want to thank you for, & yet express so poorly, is that there is no poverty of soul in any outward poverty of which you write, -- but that such women as yours take their place as real souls in the world, and are of an infinite encouragement to other women, either in just such or wholly different surroundings -- It is this New England faith that I deeply thank you for -- I could say a good deal more, but after all this is the real kernel that may be daily renewing its strength or beauty of soul, where its bodily weakness is daily more apparent. And if younger women can just begin to believe this fact, & live it out, there is never a chance of their having that sort of unlovely age that not a few writers have been content to show in its unloveliness, without any bit of cheer or encouragement in their work. But your women -- and men too -- have set astir in the world [an?] actual force of encouragement -- of patience & cheer & hope. --

     I have taken more than [the?] minutes of time, -- and it almost seems grotesque for me to have written this out, since you know yourself what you tried to do, -- and you must have known long ago that you had not failed. Yet it is a comfort to me to have once said out to you what I have been so long grateful for. --

NLR.


Notes

The Queen's Twin:  Jewett's final story collection, The Queen's Twin (1899).

The ms. of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: bMS Am 1743 (40); transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

 

Thursday morning
[ February 1900 ]*

Dear Mary

            When I came in last evening toward six there was dear old Stubby* and I was so glad to see him!  He had every lofty particular of the flood,* and when he spoke of the Junction bridge* having gone down stream, I began to double all my feelings of being left out of every pleasure.  He stayed to dinner [--] he had not reached his laboratory work & Cambridge until toward noon the train being so late & then came back to town.  I think he went away about nine.

I was glad to hear both by his words & your letters that Mary Woods* is better.  Perhaps it is the grippe, though I hope not it is so much longer getting over itself! -- but I hear of people who are having that form of it just as they did the first winter it arrived.  After Katy’s funeral* yesterday I went to see a few people like dear old Mrs. Morse* who has been sick again -- and a nice little old maid of hers came to the door and told me that Mrs. Morse wasn’t seeing any one and then seeing who I was she said “Missis Morse said she’[d] see you any time of day or night if you’d happen to come.  Poor old lady think of her giving it out in that large way.  I hated to think I had been so delayed but we are great friends as you know and quite of an age!  I got to see Mrs. Tyson* too and had a nice dear call.  She said that Elise had just written that Isaac* was taken very sick & feverish & they had Dr. Emerson.*  I also went to see Georgie Perry* who was very nice, though I came right upon the scene, and I thought I would go to see Cora* but to my delight she was out at luncheon at the Dumaresq’s!*  Isn’t that a field!  Jane* was there for a week going home yesterday.  Ellen* had been sick & she looked so well and bright & was so nice & steady.  Annie* told me that Mrs. Rice* was getting a place for her on Newbury St. with an old lady & gentleman, but it didn’t seem very definite.

I stopped a minute at Alice Howe’s* & now all this is done. ---

A. F.* has just been in and with a great broad letty from Brother Robert,* coming next Wednesday I think it is: to stay until Monday.  She wrote him he must come before Sunday as there wouldn’t be opportunities for his staying after.  She said “Tell dear Mary she must come.  I shouldn’t know how to get along without her!”  The dress is here thank you so much, & now I can take it right with me this morning when I go to Mrs. Pierce’s.*  Goodby with much love

Sarah

& Love to Becca*


Notes

February 1900:  Though there is much evidence to support this composition date, there remains considerable uncertainty.  If "Katy" is Katherine Coolidge, who died in February 1900 and if Jewett refers to the relatively minor flooding of the Merrimack River in 1900, then this date is correct.  That Theodore Eastman clearly is studying at Harvard places the letter between 1898 and 1905.

Stubby:  Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents.

the flood ... Junction bridge: In February 1900, the Merrimack River in Massachusetts experienced major flooding.  The Junction bridge has not been identified, though it is possible Jewett refers to Lowell Junction south Andover, MA, on the Boston and Maine Railroad line.  The Junction bridge might then cross the Merrimack River near Lawrence, MA. Assistance is welcome.

Mary Woods: This person has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Katy's funeral: This is likely to be the funeral of Katherine Scollay Coolidge (1858 - 12 February 1900).  She was the daughter of Francis Parkman and author of a volume of poems, Voices (1899), and, posthumously, of selections from her diaries and letters -- Selections (1901).

Mrs. Morse: It seems likely that this is Harriet Jackson Lee (Mrs. Samuel Tapley) Morse.  See Frances Morse in Correspondents.

Mrs. Tyson:  Emily Tyson.  See Correspondents.

Elise ... Isaac:  Elise is Elizabeth Russell Tyson.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents.
    In The Placenames of South Berwick, Wendy Pirsig says that Isaac J. Gilliland (d. 1945) and his wife Annie, after immigrating from Ireland, entered the employ of Emily Tyson and then her daughter, Elise, helping to maintain the Hamilton House property.  Isaac was a teamster, and Annie was a cook (pp. 58-9).

Dr. Emerson:  The Jewett-Fields circle of acquaintance included the physician Edward Waldo Emerson (1844-1930) of Concord, MA, son of Ralph Waldo Emerson. However, it seems odd that he would travel to South Berwick to treat a Tyson employee.  Assistance is welcome.

Georgie Perry:  This person's identity is not known, though it is known that a Georgie Perry was a socially active resident of Cambridge, MA in the 1890s.  She may have been the daughter of Samuel T. Perry and Emily Augusta Adams Perry.  Find-a-Grave.

Cora:  Probably Cora Clark Rice.  See Correspondents.

Dumaresq's: The Dumaresq family has long history in Boston.  It is not known, however, with which member Cora was lunching.

Jane ... Ellen:  These women remain unidentified.  That they are referred to by first name suggests that they are either employees or very close friends. That they seem to be visiting socially among Jewett's friends suggests that they are friends.  Jewett had several reasonably close friends with both names. Could she be referring to Jane Mifflin, wife of her publisher? and to Ralph Waldo Emerson's daughter, Ellen Tucker Emrson (1839-1909)?

Annie ... Mrs. Rice:  Mrs. Rice may be Cora Clark Rice's mother.  Annie appears to be a woman seeking domestic employment; her identity is not yet known.

Alice Howe's:  Alice Greenwood (Mrs. George Dudley) Howe. See Correspondents.

A. F.: Annie Adams Fields. See Correspondents.

Brother Robert:  Dr. Robert Collyer. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Pierce:  Richard Cary says: "Anne Longfellow (1810-1901) mar¬ried George W. Pierce, described by the poet as 'brother-in-law and dearest friend'."  However, it is not perfectly clear that this is Jewett's destination.

Becca:  Rebecca Young.  See Correspondents.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



 SOJ to Sara Norton

     South Berwick, Maine.
    [Spring 1900]*

     My dear Sally, -- It was too bad about your missing Lady Macbeth. I wished much for you, and indeed Madame Modjeska was unexpectedly fine, quite nobly beautiful.* She did two or three things which I must put among the very best I have ever seen on the stage. One felt true greatness in her playing. I used to think of her as quite charming and most intelligent and often vigorous, but she went far beyond all these that night. You would have cared very much for her, but alas, one must miss such pleasures. I don't like to think of your losing a day now and then, dear, except that there must come a "break" and a Sunday, somehow! I don't know what we should do if we were not stopped by force now and then, -- the scheme of our life is built on unending activity, or else an active New England conscience falls to upbraiding us.

     I have been busy enough since I came home, chiefly here at the old desk. There are a great many birds already, robins and song-sparrows have all come, but there are some old snow-drifts sitting round on the hills to keep watch.

Notes

1900:  Annie Fields groups this letter with others of the 1898-99 period.  On this slim basis, I have dated this letter to follow Modjeska's January 1900 tour performances in Boston.  See note below.

Lady Macbeth. ... Madame Modjeska
: William Shakespeare's (1564-1616) tragedy of Macbeth was first performed in about 1606. Madame Helena Modjeska (1840-1909) the internationally famous Shakespearean actor became a United States citizen in 1883 and, thereafter lived, performed, and toured in the United States. Her roles often included Lady Macbeth. After becoming a U.S. citizen, she began years of touring the country with her acting company.  In The History of the Boston Theatre, 1854-1901 (1908), Eugene Tompkins and Quincy Kilby report that Modjeska performed Lady Macbeth in Boston in January 1890 (p. 320), December-January 1895-6 (p. 433), and January 1900 (p. 473).

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




 SOJ to Sara Norton

     Hotel Bristol, Naples, 18 March, 1900.

     I tell you but short tales of our very stormy and difficult voyage and of water deep in our staterooms and boats going away in the gale, and a beating about in one's berth that I have hardly got over yet, but will go on to say that we have had some good days in Naples and have just come back from two nights at my beloved La Cava with its pigeon towers and reminders of Sir Walter on his last journey.* I have been to Pæstum again, which joy I never expected, and we also had some hours on Friday at Pompeii.* We were going up to Ravello for a night at least, but it is quite bitter cold weather just now and has turned to pouring rain, so that this Sunday morning we hurried back to our most comfortable quarters here. We still have until Wednesday, when we start for Brindisi and Patras. We have had the best of chances to see the Museum here. There is nothing so beautiful as this Orpheus and Eurydice, and I fairly ran to find a certain little Pompeiian picture of the girl who turns back to gather flowers! I wonder if you remember it? It is one of the perfectly un-copyable things. The spring in Italy seems very cold and late; there aren't green leaves enough, and everything has a sort of bony look that makes the really unlovely things almost unbearable. I caught myself thinking yesterday as I passed one of the poorer and newer villages that it was ugly, and that I could prefer the sight of one of our own little manufacturing towns with its quaint rows of sharp gables and even its apparent danger of blowing away! But the grey fig trees are beginning to show little green silk tufts, and the olives are quite dark and splendid on the hills back of Salerno,-- as thick and warm and tufted as one of my own hills of pines. You see what a New England -- I may say State of Maine -- person now holds the pen! These olives are so much richer than the olives in Provence where I saw them last: I can't say how beautiful they were yesterday.

     It is a wonderful old Italy though I accuse it so cheaply of cold and bleakness. Right in front of me is a flower of asphodel which we brought from Pæstum yesterday, but the pink cyclamen were not yet in bloom and very few daffodils.

Notes

La Cava with its pigeon towers and reminders of Sir Walter on his last journey:  John G. Lockhart in volume 5 of his Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott (1902 edition, pp. 401-403) recounts Scott's visit to the Benedictine Monastery of La Trinità della Cava near Naples. He says Scott enjoyed this more than any other site during his last visit to Italy in 1832. Lockhart also explains that the pigeon-towers were "blinds" from which to shoot pigeons.

Pæstum ... Pompeii .. RavelloWikipedia says: Paestum was a major ancient Greek city on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea in Magna Graecia (southern Italy). The ruins of Paestum are famous for their three ancient Greek temples in the Doric order, dating from about 600 to 450 BC...."
    "Pompeii was an ancient Roman town-city near modern Naples, in the Campania region of Italy, in the territory of the comune of  Pompeii, along with Herculaneum and many villas in the surrounding area, was mostly destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) of volcanic ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79."
    "Ravello is a town and comune situated above the Amalfi Coast in the province of Salerno, Campania, southern Italy, with approximately 2,500 inhabitants. Its scenic beauty makes it a popular tourist destination...."

Brindisi and PatrasWikipedia says: "Brindisi ... is a city in the region of Apulia in southern Italy, the capital of the province of Brindisi, off the coast of the Adriatic Sea. Historically, the city has played an important role in trade and culture, due to its strategic position on the Italian Peninsula and its natural port on the Adriatic Sea."
   "Patras ... is Greece's third largest city and the regional capital of Western Greece, in northern Peloponnese, 215 km (134 mi) west of Athens. The city is built at the foothills of Mount Panachaikon, overlooking the Gulf of Patras."

Orpheus and Eurydice:  According to Karl Baedeker's Southern Italy and Sicily 15th Edition (1908), "The Relief of Orpheus, Eurydice, and Hermes" is one of the treasures of the National Museum in Naples, where it was at that time in Room VI on the central pillar of the entrance hall, Item #6727. It depicts Hermes come to take Eurydice back to Hades after Orpheus has failed to meet the condition for her release of not looking back as he leads her out.

Orpheus

Orpheus, Eurydice and Hermes.
Relief. Roman copy of the Augustan age from a Greek original of the second half of 5th cent. BCE by Alcamenes, disciple of Phidias.
Marble.
Inv. 6727.
Naples, National Archaeological Museum

a certain little Pompeiian picture of the girl who turns back to gather flowers: It is probable that Jewett refers to a fresco now thought to represent Flora, which is in the second case at the National Museum of Naples, according to Baedeker (1908).

Girls <
Source unknown
Another photo is available at Wikimedia Commons


This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc

     Naples1
     March 18, [1900]

    Dear friend:

     It was such a joy to know that you are again in La Ferté2 and that Marie and Louise are looking after you there! I have been so sadly worried about you all these weeks. I am sure that you will be better now, but I know too well how long one must be in shaking off the fetters of weakness and depression after the influenza. I have hardly even yet got free from my attack of last year. You must not try to push yourself to write, or to go much where people are talking. I long to see you now, and I hope that the weeks will fly fast away until I can get to Paris. I wonder if you will not be at La Ferté? Cannot I come for a night there? Only a few days before your letter came I was wishing that I could go there some day of our short stay, and take again that lovely drive to Jouarre. I cannot think of anything so delightful as to do just that. But first you will go to Paraÿs,3 and I hope that the change will be of great benefit.
     We had a very hard voyage. I was quite used up by it but I begin now to feel like myself again. We have had very cold weather here but Annie and Miss Garrett4 and I are getting on well on the whole. We have just spent one day at Pompeii and another at Paestum and today we are taking a quiet Sunday. We leave here for Athens on Wednesday, where you might be good enough to write us at the Hôtel Grande Bretagne.
     It is late and I must not write any more, but send this letter half-written and only filled with love. Pray give my kindest remembrance to Monsieur et Madame Delzant5 if you are already with them. I am so glad to hear that Madame Delzant is better.

     Yours most affectionately,
     Sarah

     Pray give my best messages to Monsieur Blanc.6


Notes

     1 On her fourth and final sojourn in Europe Miss Jewett stopped in Italy, Greece, Turkey, and France, where she did see Madame Blanc for the last time.
     2 La Ferté sous Jouarre, site of Madame Blanc's country house, a town in the Department of Seine et Marne, some forty miles east of Paris.
     3 Paraÿs, the home town of Alidor and Gabrielle Delzant, in the Department of Lot et Garonne, approximately four hundred miles southwest of Paris.
     4 Mary Elizabeth Garrett (1854-1915), daughter of John W. Garrett, president of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, was one of the five founders of The Bryn Mawr School in 1885, an early supporter of Bryn Mawr College, and a generous contributor toward the establishment of the Johns Hopkins Medical School. She kept a cottage at Dark Harbor, Maine, where Miss Jewett stayed in the summer of 1895 before proceeding to Martinsville and writing The Country of the Pointed Firs. Miss Jewett dedicated Betty Leicester's Christmas "To M. E. G."
     5 Alidor Delzant (1848-1905), a bibliophile, editor, and author, wrote among other works a biography of the brothers Goncourt.
     His wife Gabrielle (1854-1903) was cited by Violet Paget for the "admirableness of her brains" and her "extraordinary charm of high breeding." Madame Delzant, an aspiring author, compiled extensive memoranda and rough drafts of books on Port Royal and the Princesse de Liancourt but did not live to publish them. Her husband edited Gabrielle Delzant: Letters, Souvenirs (1904).
     6 Madame Blanc's connubial experience was short and unhappy. She was married at 16, a mother at 17, divorced at 19. Thirty years passed before she saw her husband again, but he was in constant attendance during her last illness, and she bequeathed all her possessions to him. Alexandre Blanc, a financier, lost his money and estate in speculation.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ


March 23, 1900. Studio.

     . . . You have been gone 1000 years, and though to you it is as one day, do not forget the American standpoint, as you drink the wine of Attica or sip the honey of Hymettus.* Remember the difference between the active, transitive, and the neuter verb; remember that in Europe you do what you expect to do, in America that which is expected of you; and give thanks that you are not as other men are!*  I can't even remember when you went away; it is so long, counting by the sense of loss, and by the humbled remembrance of human demand which has been in a state of turbulent activity. Radcliffe has been exacting because of changes in the Board and questions of development, the Museum School* has questions to meet, there is to be an Artists' Festival and preparations therefor, and every stranger on earth has decided to visit Boston. Everyone, even my unworthy self, has had grippe more or less* so that the city record may be reported as 150,000 cases for the year!
     But I must tell you, friend, that after a little visit from Georgy Schuyler,* (she came back in a week to see me,) in which she had a taste of all that Boston can boast of Art, Literature, and Religion; then there appeared Dr. Weir Mitchell to have his Portrait painted and be entertained by the Tavern Club.* It is a terrible thing to have your delightful sitter staying under your roof! To be pouring coffee and urging repose for the very person whose canvas is waiting in Boylston Street is one of the tests of character,* and I will not say how much mine has lost or gained under this fire. But at all events the portrait has made a reasonable good beginning, in spite of 'dining and wining,' and the fact that the Edinboro' gown* is an artistic solecism being of a red-and-blue as if one were wrapped in the American Flag. The Tavern dinner was really brilliant with Norton, Holmes, Wister, and Münsterberg and all the rest.* Owen made a gay beginning to a very serious and eloquent speech, by telling what his associations were with the Club as a founder, when they were young and ignorant. "I return after many years," he said, "to find it changed into a Den of Lions, and what am I but a little Daniel in the midst of them!"* I record here my belief that Owen is going on, and that his moral force is potentially very large.
     But this is only written to send love, and to complain that there is no message in the stars, and one is only keeping content when one consults the Calendar and not the Heart, and sees that the days are too few for report though not for expectation.
     Greeting to the August Ladies* who are in your company, from S. W.


Notes

wine of Attica: Also known as "retsina," a resinated wine, legendary in Greek history. Research: Gabe Heller.

honey of Hymettus: Honey gathered by the ancient bee-keepers of Athens, famous for its sweetness and legendary powers. (Research: Gabe Heller).

give thanks that you are not as other men are: See Luke 18:11.

Radcliffe has been exacting: Whitman was chair of the House Committee at Radcliffe.

Museum School has questions: It is likely Whitman refers to the school of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, but this has not been confirmed. Assistance is welcome.

grippe: French, a cold.

Georgy Schuyler ... Dr. Weir Mitchell:  Georgina Schuyler (1841-1923) lived with her sister Louisa Lee Schuyler (1837-1926) on Park Avenue in New York City.  Wikipedia says: "Louisa Schuyler ... was an early American leader in charitable work, particularly noted for founding the first nursing school in the United States."  Georgina was her partner in her philanthropic work.  The New York Times (May 6, 1903, p. 9) reports that Georgina Schuyler donated the bronze plaque with the sonnet, "The New Colossus," by her friend Emma Lazarus, that appears at the Statue of Liberty in New York City.
    Silas Weir Mitchell (1829-1914) was one of the best-known American physicians of the nineteenth century, famed for his "rest cure" for nervous diseases such as neurasthenia. He was the author of a pair of historical novels as well as of poetry and biography.

Tavern Club: The "Tavern Club" was a Boston men's eating club, founded in 1884 on Park Square in Boston. It remains a venue for dinners and gatherings after Harvard symposia. (Research: Gabe Heller).

Boylston Street: A principal street in Boston, running between Boston Common and the Back Bay Fens.  Erica Hirschler, in A Studio of Her Own (2001) pp. 39, 199)  points out that Whitman's Lily Glassworks Studio was at 184 Boylston St. after 1887.

Edinboro' gown:   According to Wikipedia, Silas Weir Mitchell studied at the University of Pennsylvania and earned his MD at Jefferson Medical College in 1850.  He received honorary LL.D. (Doctor of Laws) degrees from Harvard and from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. Wikipedia says that the official LL.D. gown of the University of Edinburgh is "Black cloth, with appended cape, lined and faced with blue silk."  Therefore, Whitman's choice of red-and-blue is for artistic reasons rather than for historical accuracy.
    It is likely that the portrait below is Whitman's, though this is not certain.  It is available courtesy of U. S. National Library of Medicine, where it appears without attribution in "Dr. S. Weir Mitchell's Literary Career" (2003) by Margaret Kaiser.

S. W. Mitchell

Norton, Holmes, Wister, and Münsterberg: Wikipedia says: "Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. (1841 - 1935) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1902 to 1932, ..." Charles Eliot Norton (1827-1908) was co-editor of the North American Review (1863-1868) and then professor of literature and art at Harvard University. He was the author of James Russell Lowell (1893) and the editor of a number of Lowell's works. Owen Wister (1860-1938), an American writer, is best remembered for The Virginian (1902). Probably Whitman refers to Hugo Munsterberg (1863-1916), a psychological researcher at Harvard beginning in the 1890s.

Den of Lions ... Daniel: See the Bible, Daniel 6.

August Ladies:  Jewett traveled to Europe with Annie Fields and Mary Garrett.  See Correspondents.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



SOJ to Sarah Wyman Whitman

 
     Athens, 27 March, 1900.

     Then we came to Brindisi, an all-day journey through green valleys and between great ranges of the Apennines, all topped with snow, and took the steamer which got to Corfu* next day and to Greece the next, and then we were all day again in the trains going along the southern shore of the Gulf of Corinth, and at sunset we saw the light on the Acropolis and all the great pillars of the Parthenon high against the sky.* And pretty near every waking hour since then I have wished for you at least once. There is nothing for it but to go to the Museum every morning, and to the Acropolis every afternoon.

     We make many plots for the next few weeks. To go to Megara, for instance, to see the Easter Dances.* But oh, how I wish for you! It is quite true that there is nothing so beautiful as Athens, the Parthenon and the marbles in the Museum.* I don't suppose that you have been waiting for me to assure you of this fact; but when I think what you would say, and feel, at the sight of this spring landscape and the wintry sky, of such astonishing blue, with its blinding light, like one of our winter mornings after a snow-storm and the colors of the mountain ranges and the sea, dazzling and rimmed by far-off islands and mountains to the south; as one looks from the Acropolis and all the spring fields below and the old columns and the little near-by flowers, poppies and daisies, -- Oh, when I see all this and think that you can't see it, too! And then, when I remember what my feelings have been toward the Orpheus and Eurydice and the Bacchic Dance,* and then see these wonderful marbles here, row upon row, it is quite too much for a plain heart to bear. I have come to the place where I can get quickly through the rooms, but I must look at a certain nine every time and spend all the time (at present) that I can get before a special one (or two). If the special one were not next that which has the young man with his dog, and the old father, and the little weeping slave-boy,* I should have to divide the aforesaid time into two. It isn't the least bit of use to try to write about those marbles, but they are simply the most human and affecting and beautiful things in the world. The partings, the promises, are immortal and sacred, they are Life and not only Lives; and yet the character in them is almost more than the art to me, being a plain story-writer, but full of hopes and dreams.

     This was a little flower for you that grew on the Hill today.* I feel as if this letter were too dry and crumpled to send, just as the flower is, with none of the life of the things it tries to stand for.

Notes

Brindisi .... CorfuWikipedia says: "Brindisi ... is a city in the region of Apulia in southern Italy, the capital of the province of Brindisi, off the coast of the Adriatic Sea. Historically, the city has played an important role in trade and culture, due to its strategic position on the Italian Peninsula and its natural port on the Adriatic Sea."
    "Corfu ... is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands, and, including its small satellite islands, forms the northwestern-most part of Greece"

Athens ... Acropolis ... ParthenonAthens, the capital of Greece, contains a number of ancient buildings and artifacts.  "The Parthenon ... is a former temple on the Athenian Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the goddess Athena, whom the people of Athens considered their patron. Construction began in 447 BC when the Athenian Empire was at the peak of its power. It was completed in 438 BC although decoration of the building continued until 432 BC."

Megara ... Easter Dances: Megara is a town in east central Greece, famed for the biennial Easter dances of the women, which attract visitors from Athens, according to Baedeker's Greece: Handbook for Travellers, 2nd Revised Edition, 1894.  Easter fell on 15 April 1900.

the Museum:  This is the Acropolis Museum.

Orpheus and Eurydice ...Bacchic Dance ... wonderful marbles ... the special one ... next that which has the young man with his dog, and the old father, and the little weeping slave-boy: These works are in the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. They impressed Jewett so much that she remembers them vividly when she later writes to Louisa Loring during Louisa's visit to Athens (November 3, 1904). Karl Baedeker's Greece: Handbook for Travellers includes a quotation from Goethe about the mourning sculptures that shows him similarly impressed (103).

the Hill:  The Acropolis.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to
Alice Dunlap Gilman

     Athens
     March 31, 1900

    Dearest Cousin Alice:

     The two names of places at the head of this paper seem strangely put together,1 but here I am, strange as it seems to me, and I have so often thought of you in the ten days since I came and wished to answer your most kind letter which reached me in Naples in my first mail from home. You were so kind to ask me to come to Brunswick and I should have been delighted to do so had I been at home. I was very much interested about my works being dramatized! and it gave me more pleasure than I can say to think that Brunswick was going to do them so much honor.2 I am sure that dear little Mary would do great honor to the heroine of "Mr. Teaby." She seems small for the part except in the size of her heart, and I may say young, but I don't doubt that she could make up in costume.3
     I am only away for a short time (I shall be at home the last of May), I am glad to say, for though I enjoy travelling quite as much if not more than most people, I hate the feeling of being so far away from home, and I often have to pinch hard to keep myself from giving way to homesickness in spite of every possible satisfaction and pleasure.
     It is delightful to find how much more beautiful Greece is than anybody ever gave me the idea. One must see the old marbles and the hill of the Parthenon for oneself, and nobody can write anything like the charm and the astonishing beauty of these old sights.
     Day before yesterday we drove to Marathon (twenty-five miles) and saw the famous plain with its great mound of earth that has stood so many centuries over the Athenian soldiers, and the bright sea in front of it and the dark mountains behind. You would have loved the gay wildflowers almost best of all -- they really made a brilliant carpet for the ground. There were little marigolds and big scarlet and purple anemones much larger than our pale ones, and two kinds of poppies and big blue forget-me-nots and tall stalks of asphodel and all sorts of things, and pale purple gillyflowers all along the beach with our familiar beach peas. And the old olive trees are most beautiful; they seem as old as the mountains and plains themselves. I must put in some leaves for you so you can imagine how silvery the trees look when the wind blows them.
     Give my love to Cousin Charles and to the girls and to David and Charlie. I do hope that Cousin Charles is nicely now as spring comes on. I shall certainly hope to see you all this summer either in Brunswick or Berwick or still better in both.
     I thank you again for your letter which was a double pleasure so far away. Yours, with constant affection,
     Sarah
     I am sure Mrs. Fields* would send you and Cousin Charles a message but she has gone to sleep just now. She is very well indeed and enjoys everything so much.

Notes

     1 The familiar printed letterhead -- SOUTH BERWICK, MAINE -- is nullified by an undulant scrawl and is superseded by the handwritten Athens dateline.
     2 At the Pythian Hall on March 24, the Saturday Club, a local organization addicted to periodic "dramatic presentations," offered to the public its versions of Miss Jewett's short stories "The Quest of Mr. Teaby" and "The Guests of Mrs. Timms."
     3 Mary Gilman, 34, played the role of "elderly," procrastinating Hannah Jane Pinkham in this lyric of autumnal love, "The Quest of Mr. Teaby."  [For more on members of the Gilman family, Cousin Charles and their children, See Correspondents.]


Editor's notes

Mrs. Fields:  Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by the Sarah Orne Jewett Papers, George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections and Archives, Bowdoin College Library.





SOJ to Sarah Wyman Whitman 

 Megalopolis, 15 April [1900]*


     This is a small town in Arcadia in the middle of a green plain, to which we came over the mountains yesterday, driving for the third, fourth, fifth or sixth day on our journey from the east coast to the west, by Nauplia and Mycenæ and Epidaurus to Tripolitza and Sparta. As I write these names, I cannot help thinking how lately they were nothing but names; and now each stands for a place unlike any other, and each makes a great landscape rise before one of mountain and plain and great white columns against the blue sky and blinding light, and all the Greek flowers bloom again, asphodels here, and poppies there.

     Here in this muddy, noisy little place, we are opposite the old church with its bell-tower and single tall cypress, and it is the Greek Palm Sunday, just a week later than ours.* And all the flocks go tinkling by, and all the little boys are playing games and squabbling like sparrows over in the church-yard. But at home I think of the Class at Easter, and Katy not there and I not there, and I keep wondering about you, and if Coolidge* will have come, and I should like to have a flower in a letter so as to know you thought of me. I got your dear last letter this week, and heard about Dr. Mitchell and Owen Wister,* and all those flowering days of mid-March, and I wish I could pass judgment right now on the portrait. It begins to feel as if we had really come away for a short time, and as if I should be at home again in six weeks if all goes well, but up to this day I have had a queer sense of being off in space, with months before me; of wandering in the East, with dragomen* and cooks, and all our bags and shawl-straps to be taken out of the carriage and opened at night, and rolled up and shut again and loaded in the mornings, with a huge new-old stone theatre to see in a hill-side, and the snow mountains looking over the tops of the purple ones in every quarter of Greece. How you would love the handsome sturdy people and the clear-eyed children. Such colors to paint and such glimpses of history in every shepherd on the hills and every hoplite* that stalks along the endless roads in his white kilt and stockings and his red cap. Greece is most archaic still to the casual looker-on.

     We are just bound down to the coast this afternoon, where we shall take a steamer to the neighborhood of Olympia, and then, if we can get time enough, we go to Delphi before getting back to Athens on the 22d. Then we mean to go on eastward for a single week in Constantinople, even if it costs us the sight of Thessaly; but whether we do the one or the other is uncertain to me in this present moment, for sometimes we think of things we might see in six days to be spent at sea getting back to Venice! But I keep thinking that I shall never be, so to speak, so handy to Constantinople again, and I should like to have the means of making the Arabian Nights come true.* And we shall really have seen so much of Greece.

     I send you much love and many a thought, and I wish that I could put half the things into this letter that you would like to read and I to write. But you must take this leaf of Bay instead,* and call it Palm Sunday or Easter, just as you like.


Notes

MegalopolisWikipedia says:  "Megalopoli is a town in the southwestern part of the regional unit of Arcadia, southern Greece. It is located in the same site as ancient Megalopolis."

Greek Palm Sunday, just a week later than ours:  Easter for Western Christians fell on 15 April 1900, so, in fact, Palm Sunday in Greece in 1900 is two weeks later than in the United States -- assuming that this letter is correctly dated.

Class at Easter, and Katy not there ... Coolidge: In his notes for SOJ to Henry Green, January 28, [1900], Richard Cary says that S. W. Whitman conducted an adult Bible class at Trinity Church in Boston.  See also Rita Gollin, Annie Fields (p. 254). Presumably, Jewett is referring to this class.  Coolidge almost certainly is Susan Coolidge, pen name of Sarah Chauncey Woolsey (1835-1905), author of the What Katy Did stories and many other books. (See Cary, Sarah Orne Jewett Letters, p. 77, and also Sarah Chauncey Woolsey (Susan Coolidge).
    Katy may be Katherine Scollay Coolidge (1858 - 12 February 1900), a friend who died shortly before Jewett departed on this trip to Europe.  Katherine Coolidge was the daughter of Francis Parkman and author of a volume of poems, Voices (1899), and, posthumously, of selections from her diaries and letters -- Selections (1901).

Dr. Mitchell and Owen Wister:  Silas Weir Mitchell (1829-1914) was one of the best-known American physicians of the nineteenth century, famed for his "rest cure" for nervous diseases such as neurasthenia. He was the author of a pair of historical novels as well as of poetry and biography.  In Whitman's letter to Jewett of March 23, 1900, to which this letter responds, Whitman tells of Mitchell sitting for his portrait.
     Owen Wister (1860-1938), an American writer best remembered for The Virginian (1902), also is mentioned in that letter.

dragomen: A dragoman is Arabic interpreter and/or guide.

hoplite: A heavily armed ancient Greek infantry soldier.

Arabian nights: Arabian Nights' Entertainments or The Thousand and One Nights. This collection of middle-eastern and south Asian stories originally written in Arabic became popular in Europe in the 17th Century. The collection is framed by the story of a king who kills each of his wives the morning after their wedding night. His latest wife, Scheherazade saves her life by telling exciting stories and stopping each night before the end, so the king must spare her until the next night to hear the end of that story and the beginning of another.

leaf of bay: in this case, a literal leaf of laurel, a leaf used for flavoring soups and sauces and medicinally for indigestion, headache, and rheumatism; but also used in crowns to honor poets in ancient Greece.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Elizabeth C. Field

     Constantinople
     May 4, 1900

    My dear friend (and Betty Leicester's!):

     You did not think when you wrote such a kind little letter that it would have to go so far to find me, and I am so sorry that it happened so, because if I had been at home I should have written very soon to thank you and your mother for a great pleasure. I am very glad that you both like my stories, and I hope that I may see you both someday to say better than I can now, how much I liked your letters. I shall not forget that you cared about Betty and Mary Beck, because while I was writing about them I grew very fond of them myself, and of Tideshead which I tried to write like my old and dear village of South Berwick in Maine as it was when I was your age. Now that I am older I find it every summer a little larger and busier and more like a large town, but then it was very green and quiet and you could nearly always hear the bobolinks or the golden robins when you stopped to listen. I should like to tell you which chapter of Betty I care about most -- it is the one where Betty goes 'up-country' with Serena to spend the day,1 but perhaps you will not like it as much as some of the others.
     I wish that you were here with me, looking out of this window that seems to open right into the Arabian Nights!* I can see all sorts of turbans and men with trays of sweetmeats and women with funny veils over their faces, and I can see tops of mosques and minarets, and beautiful horses, and the queer wild dogs that live in Constantinople as if it were all their own. They don't belong to anybody but themselves, and they go about in funny little companies hunting for something to eat, though they don't look thin or troubled with anxieties of any sort, and when they are sleepy they take naps on the sidewalk or in the street and everybody turns out for them and steps over them carefully. Someday if you see them you must remember that I wrote about them and liked to see them too, but that I thought they barked a good deal every night!
     I am writing you a long letter, but I suppose that it is because I feel sure we should find many things to say if we were together. I hope that I shall see you someday, and I hope that I shall see your mother, and I send you both my love and thanks now, and when we do meet we must be a little like old friends, mustn't we? -- as if we had known each other a great while.

     Yours most affectionately, dear little Elizabeth.*
     Sarah O. Jewett

Notes

     1Betty Leicester (1890), Chapter X. This peripatetic pattern was a favorite with Miss Jewett. It afforded her the opportunity to describe local countryside, the unique individuals to be encountered there, the universal custom of visiting, the details of interiors. In this chapter Miss Jewett presents the germ of the character which she developed fully in "The Queen's Twin" a decade later.
    Betty, Mary Beck and Serena are characters in Betty Leicester, which is set in Tidewater.


Editor's Notes

Arabian nightsArabian Nights' Entertainments or The Thousand and One Nights. This collection of middle-eastern and south Asian stories originally written in Arabic became popular in Europe in the 17th Century. The collection is framed by the story of a king who kills each of his wives the morning after their wedding night. His latest wife, Scheherazade saves her life by telling exciting stories and stopping each night before the end, so the king must spare her until the next night to hear the end of that story and the beginning of another.
    See also SOJ to Sarah Wyman Whitman 15 April [1900].

little Elizabeth:  Elizabeth Campbell Field (1891 - 1980) was about nine years old at the time of this letter.  See Correspondents.

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Additional notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to
Marie Thérèse de Solms Blanc

     June 17, [1900]

    Dearest friend:

     I am so sorry that two weeks have passed since I came ashore and yet I have not sent you a single word. But my eye was still strained and I have had to be careful with it, and I have been as busy as I could be going once to Boston and to Manchester the day Annie moved down, and hurrying with some proofs and writing affairs that kept me from using my eyes for other things. So this is the first foreign letter to get itself begun, when I have others to write, you may be sure! And I have had your card from La Ferté and been so sorry for your anxiety about your son. It seems such a pity after his good journey.
     I am thinking so often about your work and hoping it is already finished and quite to your mind. I cannot say how eager I am to see it.1 Annie's copy of the Revue is not yet in hand. She thinks that the subscription ran out while we were away but we shall soon get hold of it.
     They are urging me almost irresistibly just now to give a long story to the Atlantic for next year, and I cannot yet dare to promise. I am so fixed in the habit of making short stories that I am not sure of being able to do the sort of thing I wish to do, of another sort -- you must say what you think!2
     I cannot help being glad that you got my note from Cherbourg though I often thought with shame of that much fumbled envelope which I discovered in a corner of my bag, in some useful capacity!
     It was such a joy to have that beautiful glimpse of Acosta.3 I feel so disappointed at having seen dear Madame de Beaulaincourt4 so very little, but after all I have seen her again. And I have seen you, dear, thank Heaven! Oh, do keep it always in mind that you are coming again next year.
     Theodore came home from college last night -- a great event in the family -- for his long vacation.5 He was heard loudly demanding "where this beautiful new silver dish came from?" Mary thanks you many times for her share, and I thank you all over again. It is lovely, with green oak leaves and green leaves and white flowers. I love it very much.

     Good night, do write as often as you can to your most loving
     S. O. J.


Notes

     1Tchelovek, a novel, appeared in four installments in the Revue des Deux Mondes from June 1 through July 15, 1900.
    2 Against her own better judgment and the advice of her friends, Miss Jewett acceded to the editorial importunities and wrote The Tory Lover, an historical novel quite outside her mode. It was serialized in the Atlantic Monthly from November 1900 through August 1901, and published as a volume by Houghton, Mifflin & Company in September 1901.*
    3 The Chateau d'Acosta, Madame de Beaulaincourt's out-of-town residence, was situated at St. Gratien, some ten miles north of Paris.
     4 Ruth Charlotte Sophie de Beaulaincourt (1818-1904) was the daughter of the Maréchal Boniface de Castellane, a soldier who served with distinction under both Napoleons, and whose Journals she published in five volumes (1896-1898). An intimate of princesses and prime ministers, she counted Prosper Merimée and the Empress Eugénie among her friends. After a youthful career of uninhibited ardors, she had settled down to a staid existence in which the making of artificial flowers was now her chief distraction. Her salon, one of the most scintillating in Paris, was enhanced by her voluble wit. Marcel Proust, a protégé and regular attendant, used her as the model for Madame de Villeparisis in Remembrance of Things Past.
     Comtesse de Beaulaincourt had cherished Madame Blanc's mother, and continued in cordial relationship with Thérèse.
     5 Theodore Eastman attended Harvard College from 1897 to 1901, when he received his A.B. degree.

Editor's Notes

better judgment and the advice of her friends:  Cary may be giving too much weight to the ambivalence of contemporary responses and the general agreement of later critics that The Tory Lover is not a successful novel.  As letters of 1900 and 1901 indicate, Jewett in fact received a good deal of encouragement from her friends to write this book, notably from Charles Dudley Warner.  See below,  Charles Dudley Warner to SOJ [ Summer 1900 ].

This letter is edited and annotated by Richard Cary in Sarah Orne Jewett Letters; the ms. is held by Colby College Special Collections, Waterville, Maine.  Additional notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.


John White Chadwick to SOJ

[Begin letterhead]

Hilltop
Chesterfield, Mass.

[End letterhead]

July 15, 1900

My dear Miss Jewett --

     Every summer we have a new book of yours to read on the hills. We read them out of doors: Mrs. Chadwick reads them to me as we drive about the country, so shortening the long steep hills. "The Queen's Twin" was bought last x'mas & saved till now when it has given great delight. We have both laughed & cried over the stories, especially over "Where's Nora?" and "Martha's Lady." Your dear Mrs. Todd I see continually in the [awafe?] of a dear Mrs. Dodd who was my childhood's friend & whom I always go to see when I return to Marblehead -- a [proper?] but comfortable soul!

     I have often meant to write & thank you for the pleasure you have given us, tho I can well imagine that our more added to the multitude of such testimonies will hardly be appreciated as of any worth. It seems to me that few in our generation have a right to be happier than you. You have given so much sweet & wholesome pleasure & without moralizing you have done so much good. For I do not see how it is possible for so many to read your stories & not a few be bettered by the inspirations of kindliness [which?] they afford or consoled by the compassion & life of those beings that live & breathe along your genial page. Thank you & bless you!

Very truly yours

John W. Chadwick
 

for Miss Sarah Orne Jewett.


Note

The ms. of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: bMS Am 1743 (39); transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

 

7 A. M. July 27, 1900
Stocks, Tring, England.*

     The doves and all the other sweet sounds of this English summer are making a sort of symphony in the air, and I am a-preparing to return early, for late breakfast, in short, after tea in this idyllic garden and an evening of large hospitality and happiness. . . . I had a real talk with Mrs. Ward under the trees; and all this has been a lasting pleasure. . . . So from out this shelter (a word which takes on such inexplicable perfume as life grows longer) and on this lyric morning, I have this one word with you. I think it is because you love me that I am here; and that is sweet. Heaven bless you!


Notes

Stocks, Tring, England: The home of Mrs. Humphry Ward and her daughter, Dorothy, in Albury, Hertfordshire, England.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109. 




Sarah Wyman Whitman to SOJ

August, 1900.

     I found my escape in going straight to the Cathedral of Chartres* yesterday morning. . . . For as I sojourned there from the morning early, till long after sunset, I was able to know something of the Symphony of colour which is daily played there, and anything more matchless cannot be, in this world.


Notes

Cathedral of Chartres: The cathedral church of Notre Dame in Chartres in north central France is known especially for its stained-glass windows. Whitman refers to visits to Chartres in several of her other letters in the Riverside collection.

This transcription appears in Letters, Sarah Wyman Whitman.  Cambridge, MA:  Riverside Press, 1907, "Letters to Sarah Orne Jewett: 1882-1903," pp. 61-109.



Charles Dudley Warner to SOJ
[ Summer 1900 ]

     Warner's faith in literature led him to be a prop and inciter to young authors. Where he could discern real talent and character he was ready to become a mainstay. Only those shivering upon the edge of a plunge into the sea of literary life can know what a help he was and what happiness his hope in behalf of others gave. His advice was born out of wide experience. There is a record of one of the many cases of his helpfulness, where he writes to Sarah Orne Jewett, who had confided to him the actual beginning of a story which he had first suggested and she had long been planning, "The Tory Lover"; "I am not in the least alarmed about the story, now that you are committed to it by the printing of the beginning, only this, that if you let the fire slow down to rest for a week or so, please do not take up any other work, but rest really. Do not let any other theme come in to distract your silent mulling over the story. Keep your frame of mind in it. The stopping to do any little thing will distract you. Hold the story always in solution in your mind ready to be precipitated when your strength permits. That is to say, even if your fires are banked up, keep the story fused in your mind." He wrote also to the same friend: "The Pointed Firs in your note perfumed the house as soon as the letter was opened, and were quite as grateful to me as your kind approval . . .  . We are greatly rejoiced to know that you are getting better. I quite agree with you that being sick is fun compared to getting well. I want to see you ever so much and talk to you about your novel, and explain to you a little what I tried to do with Evelyn* in my own. It seems to me possible to educate a child with good literature as well as bad; at least I tried the experiment.     Most affectionately yours."

From Mrs. James T. Fields, Charles Dudley Warner, 1904

Notes

Summer 1900:  While Warner could not have read a publication of The Tory Lover until it began appearing as an Atlantic Monthly serial in November 1900, Jewett writes to Horace E. Scudder on July 12, 1901, that Warner had read some of her early chapters in the the previous summer.  Therefore, Warner's comments on the novel seem likely to have been written during the summer of 1900.

Evelyn:  Evelyn is a young woman in Warner's novel, That Fortune (1899).  This information indicates that the earliest composition date for the second quotation would be 1899.

Edited and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett
 

Wednesday morning
[ Late summer 1900 ]*


Dear Mary

It is before breakfast and Mr. Stubby* is splashing at his bath.  I don't know what high enterprise may be on foot to judge by this early start.  Yesterday afternoon he went down to Hamilton House* and returned at supper time with great tales.  Elise* had just come in the afternoon train and Mrs. Varney* was calling and they were all in the garden, and one of Isaac's children* appeared with a mangled chicken just after they had gone into the house and C. V. * had gone.  The chicken's drumstick, as Theodore naturally expressed it had been hurt (they have had more skunks and Isaac had actually shot one! ) and they got the “Rebecca box”* of remedies and Theodore sewed up the wound.  Emily* didn't know what she should have done, and the chicken ate oat meal biscuit and water at once and when water gave out they tried it with ginger ale on the crackers.  I wish you had heard the gleeful account.

I think the surgeon might have still been in attendance but he had to return for fear of rain as the other house windows were open and he had the keys, and when I went out in the afternoon I saw the funniest string of things airing on the clothes-line from the skins of coons to his red blankets.  One of Katy's* washes was tame enough in comparison.  He said that Mrs. Tyson was feeling quite rested and very well.  Elise had been at the house in town and said that 'the man' had finished and was tearing up cheese cloth to cover the things, etc.  Harry Thompson* solaced the evening for our nephew.  I heard him departing in a great shower of rain just after ten.  His wife and [sons?] are down at the farm in York.  Thiddy said in a funny tone that he wasn't changed a bit.  I heard his own voice steady at the game of making a good visit but whether it seemed a little long on a warm evening -- I think not on the whole!!  Katy says tell her everything is all right and going splendid.  I haven't seen Mrs. Dodge* yet but she may be having her breakfast.  Mrs. Pairkins* brought 2 chickens and isn't coming again this week for which the Lord may well be thanked.  I got out to the garden yesterday and it was almost lovelier than ever.  I missed you and wished for Aunts to sit wuth [with?] us.  Perhaps they could drive over again before frost.  This is no day for a drive, it behaves as it if were going to be southerly and warm.  I send you dear old Katharine's niece-es??*  I would so like to see her!  A. F.* said that Brother Robert* came at 11:45 and she had J. D. and Miss Grace Howe* to dine with him, and they sat out in the lovely evening and Katharine and Wells* came riding up the hill on horseback and it was very pretty.  Love to all

                                                               S.

Were you in Dan's stables at Exeter?*  to see the pattern of his wagon?


Notes

1900:  Though the letter is brimming with information that could narrow its composition date still more, it is not yet sufficient to be very specific.  It almost certainly is after the date when Katy Galvin first came to work for the Jewetts in early 1899 and probably after the Tysons began spending summers at Hamilton House in South Berwick in 1900 and while Theodore Eastman, who was a Harvard undergraduate in 1897-1901, was still summering at home. I have placed it tentatively in 1900.

Mr. Stubby
:  Theodore Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.  In this letter he is referred to as Thiddy, Theodore, and "our nephew."

Hamilton House:  The 18th-century house built by Jonathan Hamilton in South Berwick.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents.

Elise:  Elizabeth Russell Tyson.  See Emily Davis Tyson in Correspondents.

Mrs. Varney: This may be Carrie (Mrs. Charles) Varney (d. 1910) of South Berwick.  See Pirsig, The Placenames of South Berwick, p. 22.  Further information is welcome.

Isaac's children:  In The Placenames of South Berwick, Wendy Pirsig says that Isaac J. Gilliland (d. 1945) and his wife Annie, after immigrating from Ireland, entered the employ of Emily Tyson and then her daughter, Elise, helping to maintain the Hamilton House property.  Isaac was a teamster, and Annie was a cook (pp. 58-9).

C. V. :  Carrie Varney? See above.

“Rebecca box”:  This may refer to Rebecca Young (1847-1927).  See Correspondents.

Emily:  Emily Davis Tyson.  See Correspondents.

Katy:  Katherine Galvin.  See Correspondents.

Harry Thompson:  Theodore's married friend has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Mrs. Dodge:  Probably Mary Mapes Dodge is visiting South Berwick. See Correspondents.

Mrs. Pairkins:  Jewett probably is rendering Katy's pronunciation of "Perkins."  However, the identity of this local supplier of chickens is unknown.  Assistance is welcome.

Katharine's niece-es: The identities of Katharine and her nieces are uncertain.  Jewett seems to be including a letter from them.  As she does not differentiate this Katharine from the guest of Annie Fields she mentions later in the letter, it is possible she refers to Katharine Wormeley, who had a married sister living in the Baltimore, MD.   Mary Elizabeth Wormeley Latimer (1822-1904) had at least two children, Caroline (1859-1933) and Ralph (1862-1903).  This would be just one niece, however. while the letter seems to imply there are two.   There was another Wormeley sister, Ariana Randolph Wormeley Curtis (1834-1922), living in Venice, Italy, who had two sons Ralph Wormeley and Osborne Sargent.  These sons both married and between them had three daughters, Katharine's grand-nieces.  See The Harvard Graduates' Magazine, Volume 17 (1908), pp. 319-20.
    While this information is tantalizing, it does not satisfactorily identify Katharine or her nieces.   Assistance is welcome.

A. F. ... Brother Robert: Annie Adams Fields and Dr. Robert Collyer.  See Correspondents.

J. D. and Miss Grace Howe:   The identity of J.D. is not yet known. Though Jewett corresponded with Julia Dorr ( See Correspondents), she typically called her "Mrs. Dorr." Assistance is welcome.
    Grace Howe (b. 1879) was the daughter of the Philadelphia businessman and physician, Dr. Herbert Marshall Howe (1844-1916) and Mary Wilson Fell (b. 1848), and the grand-daughter of Mark Antony DeWolfe and Elizabeth (Marshall) Howe, his second wife.  Mark Antony DeWolfe Howe (1808-1895) was the first Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Central Pennsylvania.  By his third wife, Eliza Whitney (1826-1909), Howe was the father of Mark Antony DeWolfe Howe (1864-1960), thus half brother of Herbert, who became the editor of Annie Fields's diaries in Memories of a Hostess and who assisted Fields in editing Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett

Katharine and Wells: One of Fields's guests may have been Katherine Prescott Wormeley, whose first name often was spelled "Katharine." See Correspondents.  In a letter of 20 October 1908 to David Douglas, Jewett describes Katharine Wormeley as "one of my dearest older friends."
    The other guest may have been Ida B. Wells (1862 - 1931), "an African-American journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, sociologist, feminist, ...and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909."  However, there is as yet no supporting evidence for this speculation.

Dan's stables at Exeter:  This business has not yet been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Annie Adams Fields to Mary Rice Jewett

Saturday
[ Summer  1900 ]*

Dear Mary:

    Your beautiful bounty reached us in perfect condition last evening.  We had just been talking of our pleasure in having you here when the [ unrecognized word peonies ?] came in the gloaming.

[ Page 2 ]

We parted with our dear brother Robert* under the glorious light and shadow of the Shaw Memorial --.*  He was not in a mood to say goodbye so we parted as easily as we could but we hated to see him go --

    It is a wonder that the flowers came through the intense heat in such perfect freshness.

    Goodbye dear -- love to Theodore.*  I think his "rush" did something.

Yours
A. F.


Notes

Summer  1900: This date is speculative, based primarily upon the reference to Robert Collyer.  Another letter, probably from Late Summer 1900, reports to Mary Rice Jewett that Brother Robert Collyer has visited Annie Fields.

brother Robert
:  Robert Collyer. See Correspondents.

Shaw Memorial:  The Robert Gould Shaw Memorial by Augustus Saint-Gaudens on the Boston Common commemorates Shaw's leading a "colored" Union regiment in the Civil War.

Theodore:  Theodore Jewett Eastman. See Correspondents
    At this time, Eastman was an undergraduate at Harvard University.  The cryptic reference to his "rush" may connect with a college activity.

The manuscript of this letter is held by Historic New England in Letters from Annie Fields to Mary Rice Jewett, Jewett Family Papers: MS014.01.04.  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller. Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

            Saturday morning [4 August, 1900]


Dear Annie

            I do think your letters are dearer and nicer every day --- and oh, they do make me wish to see you so!  I hope that you did not come back too tired from town yesterday, and I am so glad that there is no more going there for the present.  Twice a week was a [poor partially underlined?] Fuffy!* and yesterday afternoon grew too hot here though the morning was cool and beautiful.  I am up earlier than common

[ Page 2 ]

this morning, for there is a great expedition now on the road to Knight's Pond* after pond [lilies by ?] Elise and Theodore.*  Elise came up to pass the night to go, or rather to make an early start -- so ^they have started^ after a good breakfast and with a provision of two bananas each in hand.  I drove down to H. house* yesterday morning with Stubby and we felt that the green fields were never [lovelier corrected].  Elise had gone down to the Coolidges in the boat with Templeman* to spend the night -- something is the matter with the boat which he had had built.  Mrs. Tyson has set up a Saturday morning reading for the Country!*  At which Mary & Mrs. Goodwin are much pleased,* and I join in with alacrity, and we are going down presently.  All this is good and pleasant.

    How delightful about Madame d'Arcos!*  (Fuff wrote her so charming!) and Jessies* letter is encouraging though I dont doubt that it

[ Page 3 ]


will be later than the 12th --  When she comes here for her little visit I should rather it would be in September -- but we needn't dwell upon that now .

------ Stubby is going off on Monday I am sorry to say though he will have a very nice time on a boat cruising with a boy.  He is looking forward to his visit to you next month I find, and perhaps you can think of a week that would be better than another, or I may say, more convenient.  Oh, the hollyhocks are so lovely in the garden!  I do wish you were here !!!  It seemed to me that I

[ Page 4 ]

must
beg you to come and spend Sunday, and then I remembered your Baron ---- and the Board meeting but oh, to see Fuff!  I keep on feeling very well and ready to do things, so far.  How delightful about young Boylston* -- I always liked and believed in that dear boy.  There are so many things to say but I must get my letter to the post office now{.}  With dearest love always  P. L.*



Notes

4 August 1900:  As the notes below suggest, 1899 is about the earliest possible date for this letter, for this is the date at which the Tysons began summering at Hamilton House in South Berwick.  However, when one considers that Jessie Cochrane is expected on August 12, that this letter is composed on Saturday and that another letter mentioning Theodore's cruise was composed on the following Monday, the 1900 calendar fits better.  This does not, however, make other years at about this time impossible.

Fuffy
:  Jewett's nickname for Annie Fields.

Knight's Pond:  In The Placenames of South Berwick, Wendy Pirsig gives the history of this pond in the South Berwick area, which was a major local source of commercial ice well into the 19th century (pp. 223-4).

Elise:  Daughter of Emily Tyson.  See Correspondents.

Theodore:  Jewett's nephew, Theodore Jewett Eastman, nicknamed Stubby.  See Correspondents.

H. house:  Hamilton House in South Berwick, ME; purchased in 1898 by Emily Tyson.

Coolidges in the boat with Templeman:  John Templeman Coolidge (1856-1945) and his first wife, Katherine Scollay Parkman (1858-1900), daughter of historian Francis Parkman, summered in Portsmouth, NH, at the historic Wentworth Mansion, which they restored and maintained over many years, beginning in 1886. Wikipedia says: "Coolidge was a Boston Brahmin, artist and antiquarian who used the property as a summer home. His guests included such luminaries as John Singer Sargent, Edmund C. Tarbell and Isabella Stewart Gardner." See also How the Coolidge Family of Boston Saved Wentworth Mansion by J. Dennis Robinson.

Mrs. Tyson:  Emily Tyson.  See Correspondents.

Saturday morning reading for the Country:  Information about this seemingly public reading from Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896) would be welcome.

Mary & Mrs. Goodwin:  Mary Rice Jewett and, probably, Sophia Elizabeth Hayes Goodwin.  See Correspondents.

Madame d'Arcos:  This seems to refer to Christine Vaughan de Arcos (1835-1913), who was life-long friend (and often described as lady-in-waiting) to Empress Eugénie de Montijo of France (1826-1920).  See The Empress Eugénie and Her Son (1916) by Edward Legge (Chapter 3).  Why Fields and Jewett are corresponding about her is not known.  Assistance is welcome.

Jessie's letter:  Probably referring to Jessie Cochrane, a frequent guest of Annie Fields.  See Correspondents.

Baron:  This reference remains mysterious.

Board meeting:  Annie Fields, for many years, served on the board of the Associated Charities of Boston.  This probably is the board Jewett refers to.

young Boylston: In SOJ to Annie Adams Fields,  Monday Morning [July 1899], Jewett notes that Annie Adams Fields's nephew, Boylston Adams III plans to stay with her at Charles St. as he begins his medical studies at Harvard.

P. L
.:  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

                Monday Morning [6 August 1900]*

Dearest Annie

    Here we are in the dog days again, but with clear bright weather of last week to look back to.  Stubby* is setting forth for Marblehead* with a boy [cruising ?].  The boy has a good skipper (or rather the boat has!) so that all is well.  He is going to "Russells"* the last week in August, so I encouraged him that if nothing happened you would kindly let him come

[ Page 2]

the week before that ^or the third week^ -- when I shall be there of course & Mary* at Little Boars Head -- It make complication, but a dear one, trying to make that young man's plans fit in with ours.  He seems to be dreadful lonesome if he is at home and we are both away -----  You never saw anything so pretty as the return of the two young people -- Theodore & Elise* from a long morning [spent corrected] in search of flowers; they had the wagon

[ Page 3]

crammed full -- quantities of pond lilies which were the chief object but also "lop-lilies" great blue pickerel weeds -- nine large sods of pitcher plants out of a quaking bog* and nobody knows what else!  Elise gave a happy sigh and said, "Oh this is what I call a good time!"  They were so funny and happy and dirty and had encountered pleasing adventures of many sorts.

    Yesterday I didn't go to church but read and kept [quiet ?].  It was not a very good day but

[ Page 4]

I really keep on feeling quite mended up.  I have to tell a dear Fuff* so in every letter.  How are you darling Fuff, and did the great luncheon party go off charmingly.  I'm sure it did.  A Duke and Duchess and a Baron* were a splendid sight.  Mrs. Cabot has begun to write about my coming.  I suggested Tuesday next, but she clung to Monday -- well; it makes no difference{.} I suppose we shall have Sunday together you and I and then I shall go back to you..  I have been interrupted all the way in this letter.  The last

[a letter or number in a circle, in another hand, bottom left corner of page 3]

[ Up the left margin of page 1]

was a man about the breakfast room clock ....  Goodbye with best love from your Pinny*

Notes

6 August 1900:  This date is inferred from the probable date of SOJ to Annie Adams Fields, Saturday morning [4 August, 1900]

Stubby ... Marblehead
:  Stubby is Theodore Jewett Eastman.  See Correspondents.  Jewett announced in SOJ to Annie Adams Fields, Saturday morning [before 12 August, 1899] that Theodore would begin a cruise the following Monday.  This would seem to be the beginning day of that cruise.  Marblehead, MA on the coast between Boston and Manchester by the Sea.

"Russells":  This destination has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

Mary ... Little Boars Head:  Mary Rice Jewett. See Correspondents. Richard Cary characterizes Little Boar's Head: "A showplace of southeastern New Hampshire about half a mile from Rye, where Miss Jewett's maternal aunts had a summer home."

Elise:  Daughter of Emily Tyson.  See Correspondents.

pond lilies .. "lop-lilies" ... blue pickerel weeds -- pitcher plants ... quaking bog:  Pond lilies (Nuphar) are usually called common water lilies in North America. 
    What Jewett means by "lop-lilies" has not been determined.  Perhaps she means this as a local name for Pickerelweed?
    Pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata) is a purple blooming aquatic plant.
    "Pitcher plants are several different carnivorous plants which have modified leaves known as pitfall traps—a prey-trapping mechanism featuring a deep cavity filled with digestive fluid liquid. ...  The North American genus Sarracenia are the trumpet pitchers."  Wikipedia.
    "A quaking bog ... is a form of bog occurring in wetter parts of valley bogs and raised bogs, and sometimes around the edges of acidic lakes. The bog vegetation, mostly sphagnum moss anchored by sedges ... forms a mat approximately half a metre thick, floating over water or very wet peat. White spruces are also common .... Walking on the surface causes it to move -- larger movements may cause visible ripples on the surface, or they may even make trees sway. In the absence of disturbance from waves, the bog mat may eventually cover entire bays, or even entire small lakes."  Wikipedia.

Fuff:  One of Annie Fields' nicknames.  Her summer home in Manchester, MA, stands on Thunderbolt Hill.

A Duke and Duchess and a Baron:  Thomas Bailey Adlrich and his wife, Lilian, were nicknamed the Duke and Duchess of Ponkapog.  It is likely Jewett refers to them, but the identify of the Baron remains unknown.

Mrs. Cabot:  Susan Burley Cabot.  See Correspondents.

PinnyP.L. or  Pinny Lawson, one of Jewett's nicknames.

The manuscript of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.  Jewett, Sarah Orne, 1849-1909. 40 letters to Annie (Adams) Fields (no date). Sarah Orne Jewett additional correspondence, 1868-1930. MS Am 1743.1 (117).  Transcribed and annotated by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Wednesday night
[September 6, 1900]*


[Begin letterhead]

Pride's Crossing.

[Eng letterhead]

Dear Mary 

            I shall send such a short letter that it isn't worth sending! -- but you will like to have the news of my arrival and finding Mrs. Cabot pretty well.* We have had a great evening, all the candles in the parlor but one were promptly snuffed right out after supper and we were arranged convenient for hearing in our chairs and set in!! It is now ten --
      I went to Boston with Mrs. Fields* by the 1:40 & we came back on the 4,30{.} My foot is really all well and I went to the corner bookstore to do an errand and that was about all.* The hour and a half went by quickly. I think we were pretty late getting to Town, but I don’t know why: we seemed to speed right allong but it was ten minutes of three when we got there I believe.

             I am glad you like the story -- the first stretch is a little heavy yet, but it has to tell certain things and get them done with. There are no more long pulls of history like that --  Dicky Dana was reported to have returned and the girls were going over there to supper tonight.* So I suppose they will have a nice time --  Mrs. Cabot is going to ask them & A. F. here to lunch on Friday --  A. F. was saying about you today, how dear and sweet you were, and perhaps you would come again so as to go to Judy's -- but I told her I didn't believe we should get there this year.*

Good night with best love from Sarah --

How dear of Mrs. Tyson to come and to bring the flowers.*


Notes

September 6, 1900:  With this letter is an envelope addressed to Mary R. Jewett in South Berwick, dated from Pride’s Crossing, Mass., September 6, 1900.  The reference to Jewett’s work on The Tory Lover confirms this date.  However, the letter was written on Wednesday September 5, in the evening, and mailed the next day.

Mrs. Cabot: Susan Burley Cabot (1822-1907), wife of a former mayor of Salem, at whose home Miss Jewett spent part of the winter each year. Though separated in age by over a quarter-century, the two women enjoyed a mutually stimulating friendship. Miss Jewett dedicated The Queen's Twin and Other Stories "To Susan Burley Cabot."  (Richard Cary)

Mrs. Fields ... A. F.:  Annie Adams Fields.  See Correspondents.

corner bookstore:   In Literary Shrines: the Haunts of some Famous American Authors (1895), Theodore Frelinghuysen Wolfe writes:

Prominent among the literary landmarks is the "Corner Book-store"  ... at School and Washington Streets [in Boston], which, like Murray's in London, has long been the rendezvous of the littérateurs. Here appeared the first American edition of "The Opium Eater" and of Tennyson's poems. Here was the early home of the "Atlantic," then edited by James T. Fields, who was the literary partner of the firm and the presiding genius of the old store. (87)

like the story:  Given the description of the story as containing a good deal of history, almost certainly Jewett refers to The Tory Lover, which began appearing in serial in November 1900.

Dicky DanaWikipedia says: Richard Henry Dana III (January 3, 1851 – December 16, 1931) was an American lawyer and civil service reformer... [H]e married in 1878, Edith Longfellow (1853–1915), the daughter of poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. They had four sons, Richard Henry Dana IV and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana, Edmund Trowbridge Dana III, and another."  His father was  "Richard Henry Dana Jr. (August 1, 1815 – January 6, 1882), an American lawyer and politician from Massachusetts, a descendant of an eminent colonial family, who gained renown as the author of the American classic, the memoir Two Years Before the Mast. Both as a writer and as a lawyer, he was a champion of the downtrodden, from seamen to fugitive slaves and freedmen."

Judy:  While this has not been confirmed, it seems likely that this is Judith Drew Beal, stepdaughter of Annie Fields's sister, Louisa Adams Beal.  See Annie Fields in Correspondents.

Mrs. Tyson:  Emily Davis Tyson (c.1846-1922) was the second wife George Tyson (1831-1881), a successful businessman.  His early death left her with three young step-children and a large fortune.  She had two homes, summering at Pride's Crossing, north of Boston, and wintering in Boston.  With encouragement from Jewett, she and her step-daughter, Elizabeth (Elise) purchased the 18th-century Hamilton House in South Berwick in 1898 and undertook a restoration project. 
    See So Fine a Prospect: Historic New England Gardens (1997) by Alan Emmet. 
    Photograph of Jewett and Tyson taken by Elise.

The manuscript of this letter is at the University of New England,  Maine Women Writers Collection,  Jewett Collection  correspondence   corr092-soj-mj.28.  Transcription and notes by Terry & Linda Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[September 9, 1900]*

Sunday night

  [Begin letterhead]

Pride's Crossing

[End letterhead]

Dear Mary 

            The chapters and their copy arrived in good season and I immediately made up my mind to shorten the first one a good piece. It appears like a young minister's first sermon with a little about everything into it. But I expected to have to deal with it considerably. ------ 

            I am so sorry that Mrs. Tyson isn't well.* I tried to call upon her yesterday, but without avail. 

            -- Mrs. Dexter came this afternoon while I was out* -- and I was sorry to miss her, but great particulars were afforded of affairs along the shore which were distinctly and severally imparted again to me when I came back. I went down to carry some things to be done up and then A. F. and I went over to the Howe's. Miss Katy Nicholas has gone and Helen Howe has come back. Mrs. Gardner came while we were there and we were all very cheerful but I thought it was a poor day with both Mr. Howe and Alice. It was a most lovely afternoon with little very white sail-boats on a light grey sea. Mr. Johnson Morton* was spending Sunday on the hill and A. F. had indulged the little girls in having a crony come down from Cambridge. I do so enjoy a Sunday when I am so busy all the week and now I shall be as fresh as can be again to-morrow in this cool weather. Miss Tarbell ^editor^ of McClure's is coming to luncheon to-morrow ^at A. F.'s ^ and I shall go down to see her -- Miss Downes isn't coming back until Thursday Mary, so I am afraid I shall be away when Eva* comes!!!!

             Goodnight with much love to you and Stubby from a sister. I long to see the things from Desbarets. 

Sarah

I have just written to Grace for her birthday. I hope she will get it tomorrow afternoon{.}

Notes September 9, 1900: That this letter is from Pride’s Crossing and also refers to The Tory Lover suggests that its date is near, but probably after,  the September 6, 1900 letter from Sarah to Mary.  That she probably has sent Grace Gordon Walden a birthday note (see below) places the letter close to September 10.  September 9, 1890 is the closest Sunday to Walden's birthday, but it is possible this letter was written the following Sunday, September 16.

Mrs. Tyson:  Emily Tyson.  See Correspondents.

Mrs. Dexter ... A. F. ...  the Howe's .... Miss Katy Nicholas has gone and Helen Howe .... Mrs. Gardner ... Mr. Howe and Alice ... Mr. Johnson Morton:  Mrs. Dexter probably is Mrs. Fred Dexter, an acquaintance of Emily Tyson mentioned in other letters.  No further information about her has been discovered.  Assistance is welcome.
    A. F. is Annie Adams Fields
    The Howe's, George Dudley and Alice Greenwood Howe.  Back Bay Houses notes: "By the 1904-1905 winter season, 59 Commonwealth was the home of Mrs. Alice (Greenwood) Howe, the widow of George Dudley Howe. Her husband had died in March of 1903; prior to his death, they had lived at 179 Commonwealth. Alice Howe was a close friend of the author, Sarah Orne Jewett, who dedicated her book, The Country of the Pointed Firs, to her.  Alice Howe also maintained a summer home in Manchester, the Cliffs, built in 1878, the first residence designed by architect Arthur Little. Mrs. Howe continued to live at 59 Commonwealth in 1913, but had moved to 265 Commonwealth by 1914."
    It is possible that Jewett also refers as well to Mark Antony De Wolfe Howe (1864 - 1960) and his wife Fanny Huntington Quincy (1870–1933).
    It is not clear, though, who Helen Howe is.  Mark Antony and Fanny's daughter, Helen Huntington Howe (1905-1975), the monologuist and novelist who married Reginald Allen, was not yet born in 1900.
  Likewise, Miss Katy Nicholas has not been identified.  Assistance is welcome.

    Mrs. Gardner is very likely Isabella Stewart Gardner (April 14, 1840 – July 17, 1924), "the founder of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, ... a leading American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts." Wikipedia.
    Johnson Morton (c. 1862-1922) was an author and editor, from the Harvard class of 1886.  He served as editor of the Youth's Companion (1893-1907).

the hill:  Fields's Manchester home was located on Thunderbolt Hill.

Miss Tarbell ... of McClure's:  According to Wikipedia, "Ida Minerva Tarbell (November 5, 1857 - January 6, 1944) was an American teacher, author and journalist. She was one of the leading "muckrakers" of the progressive era of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and is thought to have pioneered investigative journalism. She is best known for her 1904 book, The History of the Standard Oil Company .... It was first serialized in McClure's Magazine from 1902 to 1904. She was an editor at McClures for many years.

Miss Downes ,,, I am afraid I shall be away when Eva comes:  Miss Downes and Eva have not been identified.  She may be Baroness Eva von Blomberg.   See Correspondents.  Assistance is welcome.

the things from Desbarets:    This reference remains obscure.  Assistance is welcome.

Grace for her birthday:  Jewett likely refers to a friend from her youth, Grace Gordon, who became the second wife the Protestant Episcopal clergyman Jacob Treadwell Walden (1830-1918) in 1885. Her birthday of 10 September fits the probable date of the letter.  The following biographical sketch of Walden appears in the blog, Cow New Hampshire:

(Jacob) Treadwell Walden, son of Jacob Treadwell & Beulah Hoffman (Willet) Walden, Episcopal clergyman, among the leading pulpit orators of the Episcopal Church in America, author of Sunday-School Prayer Book; Our English Bible and Its Ancestors, and the Great Meaning of Metanoia; b. 25 April 1830 Walden, Orange Co., NY, and died 21 May 1918 in Boston MA; he m. 15/17 September 1858 at Christ Church in Norwich CT to Elizabeth Leighton Law, dau of Hon. Wm. Henry & Mary (Lee) Law (they were married by Rev. A. Lee of Delaware). She was born Norwich Conn. 7 Nov 1829. [Mary Lee, b. 15 Dec 1805 Cambridge MA, d. 26 Oct 1839 Huntington PA, m. 17 Feb 1829 William Henry Law, son of Lyman and Elizabeth (Learned) Law. Her brother Bishop Lee, was Episcopal Bishop of Delaware]. Treadwell married 2nd,  11 June 1885 in Boston MA to Grace Gordon, daughter of George W. & Kate/Katherine P. (Sleeper) Gordon.  She was born 10 Sep 1842 in Boston MA, and died 1 April 1918 in Boston MA.  Rev. Treadwell Walden was early an assistant at Trinity Church, Newark NJ.  He then became Rector of an Episcopal Church at Norwich Conn, living there for several years, until 1863, leaving to take charge of St. Clement’s Church in Philadelphia. He remained here until 1869; St. Pauls Church, Indianapolis from 1869-1872, and afterwards was Rector of a church at Fishkill and also in of St. Paul’s Cathedral in Boston until 1877. Later living at Cambridge, Mass, employing himself mostly in literary work of a theological nature. In 1890 residing 11 Lambert Avenue in Boston MA. 1898 Protestant Church Directory shows Treadwell Walden, became deacon 1854, born Walden NY, residing in Portsmouth NH. In May 1898 Rev. Treadwell Walden gave a lecture on “William the Conqueror” at St. John’s Chapel on State Street in Portsmouth NH.

While it is possible Jewett refers to Grace Norton, another friend, her birthday falls in April rather than September.  Grace Norton (7 April 1834 - 5 May 1926), who "was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the daughter of Andrew Norton and Catherine Eliot Norton, and the sister of American author and Harvard professor, Charles Eliot Norton. She was privately educated in Cambridge, and developed a great love for the literature of France, especially that of the French essayist, Montaigne. Norton became a Montaigne expert, translating, writing, and lecturing on his works, as well as those of other French authors. Many of her articles appeared in World Literature, Nation, and other publications."  Harvard University Library.

The manuscript of this letter is at the University of New England,  Maine Women Writers Collection,  Jewett Collection  correspondence  corr092-soj-mj.23.  Transcription and notes by Terry & Linda Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

Manchester

Monday
  [ Oct 13, 1900 ]*

Dear Mary

I had Mrs. True Goodwin* for companion to Boston and Mr. T. G. came to bring her to the train so that I had a good chance to talk about Mrs. Dexter.*  They both took it very reasonably and he thanked me for trying to do something about it in such a nice way.  I thought they seemed much more cheerful and contented than last summer.


Notes

A transcriber's note with this letter reads: [Manchester, Mass., Oct. 13 to MRJ, SB]

1900:  The earliest mention of Mrs. Dexter in Jewett letters appears to be in 1900, the latest in 1907.  I have tentatively placed this letter in the summer of 1900.

True Goodwin:   In Pirsig's The Placenames of South Berwick is a photograph of True E. Goodwin (1850-1918) and his family at Hamilton House (p. 38).  Other sources indicate that he served at various times as a South Berwick selectman and as supervisor of schools.  He married Clara Jane Garland (b. 1856) on 25 May 1896.

Mrs. Dexter:  This could be the Mrs. Fred Dexter mentioned in other letters as an acquaintance of Emily Tyson, but this is not certain and this person has not been identified.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett

[Thurs. a.m. early October 1900]


I had a great blow yesterday as I waited at the postoffice in seeing that the town woods by the Great Works river were going to be cut.*  It would spoil one of our loveliest places and that little view down over the slope it seems ever since as if I could hardly bear it.  I wish you would ask about it:  how much there is etc. just for satisfaction:  Jimmy* would know.  Please dont forget it and tell me.

Mary sends love to you and all affectionate messages, and I hope to see you SOON!  Oh it will be so nice to get home.  I dont want to stay a bit longer!


Notes

Thurs. a.m. October 1900:  Jewett's letter to Mary Rice Jewett of 15 October 1900 seems to respond to what Mary had to say about the price of the town woods mentioned in this letter.  Handwritten notes with this text read: [to Mary] [Thus. a.m.].

the town woods by the Great Works river were going to be cut:  See SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett of 15 October 1900.

Jimmy:  This person's identity is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

Mary:  Which Mary this may be from among Jewett's acquaintance is not yet known.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Mary Rice Jewett
 

MANCHESTER-BY-THE-SEA
Monday
[ Oct. 15, 1900 ]*



Dear Mary

                   …………..I thank you for telling me about the woods.*  I thought it might be a smaller sum than that  --  so hope it is over!  It ought to make us sorry.  We hardly know how much our love for Berwick rests upon such things, and that we can lose the things that make it really beautiful.

 
Notes

1900:  A transcriber's note with this text reads:  [Oct. 15, 1900  SOJ to MRJ  ?omus Merriman,  Stonehurst.]  No rationale for this date is given, but this note suggests there was an envelope with this letter.  Stonehurst in North Conway, NH was the home of Jewett's friend, Helen Bigelow Merriman.  See Correspondents.
    The line of points presumably indicates an omission from the manuscript.

the woods:  What issue concerning woods has been settled is not yet known.  Assistance is welcome.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Undated Letters, Folder 75, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection. Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Augustus Buell to SOJ

October 27, 1900 *
1913 Judson Place.
Philadelphia.

My dear Miss Jewett:

     I have just read the beginning of your story in the November Atlantic.*  It bids fair to prove of surpassing interest.

     In your letter you say that I make Dr. Green hail from Philadelphia. If you take another glance at the roster of the Ranger you will see that he hails from Portsmouth*

     I have seen the pamphlet -- or one pamphlet -- by Dr. Benjamin Green. It dealt, however, entirely with the history of the Ranger from after her return from France in the fall of 1778. Henry Gardner in his narrative speaks of the Dr. Ezra Green in the Ranger's European cruise as "Nelson."

     Your introduction of "Roger Wallingford" to your readers is finely dramatic, and it would be a pity to spoil such a charming -- nay even thrilling -- romance, for the sake of commonplace history. As a matter of fact I am sure that Wallingford had made one cruise in the West Indies, with Nicholas Biddle during the winter 1775-76 and that Jones had with him in the Providence during the summer of 1776 a man named Richard Wallingford, hailing from Philadelphia -- at that time anyhow -- whatever may have been his proper port of hail.

     The records I have are, of course, meager, but there is nothing in any of the extant records of his shipmates or contemporaries -- so far as I have had opportunity of seeing them -- to indicate the Wallingford of the Ranger was a Tory at heart.

     He may have been inclined that way in the fall of 1775, and such a dramatic incident as you portray may have occurred then. But from any records that are extant the conclusion must be drawn that the man whose name has been officially handed down to us as "Richard Wallingford" junior lieutenant of the Ranger, had already seen at least a year and a half of good service in our infant navy when he sailed from Portsmouth with Paul Jones on what proved to be his last cruise. I could not get access to all my references on this score without going to the National Library at Washington. But to the best of my recollection, Wallingford's first appearance in the Continental Navy was in the fall of 1775, as a volunteer in a small ship commanded by Captain Abraham Whipple, sailing from either Portsmouth or Newburyport, that early in 1776 -- say the end of January -- having put into the Delaware, he was transferred to the Andrea Doria, under Nicholas Biddle; from which ship he went to the Alfred when the squadron returned to Newport in the Spring; and thence, with others, from that ship to the Providence when the Alfred's crew was broken up. The only alternative theory is that there were two Wallingfords -- though there is no doubt that the Ranger's Wallingford of history came from the region of Portsmouth, N.H.

Very truly,

Augustus C. Buell


Notes

This letter was written on letterhead, so the address is printed, but the date and text are added.
    The occasion of Buell writing to Jewett is the publication, first in serial and then as a book, of The Tory Lover (1900-1901).  Buell's biography of John Paul Jones appeared while Jewett was composing and revising her novel, and she drew upon his work for facts incorporated into the novel.  Fortunately, she was somewhat restrained in her use of the biography, for subsequent scholarship, as indicated in Wikipedia, established that Buell fabricated much of the material in his book.
    As a result, factual information in his letters is unreliable.

November Atlantic:  Jewett's The Tory Lover (1901) began appearing as a serial in Atlantic Monthly in November 1900.

hails from Portsmouth:  According to Elizabeth Emerson Dorr, Dr. Green was in practice in Dover, NH, when the American revolution broke out.  See The Granite Monthly 38 (1906) pp. 107-14.  The accuracy of the information Buell provides about Wallingford has not been determined.  In a later letter below, Buell claims to find information verifying Wallingford's "Tory" sentiments.
 
The ms. of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: bMS Am 1743 (31); transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Mark Antony De Wolfe Howe

 

October 29th [1900]

South Berwick

 

No more Green Bonnets* for me or short sketches which are soon written.  I am still at work on the story which begins in the November Atlantic* and there is a long stretch of hard work ahead, before I can put it out of mind.  I feel just now as if I had all the cloth without having my coat made!  I have written most of the chapters, but everyone must be written at least once again and put into shape.

Your Affectionate friend

 
Notes

1900:  This letter was composed before the beginning of the serialization of Jewett's The Tory Lover, which actually began in January 1901.  Handwritten notes with this transcription read: To:  Mark A. DeWolfe Howe, 18 Louisburg Square, Boston. 

Green Bonnets: Jewett's "The Green Bonnet" appeared in April 1901.

November Atlantic:  Jewett's final novel, The Tory Lover, began in Atlantic Monthly in November 1900.

This text is from transcriptions from mixed repositories in the Maine Women Writer's Collection, University of New England, Letters from Sarah Orne Jewett, 1875-1890, Folder 74, Burton Trafton Jewett Research Collection. For more information about the individual transcription, contact the Maine Women Writers Collection.  Preparation by Linda Heller.  Notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Augustus Buell to SOJ

October 31, 1900.
1913 Judson Place.
Philadelphia.

My dear Miss Jewett:

     I have just received your most charming letter of the 29th. After writing my last letter to you it occurred to me that, in the earlier stages of research anent Paul Jones, I had made a cursory study of Wallingford and had prepared a summary thereof, to be used as a footnote. However, in casting the book, both limitations of space and tenor of the work secured to dictate its exclusion. The fact is that, having laid behind me Paul Jones and all his belongings after Scribners undertook to print it; and being currently absorbed in my daily avocation of "hardworking mechanic" at Cramp's Shipyard, I had temporarily forgotten this incident. But, on second thought, recalling the Wallingford affairs I made a new search of my "rejected mss." and at last found it. I find great pleasure in sending to you a typewritten copy of it. It at least traverses the statement of my former letter that there was no record of Toryism on Wallingford's part. I send it to you by way of the amende honorable,* and also to assure you that, in your pretty conception of a romantic theme, you have come nearer the truth of history than is common in that class of literature.

---

     My son, Ralph Polk Buell, who responded for me to your letter, asks me to offer you his most profound compliments. I must tell you about him. He will be 21 in time to vote next Tuesday.* He is, like me and like all his ancestors on both sides a Democrat; but of the faith of Jefferson and Jackson -- not of Bryan.

     Entering Princeton in 1896 (Class of 1900) at the age of 16, he graduated last June, "cum laude," fifth in a class of nearly 300. In April 1898 he took advantage of my absence in Russia on business for Cramp's Shipyard to run away from College and enlist for the Spanish war. He was in the fighting around Santiago and has the medal from that campaign. Returning to this country with his regiment in November 1898 he was mustered out and resumed his course at Princeton after the Thanksgiving Holiday in the Junior Class as if nothing had happened. He was one of two men in his regiment whose names did not appear on the "sick list" during their whole period of service.

     On my side he may I think be considered a worthy descendant of Henry [Eastman? Easdren?] of the Bon Homme Richard and Simon Buell of the Second New York Line (Van Courtland's Regiment.)

     On his mother's side -- whence he gets his middle name of Polk -- his chief ancestor was Colonel Thomas Polk of North Carolina, one of the signers of the [Mecklenburg?] Declaration in 1775. His great grandfather on the Polk side was Charles Polk, Major in command of a battalion of Coffee's Tennessee Riflemen under "Old Jack" at New Orleans. President Polk was his mother's great uncle as was also Colonel William Polk who commanded the Tennessee Regiment at [Contremos?], El Molino del Rey, [Chambusco?] and Chepultepec. His own grandfather on that side was Colonel John Walker Polk, a soldier in the Mexican war and for some time Chief of Staff to Generals Holmes, Kirby Smith and Richard Taylor in the Confederate Army. Colonel John Walker Polk was also one of the "Argonauts of '49;" going to California after the Mexican War.

     I might add that he gets his first name "Ralph" from his sixth ancestor; Ralphe -- or as it was usually spelled then -- "Rulf" Buell, born in Somersetshire, England, in 1616; a Trooper in [Justan's?] Regiment of Horse -- the Ironsides -- through the wars of English Liberation; one of the soldiers detailed to form the hollow square around the Block whence fell the head of Charles I; then, upon the Stuart Restoration, proscribed and a price set upon his head. Then taking refuge on these shores in the same ships that brought [Goffe?] the "Regicide Judge;" settling in what was their own "Far West" of Litchfield, Connecticut -- whence, since 1664 the history of the Buell race in the country may be easily traced.

     But all this, though interesting to me is tedious to you. If I have bored you about my boy -- my only child -- you may [you may stricken] I think, blame yourself for it, because of the flattering way in which you acknowledged the letter he wrote to you on [something stricken] my behalf. And by way of convincing you that I do not "idly dote on offspring not worthy those who gave him birth and name," etc I send to you by this mail under a separate cover his picture taken just after his Regiment -- the old Washington Light Infantry, officially known as the 1st District of Columbia Volunteers, had returned to Washington for muster out in November, 1898. You will see the Santiago Medal on his coat.

     As I have made this already too long, I might as well claim the privilege of an old man and get garrulous.

     I wish to mingle congratulations with you on what seems to be a renaissance of interest in our own Revolutionary history among the plain people. We seem to be at the beginning of one of those periods when men and women, surfeited with trash and [prurience?], turn longingly to the traditions of their heroic lore. I think the literary tastes of nations rise and fall as waves; and that just now we are nearing the crest of a great billow whose top will soon "comb over" in an almost bewildering spray of the classic grandeur and the white purity of that epoch which brought our nation forth -- our war for Independence. In such a literary epoch it will be seen that Paul Jones is to the Americans what Horatio Nelson is to the English -- the embodiment of their pride and the incarnation of their ambitions on the sea. I have contributed a little to this in history. You are helping it along in fiction -- or romance. It is a good work.

Yours,

Augustus C. Buell


Notes

This letter was written on letterhead, so the address is printed, but the date and text are added.  Jewett speaks of this letter in particular  the author of John Paul Jones (1900).  The accompanying "note" with this letter has not been located.  Assistance is welcome.
    Jewett and Buell exchanged a number of letters in late 1900 about The Tory Lover (1900-1901), then appearing in serial.  As the notes for Buell's first, October 27, 1900 letter to Jewett indicate, factual information in his letters is not to be trusted without independent verification.

amende honorableWikipeida says: "Amende honorable was originally a mode of punishment in France which required the offender, barefoot and stripped to his shirt, and led into a church or auditory with a torch in his hand and a rope round his neck held by the public executioner, to beg pardon on his knees of his God, his king, and his country; now used to denote a satisfactory apology or reparation."
    As notes for later letters, below, indicate, Buell almost certainly created his typewritten text rather than copying it from his research notes.

vote next TuesdayRalph Polk Buell (Dec. 21, 1878 - May 18, 1946) would have turned 21 in December 1899.  Except for changing his son's age (actually starting at Princeton when 17), the rest of the account is generally accurate, though not every detail has been verified.  Ralph was a Princeton graduate, completing a law degree in 1903, and a decorated veteran of the Spanish American War.
    None of the remaining information Buell provides about his and his wife's ancestors (Magdalen Tasker Polk (1858-1902) has been verified.
    In 1900, the United States general election took place on 6 November.  In the Presidential race, William McKinley defeated William Jennings Bryan.  Wikipedia.

Paul Jones ... Horatio NelsonWikipedia says: "John Paul Jones (born John Paul; July 6, 1747 - July 18, 1792) was a Scottish American sailor and the United States' first well-known naval fighter in the American Revolutionary War."
    "Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, 1st Duke of Bronté KB (29 September 1758 - 21 October 1805) was a British flag officer in the Royal Navy. He was noted for his inspirational leadership, superb grasp of strategy, and unconventional tactics, all of which resulted in a number of decisive naval victories, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars."

The ms. of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: bMS Am 1743 (31); transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Augustus Buell to SOJ

 

The Wm. Cramp & Sons Ship & Engine Building Co. *
Office, Beach and Ball Sts.
Philadelphia,
Nov. 1, 1900.

My dear Miss Jewett.

     In my letter of yesterday I forgot to note your references to "Mr. Warner." I suppose of course you mean Charles Dudley;* because people usually particularize by a first name when they wish to speak of any other Warner.

     My first meeting with him was at the [unreadable] house or "farm" of the late William Walter Phelps at [Meatogel?] Conn. The other guests present were General John Hawley, Sam Bowles (Old Sam), Jake [Brawley?] and Mark Twain.* It was in 1875. I never had such a time in my life. Mr. Phelps got out his hay wagon and drove us up to the top of Talcott's Mountain, where we lunched on a big rock overlooking the Connecticut valley.* You can imagine what an occasion it was. Mr. Warner knew the history of my famly in Connecticut better than I did. The next day we went to  [Simsbury?] where he showed me a tombstone which said that

"John Buell. Roy. Prov'l Regt. *
Aet. 22 yrs 1 mo.
1708."

     I afterwards met him in Washington several times.

Very truly

Augustus C. Buell.
 

Notes

This letter was written on letterhead, so the address is printed, but the date and text are added.
    Jewett and Buell exchanged a number of letters in late 1900 about The Tory Lover (1900-1901), then appearing in serial.  As the notes for Buell's first, October 27, 1900 letter to Jewett indicate, factual information in his letters is not to be trusted without independent verification.

Charles Dudley Warner:  See Correspondents.

William Walter PhelpsWikipedia says "William Walter Phelps (August 24, 1839 - June 17, 1894) was a United States Congressman [from New Jersey] and diplomat who served as United States Ambassador to Germany and Austria-Hungary.... After the birth of his two sons, he bought a summer home in Bergen County [New Jersey] an old-fashioned Dutch farmhouse on the "Teaneck Ridge," an area of Teaneck now adjacent to Route 4 that had been the Garret-Brinkerhoff House in Revolutionary War days. Phelps extensively renovated the old homestead, converting it into one of the most beautiful and celebrated mansions of its time."  Buell may be incorrect, then, about the location of the Phelps farm.

General John Hawley, Sam Bowles (Old Sam), Jake [Brawley?] and Mark Twain:  General John Hawley may be John Baldwin Hawley  (February 9, 1831 - May 24, 1895) who, according to Wikipedia, was a U.S. Representative from Illinois.  "Born in Hawleyville, Connecticut, Hawley moved with his parents to Carthage, Illinois, in 1833. He attended the public schools and Jacksonville College, Jacksonville, Illinois. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1854 and commenced practice at Rock Island, Illinois.... Hawley was elected State's attorney in 1856 and served four years. Enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War and served as captain of Company H, Forty-fifth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry."
    "Samuel Bowles III (February 9, 1826 – January 16, 1878) was an American journalist born in Springfield, Massachusetts. Beginning in 1844 he was the publisher and editor of the Springfield Republican, a position he held until his death in 1878."  He is particularly remembered as a friends and correspondent of the American poet, Emily Dickinson (December 10, 1830 - May 15, 1886).
    Jake Brawley, if the name is correct, has not been identified.
    Of Mark Twain, Wikipedia says: "Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 - April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. Among his writings are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885)...."  In the 1870s, his family lived in Hartford, CT, where they were friends and neighbors of Charles Dudley Warner.

Talcott's Mountain:  Talcott Mountain in Talcott Mountain State Park is about 9 miles west from Hartford, CT., and about 120 miles from Teaneck, NJ.

Simsbury ... John Buell:  Simsbury, CT is about 12 miles northwest from Hartford.  The History of the Buell Family in England: From the Remotest Times Ascertainable from Our Ancient Histories, and in America, from Town, Parish, Church and Family Records. Illustrated with Portraits and Coat Armorial (1881) records no John Buell who served in a Royal Provincial Regiment and died in 1708.

The ms. of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: bMS Am 1743 (31); transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Monday.  [November 1900]

     I wish to tell you one thing, dear, that I knew Lieutenant Wallingford was killed, none better, but how could I write about him unless I kept him alive?* -- There is something so strange now, that I can hardly believe it myself. I thought about him and his house and the members of the family whom I have known, and made him a Tory and had Mary W. -- challenge him to his duty, all out of my own imagination; and on Saturday I got a package of notes from Mr. Buell in which it is proved that Wallingford was a Tory and his lady love declined to marry him for that reason; at last he took her challenge and went to sea. He confessed to Paul Jones that he had come for a lady's sake and not from his principles.* Part of this is told almost in my words of the story, as you shall see. Now how could I have guessed, at his character, and what was likely to happen, and better? Imagination is the only true thing in the world!!*


Notes

November 1900:  As the notes for Buell's first, October 27, 1900 letter to Jewett indicate, factual information in his letters is not to be trusted without independent verification.

Lieutenant Wallingford ... Mary W.: Characters in Jewett's novel, The Tory Lover (1901). Roger Wallingford, her hero, is based on the historical character, Samuel Wallingford, who had actually been killed at sea. Mary Hamilton -- eventually Wallingford -- is the heroine.

Mr. Buell ... confessed to Paul Jones: Buell's note confirms Jewett's conception of the relationship she imagined between Wallingford and Mary Hamilton in The Tory Lover.  According to Walter Green, son of the ship's doctor on the Ranger, Samuel Wallingford -- upon whom Roger was based -- was a Lieutenant of Marines, and he left an infant son at his death, George Washington Wallingford, who was born at Somersworth, N.H. and became a distinguished lawyer (Preble and Green, Diary of Ezra Green, 1875).  Samuel Wallingford was married for at least some time before joining Jones's crew in 1777.  It is, therefore, a sad and interesting irony that Buell probably based his inventions upon Jewett's imagination, rather than Jewett intuiting a truth about the past.  Evidence in The Tory Lover further suggests that Jewett read Buell's book before finishing her novel and accepted as truth (as did many readers for years after its publication) the elaborate and romantic fictions Buell constructed. 

in the world!: In "The Unpublished Love Poems of Sarah Orne Jewett." Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 4.3 (1979): 26-31 (Reprinted in Nagel, Critical Essays on Sarah Orne Jewett), Josephine Donovan shows that Annie Fields, with the advice of Mark De Wolfe Howe, altered Jewett's letters in her collection.  This letter has been restored partially to its original form by correcting two minor changes:
    which it is proved that Wallingford was a Tory; ["was" is not underlined in Fields's transcription.]
    only true thing in the world!! [Fields's transcription shows only one exclamation point]

Yesterday;  In a more significant deviation from the original, Fields combined two letters.  This paragraph beginning "Yesterday I took up an old volume" is from another letter.  As this paragraph offers no clue about its composition date and the original of this letter has not yet been located, the paragraph remains here.

Scott's "Lives of the Novelists" ... Horace Walpole and Dr. Johnson and Goldsmith: Sir Walter Scott's Lives of the Novelists (1821-24). Horace Walpole (1717-1797) is best known for inventing the Gothic novel in The Castle of Otranto (1764).

short essays of Edmund Gosse's that Louise Guiney ... nice paper about Edward Fitzgerald: This essay on Fitzgerald appears in Edmund Gosse's (1849-1928) Critical Kit-Kats (1896). Gosse quotes Fitzgerald as saying that he thinks he must be damned for the "idle ease" of going off to fish with a fellow fisherman, having tea in a pothouse, and walking home (71).    
    For Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920), American poet, see Correspondents.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




SOJ to Annie Adams Fields

     Monday.  [November 1900]*

     *Yesterday I took up an old volume of Scott's "Lives of the Novelists,"* and read the brief sketches of Horace Walpole and Dr. Johnson and Goldsmith with great delight.* He did them so lightly with such ease and good sense. How one admires that great man more and more! I must tell you that in a book of short essays of Edmund Gosse's that Louise Guiney* gave me last Christmas, I found a very nice paper about Edward Fitzgerald. I always love that bit about his having been reading and lazily sitting in his garden idly to watch things grow, "for which I think I shall be damned!" as he complacently adds.*

Notes

November 1901:  In Fields's collection, this paragraph appears at the end of the other November 1900 letter to Fields in which she discusses Augustus Buell's "revelation" about Lieutenant Wallingford.  Fields combined these two letters, but they are separated here.  With only one clue about its actual composition date, that it probably came after 1896, the letter is placed as Fields did, with other letters of 1900.

Scott's "Lives of the Novelists" ... Horace Walpole and Dr. Johnson and Goldsmith: Sir Walter Scott's Lives of the Novelists (1821-24). Horace Walpole (1717-1797) is best known for inventing the Gothic novel in The Castle of Otranto (1764).

short essays of Edmund Gosse's that Louise Guiney ... nice paper about Edward Fitzgerald: This essay on Fitzgerald appears in Edmund Gosse's (1849-1928) Critical Kit-Kats (1896). Gosse quotes Fitzgerald as saying that he thinks he must be damned for the "idle ease" of going off to fish with a fellow fisherman, having tea in a pothouse, and walking home (71).    
    For Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920), American poet, see Correspondents.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College. 



Augustus Buell to SOJ
 

November 8, 1900 *
1913 Judson Place.
Philadelphia.

My dear Miss Jewett,

     I have received your interesting letter of the 7th; also the magazine with your delightful story of Old Berwick. A single phrase in it, if there were nothing else, would make it charming to one like me, a descendant of several generations of Nantucket and New Bedford sailors.* It is the phrase (p. 607) "the cords which were fastened at one end to the Landing wharves seemd to wind all about the other side of the world!"*

     That is the prettiest bit of the "poetry of ocean's commerce" I have ever seen. Poetry and commerce do not coalesce in our time but they did in those old days of Argosies and Argonauts. Steam and steel have changed all that now, but we still have left to us the classic memories you so sweetly invoke.

     You need not return the Wallingford note. I sent it to you to keep.

     The legend* is referred to in a footnote to the Diary of Dr. Ezra Green, (p. 25) of the reprint of 1875, by his son Walter Cooper Green; in the papers of Commodore [George?] Henry Preble; in Willis's Sketch of George W. Wallingford (Lawyer of Maine, p. 253) -- as well as I can remember without having the book before me; in the Narrative of Henry Gardner (New Bedford, 1826) and besides these printed references, it was related to me personally several years ago by an old Maine Sea Captain, named Hamilton [Grant?] -- whose name you will find in the Ranger's roster among those hailing from Portsmouth.*

     The name of the young Lady I cannot distinctly recollect, but it is given in Willis's sketch of George W. Wallingford. My impression is that she was a Gilman, but it would not be safe to assume that my own impression on a subject that has been long "snowed under in memory" is correct. I am sure that she was closely related to Major Jeremiah Gilman of the First New Hampshire Line, because I distinctly recollect Captain Hamilton [Grant?]* tell using the two names together in his story; but whether she was his daughter or niece of another name, I cannot now say. You notice that I said in the note "she shall be nameless here." I would have given her name had I been sure of it. I have [in / a?] copy, from the original mss.

Very truly,

Augustus C. Buell.


Notes

1900:  This letter was written on letterhead, so the address is printed, but the date and text are added.
    Jewett and Buell exchanged a number of letters in late 1900 about The Tory Lover (1900-1901), then appearing in serial.  As the notes for Buell's first, October 27, 1900 letter to Jewett indicate, factual information in his letters is not to be trusted without independent verification.

other side of the world:  Buell quotes from Jewett's The Old Town of Berwick (1894).

Nantucket and New Bedford sailors:  The History of the Buell Family in England: From the Remotest Times Ascertainable from Our Ancient Histories, and in America, from Town, Parish, Church and Family Records. Illustrated with Portraits and Coat Armorial (1881) does not confirm Buell's assertion of Nantucket and New Bedford sailors among his ancestors.

the legend:  Buell refers to the story he confirmed for Jewett, in a fiction of his own invention, that she had intuited correctly that Samuel Wallingford, the person on whom she based her character, Roger Wallingford, in The Tory Lover (1901) was a Tory and had to be persuaded by his sweetheard to fight for American independence despite his beliefs before she would marry him. 
    Ezra Green (1746-1847) was "surgeon on board the continental ship-of-war 'Ranger,' under John Paul Jones, from November 1, 1777 to September 27, 1778."  Not surprisingly, there is no footnote in Ezra Green's diary confirming this legend.
    Wikipedia says: "George Henry Preble (February 25, 1816 - March 1, 1885) was an American naval officer and writer, notable for his history of the flag of the United States and for taking the first photograph of the Fort McHenry flag that inspired "The Star-Spangled Banner."  He assisted in the publication of Ezra Green's diary.  No record has been discovered of his knowing more about Samuel Wallingford than what appears in the diary.
    Whether such information appears in "Narrative of Henry Gardner" is doubtful, but this has not been established.  Assistance is welcome.
    In A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine: From Its First Colonization to the Early Part of the Present Century (1863), William Willis sketches the life of "George Washington Wallingford," and includes a lengthy account of his father's actions with John Paul Jones.  Contrary to Buell's memory, Willis does not name George's mother, Lydia Baker (1759-1828).  Whether Lydia Baker is related to the Gilman family has not been ascertained.  Jewett, however, was connected with the Gilman family.

Hamilton Grant:  No one with a name like "Hamilton Grant" is in fact included in Buell's roster for The Ranger.

The ms. of this letter is held by the Houghton Library, Harvard University: bMS Am 1743 (31); transcription and notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.




 SOJ to Sarah Wyman Whitman

     South Berwick, Maine, Friday night, late.
    [late in 1900]*

     My very dear Friend, -- I have dared to look into the Tennyson Life, late as it is, and I believe that I have read the greater part of it, making believe that I was only cutting the leaves. "The longer I live," he says once, "the more I value kindness and simplicity among the sons and daughters of men."

     I think the book makes him live again; it was a wonderful face, and he was far and away the greatest man I have ever seen. There was a kindness and simplicity -- oh, most beautiful! but a separateness as if he had come from another world.

     But how the days fly by, as if one were riding the horse of Fate and could only look this way and that, as one rides and flies across the world. Oh, if we did not look back and try to change the lost days! if we can only keep our faces toward the light and remember that whatever happens or has happened, we must hold fast to hope! I never forget the great window.* I long for you to feel a new strength and peace every day as you work at it, a new love and longing. The light from heaven must already shine through it into your heart.

Notes

late in 1900: The letter's quotation from Tennyson appears in Robert Forman Horton, Alfred Tennyson: a Saintly Life (1900), p. 307.

the great window: Sarah Wyman Whitman (1842-1904) was a designer of stained glass windows. She also designed covers for several of Jewett's books, including Strangers and Wayfarers, which Jewett dedicated to her.
    Given that Jewett is reading a 1900 biography of Tennyson, it seems likely that she refers to Whitman's "Honor and Peace" window in Harvard's Annenberg Hall, also completed in 1900.  The Office for the Arts at Harvard says this window was funded by the Harvard Class of 1865:  '"'This window commemorates those who surrendered their lives in the War of the Rebellion'; [it] ... shows left, 'Honor' sending forth an armed warrior to battle. On the right is 'Peace' welcoming him in his civilian clothes with a wreath. There is no commemorative inscription; however, the two halves most likely refer to the members of the class who went to war (honor) and then returned home (peace)."
    Judith Roman points out that Annie Fields published an essay on Whitman's glass work, "Notes on Glass Decoration," in the Atlantic in June 1899 (807-811).

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



SOJ to Thomas Bailey Aldrich

          South Berwick, Maine.
            [December 1900]

     You and I are such timid young authors that I can now afford distinct reassurance, and say with deep pleasure how much I like your two new stories! You spoke slightingly of "Shaw's Folly,"* but that was the folly of T. B. It is done with such freedom of hand and brightness of touch that I liked it most uncommonly well, and the only shadow of dissatisfaction that a fond reader can find, is that the writer didn't say what the cure might have been for such a sad failure! I suppose it is the old story, that we can't trust sentimentality to build houses, or rather to keep them running on business principles. The distinction between sentiment and sentimentality is a question of character, and is as deep as one can go in life, and kindness must have a sound tap-root. We are trying to speak of model lodgings, rather than of literature that depicted Mr. Shaw! We must go right to A. F. to get straightened out!* But I love the way that you have written that story. There's realism seen from the humorous point of view: the trouble with most realism is that it isn't seen from any point of view at all, and so its shadows fall in every direction and it fails of being art. "All of which is respectfully submitted," as they say in state papers.

     The brilliant tale touches one's imagination the quickest way. I find that it keeps coming to my mind as the "Two Boys in Black" has kept coming these many long years. It puzzles one as if it were one's own experience, and that touch about the handkerchief, on the face, keeps insisting that the lady what did she do if she didn't die? But this is getting to be a painful one-sided talk instead of a letter, and I must end it. I wonder if you are all as happy as you were the other morning? I feel as if I had looked in at the window and seen you all by accident, and as if I mustn't even think about it myself! There is only one word more: please keep on writing!

Notes

"Shaw's Folly" ... "Two Boys in Black": Thomas Bailey Aldrich's story, "Shaw's Folly," appeared in Harper's in December 1900 and was collected in A Sea Turn and Other Matters (1902). No evidence has surfaced that Aldrich wrote anything of the title "Two Boys in Black," nor has a story of this title by any author been located.  Any information would be welcome.

A. F.: Annie Fields (1834-1915).  See Correspondents.

This letter appears in Annie Fields, Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett (1911),  Transcribed by Annie Adams Fields, with notes by Terry Heller, Coe College.



Edited by Terry Heller, Coe College.



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