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A Native of Winby Contents

The Flight of Betsey Lane.

Sarah Orne Jewett.

Table of Differences between A Native of Winby text and the Scribner's text.

Notes

     In the Scribner's text contractions are closed, whereas they are opened in the Native of Winby text. Examples: Scribner's: tain't, 'tis, 'twas, etc. A Native of Winby: 't aint, 't is, 't was. I have not listed such changes on the table below.

     In Scribner's everyone when referring to a group of people is a single word; in A Native of Winby this is always two words.

     Shed chamber is inconsistently hyphenated in Scribner's.
 
 

Paragraph A Native of Winby Scribner's
1 morning in May, three old morning in May three old
2 in stout brown ginghams 

difficult and tiresome, -- plain

great dignity and,

day's work with anybody: but

in stout, brown ginghams

difficult and tiresome -- plain

great dignity, and,

day's work with anybody, but

3 opinion -- chiefly opinion -- and held

after much illness, which ended

opinion, chiefly opinion; and held

after much illness which ended

4 secret of her years; and as

by twenty years because her

secret of her years, and as

by twenty years, because her

5 of seed corn hanging from the brown cross-beams, its spare churns, and
 

keeper of the poor-house

nothing interesting, but there

homely about the place. It was

of seed-corn hanging from the brown cross-beams, its spare churns and

keeper of the Poor-house

nothing interesting; but there

homely about the place; it was

6 own handful high, as if own handful high as if
12 said Betsey presently said Betsey, presently
13 quiet in the barnyard quiet in the barn-yard
14 Oh my! I wish Oh, my! I wish
15 suggested Mrs. Dow pompously

a daughter married, -- all shipmasters, and she'd been with her own husband when they was young. She was left a widder early, and fetched up her family herself, -- a
 

an' she got a notion

and so did. An' then

suggested Mrs. Dow, pompously

a daughter married -- all shipmasters, and she'd been with her own husband when they was young; she was left a widder early, and fetched up her family herself -- a

and she got a notion

and so she did. And then

17 she kep' 'em mended up, an' would go below and tend to 'em if they was sick. She might 'a' been she kep' [']em mended up, an' would go below and tend to 'em if they was sick. She might 'a['] been
20 nodded somewhat jealously, and nodded somewhat jealously and
21 Then she disappeared, and closed Then she disappeared and closed
22 if we ha'n't now if we hain't now
24 hearin' ain't up to whar it was hearin' ain't up to what it was
27 window-sill, and then flitted

with the lady. She had

window-sill and then flitted

with the lady; she had

28 "Lor', dear," she said

like the old gen'ral

"Lor['], dear," she said

like the old gin'ral

29 was younger as I do now. Perhaps next summer we shall all come over for a while was younger, as I do now. Perhaps next summer we shall all come over for awhile
31 Mrs. Strafford kindly, -- "anything Mrs. Strafford, kindly, "anything
32 small lookin'-glass small lookin' glass
33 "No; I'm going back next week "No, I'm going back next week
34 mistress of the poor-farm

after things, -- she remembered I was always her gran'ma's right hand. Oh, it does

mistress of the Poor-farm

after things -- she remembered I was always her gran'ma's right hand. Oh! it does

36 ready; I was just

smart with them beans, -- all

ready -- I was just

smart with them beans -- all

37 waifs and strays, -- creatures

with excitement; in fact, she could not eat as much as usual, and she looked up from time to time expectantly
 

attempted confidences by asking

chair back; she always helped with the housework, -- a thin

waifs and strays -- creatures

with excitement, in fact she could not eat as much as usual, and she looked up from time to time, expectantly

attempted confidences, by asking

chair back -- she always helped with the housework -- a thin

38 responded Betsey calmly.

the company, who would have liked to hear the bit of morning news, were
 

a gentle rise, where she

responded Betsey, calmly.

the company who would have liked to hear the bit of morning news were

a gentle rise where she

39 stealthily about, and then put her hand inside her gown, and for the first time took out the money that Mrs. Strafford had given her. She turned it over and over with an astonished look: there were new bank-bills for a hundred dollars. Betsey gave a funny little shrug of her shoulders, came out of the bushes, and took stealthily about and then put her hand inside her gown and for the first time took out the money that Mrs. Strafford had given her. She turned it over and over with an astonished look; there were new bank-bills for a hundred dollars. Betsey gave a funny little shrug of her shoulders, came out of the bushes and took
40 chuckling, and looking over

the poor-house family; and

who stood on guard, with

at statuary, -- an upright stake and bar in the form of a cross. This stood on the highest part of the field; and as the men knelt near it, and

chuckling and looking over 

the Poor-House family; and

who stood on guard with

at statuary -- an upright stake and bar in the form of a cross. This stood on the highest part of the field, and as the men knelt near it and

41 strange family, related only strange family related only
42 nothin' afore 'thout talking it over a fortnight, and nothin' afore, 'thout talking it over a fortnight and
43 on her mother's side that went on her mother's side, that went
44 "I heard her a-groanin' in her sleep. I was wakeful the forepart o' the night, --  "I heard her a groanin' in her sleep. I was wakeful the forepart o' the night -- 
45 old friend, with more resentment than melancholy. They sat together almost in silence that morning in the shed chamber.

into long ropes, to be made

but failing this new subject, they

in the shed chamber

old friend with more resentment than melancholy. They sat together almost in silence that morning in the shed-chamber.

into long ropes to be made 

but failing this new subject they

in the shed-chamber

46 in fact, she had disappeared

laughter, -- it was at supper-time on a Sunday night, -- but

in fact she had disappeared

laughter -- it was at supper-time on a Sunday night -- but

49 Mis' Bland, that used to live neighbor to our folks," said one of the old men. "She was dreadful precise; an'
 

forty year, an' baited

Mis' Bland that used to live neighbor to our folks," said one of the old men. "She was dreadful precise, an'

forty year an' baited

50 said Peggy Bond approvingly. "She was a good-appearin' woman, said Peggy Bond, approvingly. "She was a good appearin' woman,
51 gone far, if it's so gone far if it's so
52 keeper's wife suggested mildly keeper's wife suggested, mildly
54

54 & 55 are merged in Scribner's

excursions afoot. She dearly loved

best bundle-handkerchief, one

dead pine-tree, where

excursions afoot; she dearly loved

best bundle handkerchief, one

dead pine-tree where

55 "Yes, I be," she "Yes, I be;" she
56 along the railway track

a standstill, waiting at a turnout

along the railway-track

a stand-still, waiting at a turn-out

57 she asked pleasantly she asked, pleasantly
61 consid'able early, if you're

o' distress, an' none

consid'able early if you're

o' distress an' none

63 the embankment, and found her

empty box-car by two

incident of the freight train was

the embankment and found her

empty box-car, by two

incident of the freight-train was

64A. [Omitted in The Native of Winby].      Nobody in these United States has ever felt half grateful enough to the promoters of the Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia. It was the first great national occasion of general interest and opportunity for cultivation; as a people we were untravelled and unconvinced of many things until we were given this glimpse of the treasures and customs of the world. Without it we should never have been ready for the more advanced lessons of the great Columbian Fair at Chicago.
64B. I call the Centennial somethin' like the day o' judgment I call it somethin' like the day o' judgment
65 a patent pop-corn establishment, which had given her a sudden reminder of home, and 

great wooden chopping-tray for

a patent-pop-corn establishment which had given her a sudden reminder of home and 

great wooden chopping tray for

66 expectant smile, as if you

hundreds of people came from, and

doing before, and this hastened

oculist and instrument-maker.

expectant smile as if you

hundreds of people came from and

doing before; and this hastened

oculist and instrument maker.

67 friend that's upsighted friend that's up-sighted
69 "'Tis Miss Peggy Bond I "'Tis Peggy Bond I
72 throat decisively, and smoothed

rustic bench together.

throat decisively and smoothed

rustic bench together [to-together].

76 explained Betsey reluctantly; "but I know her to be nigh to seventy-six, one way or t' other

being upsighted. But there, I feel for her, -- everybody does; it keeps her stubbin' an' trippin' against everything, beakin' and gazin' up the way she has to."

explained Betsey, reluctantly; "but I know her to be nigh to seventy-six, one way or t'other

being up-sighted. But there, I feel for her, everybody does; it keeps her stubbin' an' trippin' against everything -- beakin' an' gazin' up the way she has to."

77 this summer, - some time this summer - some time
78 the Byfleet Farm has got our ails the Byfleet farm has got our ails
79 mustn't forget to speak

if she'd had a proper chance

mustn't forgit to speak

if she'd had proper chance

80 shores of Byfleet [Byfield] pond

wide gingham skirt, and aggravated

shores of Byfleet pond

wide gingham skirt and aggravated

81 here on the side-hill here on the side hill
82 I'm a-doin' of all this

this day, -- 't is just nine days 

be'n like herself, a-broodin'

I'm a doin' of all this

this day, 'tis just nine days 

be'n like herself, a broodin'

83 hope we sha'n't find her

off a-visitin' way over to the other side o' South Byfleet; some

hope we shan't find her

off a visitin' way over to the other side o' South Byfleet, some

84 wheezed Mrs. Dow indignantly wheezed Mrs. Dow, indignantly
85 The clear blue sky overhead, the dark pine-woods beyond the pond, were all clearly pictured in her mind. "Can't you see nothin'?" she faltered; "I believe I'm wuss 'n upsighted The clear, blue sky overhead, the dark pine-woods beyond the pond, were all clearly pictured in her mind. "Can't you see nothin'?" she faltered; "I believe I'm wuss 'n up-sighted
86-7 I hope to mercy she ain't" -- 

     "Why, whoever'd

I hope to mercy she ain't -- "

     "Why, whoever'd

90 Pennsylvany; and I see 

made spool cotton, an' sights o' other things; an' I spoke 

South Byfleet depot; an' there was hogs there that weighed risin' thirteen hunderd" --

Pennsylvany, and I see

made spool cotton; an' sights o' other things, an' I spoke

South Byfleet depot -- an' there was hogs there that weighed risin' thirteen hunderd --"

93 Mis' Katy Strafford give me a han'some present o' money that day she come to see me; and I'd be'n a-dreamin' by night an' day o' seein' that Centennial;

take my bundle-handkercher

Miss Katy Strafford give me a han'some present o' money that day she come to see me; and I'd be'n a dreamin' by night an' day o' seein' that Centennial,

take my bundle handkercher

94 toward the poor-house toward the Poor-house

 


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