Mate of the Daylight
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The Confession of a House-Breaker

Sarah Orne Jewett


Table of differences between the text appearing in The Mate of the Daylight and the text in Atlantic Monthly.
 
 

Paragraph The Mate of the Daylight Atlantic Monthly
1 before the sun himself did, and before the sun himself, and
2 and had heard one sleepy and I had heard one sleepy
3 flowers, and hurried toward them. I went back and forth along the garden walks, flowers, and went out to the garden. I went back and forth along the walks,
4 suspicion of their sorry end. suspicion of the sorry end.
5 pewee began a prelude somewhat

and I hoped that I should

pewee began his side somewhat

and like him I hoped that I should

6 many of his fellow-creatures. many of his fellow creatures.
7 though suddenly I became conscious that one of my friends was awake, and an understanding between us sprang up quickly, like

telegraph between my friend

another remote acquaintance after

clairvoyance I fancied that I could

the physical rest which does us good

though abruptly I became conscious that one of my friends was awake, and an understanding between us sprang up suddenly, like

telegraph that was between my friend

another acquaintance after

clairvoyance that I could

the physical zest which does us good

9 scurrying fearlessly through the air scurrying through the air
10 past my neighbors' house; feeling past my neighbors' houses; feeling
12 A little child cried drearily in a chamber where the blinds were shut, - a tired wail, as if the night had been one of illness, and the morning brought no relief. A great dog lay sleeping soundly in the yard, as if he would not waken for three hours yet. I know him well, good fellow, and I had a temptation to speak to him, to see his surprise; and yet I had not a good excuse. He would simply wonder what made the day so long afterward; and I turned towards home again, lest some other house-breaker might go in where I had come out. A belated pewee, who appeared to have overslept himself, piped up his plaintive morning song, and the pigeons, who are famous sleepy-heads, began to coo and croon, as if they were trying to get themselves to sleep again. The cocks crowed again once or twice apiece all over town, and it was time to go home. The spell of the dawn was lifted; and though I could not resist leaping the front fence instead of opening the gate for myself, I was a little dismayed afterward at such singular conduct, and took pains to look up and down the street, to make sure there were no startled passers-by. A little child cries drearily in a chamber where the blinds are shut, - a tired wail, as if the night had been one of illness, and the morning brought no relief. A great dog lies sleeping soundly in the yard, as if he would not waken for these three hours yet. I know him well, good fellow, and I have a temptation to speak to him, to see his surprise; and yet I have not a good excuse. He would simply wonder what made the day so long afterward; and I turn towards home again, lest some other house-breaker might go in where I have come out. A belated pewee, who appears to have overslept himself, sets up his morning song all by himself, and the pigeons, who are famous sleepy-heads, begin to coo and croon, as if they are trying to get themselves asleep again. The cocks crow again once or twice apiece all over town, and it is time to go home. The spell of the dawn is lifted; and though I cannot resist leaping the front fence instead of opening the gate for myself, I am a little dismayed afterward at such singular conduct, and take pains to look up and down the street, to make sure there are no startled passers-by.
13 The house was still dark, and it seemed hot after the dew and freshness of the out-of-door air; but I locked the door carefully, and stole up-stairs. The east was gorgeous with yellow clouds; the belated pewee was trying to make up for lost time. I heard somebody in the next room give a long sigh, as if of great comfort, and I shut out the dazzling light of the sun, and went to bed again. Presently I heard the mill-bells up and down the river ring out their early call to the tired housekeepers, and I thought it was a reluctant rather than a merry peal; and then I said to myself something about to-morrow - no, it is to-day - yes - but this was daylight that was neither to-morrow's nor yesterday's. And so I fell asleep, The house is still dark, and it seems hot after the dew and freshness of the out-of-door air; but I draw the bolt carefully, and take off my shoes and steal up-stairs. The east is gorgeous with yellow clouds; the belated pewee is trying to make up for lost time. I hear somebody in the next room give a long sigh, as if of great comfort, and I shut out the dazzling light of the sun, and go to bed again. Presently I hear the mill-bells up and down the river ring out their early call to the tired housekeepers, and I think it is a reluctant rather than a merry peal; and then I say to myself something about to-morrow - no, it is to-day - yes - but this was daylight that was neither to-morrow's nor yesterday's. And so I fall asleep,


Mate of the Daylight
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