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Differences between two texts of Sarah Orne Jewett's "An Only Son"

Paragraph # 1884 Version in The Mate of the Daylight 1890 Version in Tales of New England
2 of the town's-poor and the district schools, and afterward of the town's poor and the district schools, and, afterward,
  Kendall the grist-miller rose Kendall, the grist-miller, rose
  knocking his thick shuffling boots clumsily by the way. He reached the sidewalk and looked up and down the street, but nobody was coming; so he turned to Asa Ball the shoemaker, knocking his thick, shuffling boots clumsily by the way. He reached the sidewalk and looked up and down the street, but nobody was coming; so he turned to Asa Ball, the shoemaker,
3 "Business isn't brisk, "Business ain't brisk, 
  had never been even spattered had never once been spattered
  He was considered very peculiar The captain was considered very peculiar
  a large scrap book a large scrap-book
  and had pleased himself by watching and pleased himself by watching
  a braver never had trod the quarter-deck a braver never trod the quarter-deck
7 will be waiting for me, will be waiting dinner for me,
8 old-fashioned country men old-fashioned countrymen
  English Ambassadors English Embassadors
9 clicks and fumbling clicks and fumblings
  He was dusty and sun-burnt He was dusty and sunburnt
  after he had put his worn after he put his worn
  roll of bills almost reluctantly, turned roll of bills almost reluctantly turned
10 There had indeed been a hurried There was indeed a hurried
  when Deacon Price had acknowledged when Deacon Price acknowledged
11 entirely forgotten until that moment entirely forgotten, until that moment,
  she had made him run she made him run
  he had listened to them impassively he listen to them impassively
  But he had promised But he promised
13 said the deacon, a little said the deacon a little
  Eliza 'll be there Eliza 'll get there
  behind them, and without behind them, and, without
  with his niece the deacon with his niece, the deacon
16A something I've been doing - I'm going off" - something I've been doing. I'm going off" --
  about the bread and a piece of cold boiled beef and a row of blueberry pies and the sheet of gingerbread which about the bread, and a piece of cold boiled beef, and a row of blueberry pies, and the sheet of gingerbread, which
  It was the first outing It was the first holiday
  year, except for a half day or so, and year, except for church-going, and
  finally desired his respects finally desiring his respects
16B continues above paragraph new paragraph begins with "There ain't a better man
  real good hearted real good-hearted
17 helpless and forgitful helpless and forgetful
  a man of hard on to eighty a man that's hard on to eighty
  bank money he had long ago bank money he had put away
18 kind of low land and kind of low land, and
  with scarlet fever, the fall with scarlet fever the fall
  one thing after another come upon him one thing after another came upon him
19 and he lost all his interest and lost all his interest
  they knew; Warren they knew. Warren
  said Eliza, mournfully said Eliza mournfully
20 bubbled to the surface a little too late bubbled to the surface, a little too late
  It had been patched and propped before, and now seemed hardly to be repaired. It had been so often patched and propped that it now seemed hardly to be repaired again.
  Just as he had begun Just as he began
  The deacon had given a heavy sigh, and as he had hammered and sawed and built his fence again, there had been more than one sigh to follow it, for had not this only son grown more helpless and useless than ever? The deacon gave a heavy sigh, and as he hammered and sawed and built his fence again, there had been more than one sigh to follow it, for was not this only son more strange and helpless and useless than ever?
21 that now he would attend that next he would attend
22 a slight breeze seemed to be coming a westerly breeze was coming
23 At last he crept then he crept
  son following across it the path that led to son following the path that led across it to
24 and he made the doing and made the doing
25 did not get much sleep either, in the uncomfortable bed which he had tried to put into some order did not get much sleep that night, in the uncomfortable bed which he tried to put into some order
26 wore away, and he tried wore away, while he tried
27 if there was still no sign if there were still no signs
28 make its accusing cry repeat its accusing cry
  at any rate he would at any rate, he would
29 the door of the house, and locked it, the door of the house and locked it,
30 like looking even him in the face, but gave a pull at the reins to hurry the horse and pass by the quicker. like looking him in the face, but gave a pull at the reins to hurry the horse and pass by without question.
  the moon, always with one side hidden the moon, with one side always hidden
  but for the terrible blow of the theft of the town's money, which had left a debt and sorrow on the old man's shoulders but for this terrible blow of the theft of the town's money, which now left a debt and sorrow on the old man's shoulders
31 woods were passed and the road led out to a pleasant country of quite a different character woods were passed, and the road led out to a pleasant country of quite different character
  it was partly the fault of art, and partly of nature, for this was this was partly the fault of art, and partly of nature, for it was
  and its fields had been made swampy and the fields were all made swampy
  arrangement or no-arrangement arrangement of clay, rock, and sand.
  plots of thin hay or plots of thin hay, or
32 father to son generation after father to son, generation after
34 The captain had watched The captain watched
35 cramb'ries hereabouts, another camb'ries hereabouts another
  to tackle it somehow, - see here to tackle it somehow - See here
  it would have been impossible to mistake that he was a sailor it was impossible to mistake the fact of his being a sailor
36 The had ventured upon They ventured upon
37 strange silence, and strange silence; and
  were middling were fair to middling
  couple o' nights a couple of nights
38 "Oh yes, I rec'lect," growled the captain, amiably. "Oh, yes, I rec'lect," growled the captain amiably.
  and off we go and off you go
39 they had seated themselves on the off side of the woodpile, the friends seated themselves on the off side of the wood-pile,
44 said the deacon, humbly, said the deacon humbly,
  the eight hundred dollars ready the seven hundred dollars ready
  the south village of Dalton and the south village of Dalton, and
  volcanoes or outlets volcanoes, or outlets
  those poor wretched damned dogs of heathen to mercy. the poor damned dogs of heathen to mercy.
45 at the future or asking at the future, or asking
47 for Warren in a way he never had before; and as he looked about the house he saw everywhere some evidence of his mechanical skill for Warren in an unexpected way; and as he looked about the house he saw everywhere some evidence of his son's mechanical skill
  of his patient diligence of such patient diligence
  waited 'till he told waited 'til he told
  It was the way we only remember the good qualities of our friends who have died, and let the bad ones fade out of sight, and so know the angels that were growing in them all the while, and out of our sight at last have thrown off the disguise and hindrance of the human shape. It was the way we remember only the good qualities of our friends who have died, and let the bad ones fade out of sight, and so know the angels that were growing in them all the while, and have thrown off the disguise and hindrance of the human shape.
48 standing at the end of the lane in the road, and he meant at first to standing in the road at the end of the lane, and meant at first to
50 at supper time at supper-time
  more severely commented upon most severely commented upon
51 sunburnt women sun-burnt women
  knew so well before knew so well, before
  greet the new comers, greet the new-comers,
52 because lots could come in the evenin' because some could come in the evenin'
  familiar every-day calico familiar everyday calico
53 come down-stairs first, and had gone out to get a piece come downstairs first, and had gone out to find a piece
54 she brought up in triumph the deacon's great brown wallet, she took out the deacon's great brown wallet,
55 and looking at it as if he were afraid it would bite. looking at Eliza angrily and then at the wallet again, and turning it over in his hand.
57 I felt some uneasy about it," and he went out to the yard, and beyond it to the garden, and beyond the garden I felt some uneasy about it." Presently he went out to the yard, and across the garden, and beyond the garden
58 a slate headstone a slate head-stone
  romance in John Price's romance in Deacon Price's
59 machine had been proved to a success machine had proved to be a success
  who had promised who gladly promised
60 He looked pale Warren looked pale
61 smart up a little smart us up a little
62 to sleep, Eliza had said to sleep, Eliza said
  She never was told Eliza never was told
  He might have known The deacon might have known
63 the deacon drove up to the captain's farm, Deacon Price drove up to Captain Stone's farm,
  perched on the chopping log again, and the confession perched on the chopping-log again, while the confession

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