Main Contents
Contents Old Friends and New

A Late Supper

Sarah Orne Jewett

Table of Differences between the texts in Old Friends and New and in Sunday Afternoon.


Paragraph Old Friends and New Sunday Afternoon
1 Miss Catherine Spring was the heroine; and .... 

village street in Brookton, - up in the country city people would say, - 

...but, for all that, life

bad people and good people, its 

Miss Catherine Spring was the heroine, and ....

village street in Brookton - up in the country city people would say - 

...but for all that life

bad people and good people; its

2 shaded by a green old lilac-bush.

laid it down altogether, and 

with her thimble, and looking 

people would tell you; and they

to tell the truth, her money affairs

dead for many years; and she

prim, white house, after

It is, after all, a great satisfaction

shaded by a green old lilac bush.

laid it down altogether and

with her thimble, looking 

people would tell you, and they

to tell the truth her money affairs

dead for many years, and she

prim white house, after 

It is after all a great satisfaction

3 other way of living, beside having her own house and

take some boarders; but

not actually lost: it was 

other way of living beside having her own house, and 

take some boarders, but

not actually lost; it was

4 to think it out, and settle

settle it somehow, I will not 

not at all strong. There were three children, with nobody

remembered the wistful way Mary

most disdainfully: the dread 

write Mary that evening, so the letter 

to think it out and settle

settle it somehow; I will not 

not at all well. There were three children with nobody

remembered the yearning way Mary

most disdainfully; the dread

write Mary that evening so the letter

5 on with her stitching, feeling lighter-hearted now 

clock struck three slowly; and she

rustling through the lilac-leaves. The wide street was left to itself, nobody

smiled in sympathy; for her heart

And, when she looked round the room, it seemed very pleasant to her, the clock ticked steadily; and the old-fashioned chairs, and

no place like home.' - I believe 

on with her stitching feeling lighter-hearted, now 

clock struck three slowly, and she

rustling through the lilac leaves. The wide street was left to itself; nobody 

smiled in sympathy, for her heart

And when she looked round the room it seemed very pleasant to her; the clock ticked steadily, and the old fashioned chairs and

no place like home' - I believe

6 click of the gate-latch; and, with the start and curiosity

at the front-door, she hurried to the other front-window

click of the gate latch, and with the start and curiosity

at the front door, she hurried to the other front window

7 "Come in, dear!"  "Come in dear!" 
8 into the sitting-room, and into the sitting-room and
9 Why, no, I never keep help Why no, I never keep help
10 said the child. "I'm small of my age; but  said the child, "I'm small of my age but 
12 down by the Sandy-river Bridge. 

a grown-up, old-fashioned way; "but times are going to be dreadful hard, they say, and it takes a good deal to keep so many."

down by Sandy River bridge. 

a grown-up old fashioned way; "but times are going to be dreadful hard, and it takes a good deal to keep so many."

13 child, who ought to be still at play, should

in the house; but it never

child who ought to be still at play should

in the house, but it never

14 "Mr. Rand, at the post-office, told aunt that perhaps you might want me: he couldn't think of any body else." "Mr. Rand at the post-office told aunt that perhaps you might want me; he couldn't think of anybody else."
15 a neat-looking, well-mended child, and looked Miss Catherine in the face so honestly!  a neat looking, well mended child, and looked Miss Catherine in the face so honestly.
16 "I'm really sorry," said Miss Spring; "but you see, I'm thinking

mind a baby, couldn't you? No: you sit still a minute!" as the child thanked her, and rose

best pound-cakes, which she made

pretty pink-and-white china plate,

said she, as she came back,

You have walked a long ways, and it'll do you good.

"I'm really sorry," said Miss Spring, "but you see I'm thinking

mind a baby, couldn't [could'nt] you? - No, you sit still a minute!" as the child thanked her and rose 

best pound cakes, which she made

pretty pink and white china plate, 

said she as she came back,

You have walked a long ways and it'll do you good.

17 Katy looked at her with surprise and gratitude. "I'm very much obliged," said she; and Katy looked [loooked] at her with surprise and gratitude. "I'm very much obliged," said she, and
18 praised her pound-cakes, nobody had so delighted in their goodness as this

and not very good bread at that.

praised her pound cakes, nobody had so delighted in their goodness, as this

and not very nice bread at that.

19 "Don't hurry," said Miss Spring kindly, "you're a good girl, and I wish I could take you, - I declare I do." And, with a little sigh, she sat down by the window again, and took up the much-neglected sewing,

looked at it wistfully as she put it down, she took it without a word, and

"Don't hurry," said Miss Spring, kindly; "you're a good girl and I wish I could take you: I declare I do;" and, with a little sigh, she sat down by the window again and took up the much neglected sewing,

looked at it wistfully, as she put it down, she took it without a word and

20 "It's real pleasant here," said Katy, "you're so good! Aunt said I could tell you, if you wanted to take me, that I don't tear my clothes, "It's real pleasant here," said Katy; "you're so good! Aunt said I could tell you, if you wanted to take me, that I don't hurt my clothes,
21 said Miss Catherine; "and I'll get you a good home if I can."

she had promised less, and

said Miss Catherine, "and I'll get you a good home, if I can."

she had promised less and

22 were coming in; and she were coming in, and she
23 think," said they: "we meant to be back right away." - "Well," said the niece, "I'm so glad we found you at home; and how think," said they; "we meant to be back right away." "Well," said the niece, "I'm so glad we found you at home, and how
24 the salt of the earth." And he gave her a most affectionate and resounding great kiss, the salt of the earth," and he gave her a most affectionate and resounding great kiss;
25 sitting down for, without laying off

into the yard, Joseph: there's some

know where to find it." And, after

as far as Brookton; and she seemed very pleased. She 

who was very old, and a great deal

her a world of good; and luckily

comfortable and happy and unenvious 

sitting down for without laying off

into the yard, Joseph; there's some

know where to find it;" and, after

as far as Brookton, and she seemed very happy. She

who was very old and a great deal

her a world of good, and luckily

comfortable and happy, and unenvious 

26 the two pound-cakes Katy Dunning 

very pleasant and sociable: and they

Joseph took his hat, saying that

the two pound cakes Katy Dunning 

very pleasant and sociable, and they

Joseph took his hat saying that

28 She is a widow, and She is a widow and
29 said Miss Catherine emphatically, and said Miss Catherine, emphatically, and
30 Sha'n't I come out and help you, Aunt Catherine?" who said, "No indeed;"

"Oh, what am I going to do?"

Shan't I come out and help you, Aunt Catherine?" who said "No indeed;" 

"Oh, what am I going to do!"

31 its quick little cluck,

promised to have tea early; so

Poor woman! she felt as if

It was silly! - she had made

its queer little cluck, 

promised to have tea early, so

Poor woman; she felt as if

It was silly! She had made

32 not had to hurry; and

baking in the oven, and some

cream in his tea; so she called her niece Martha to the kitchen, and asked
 

sun-bonnet: it was not a great way, and shady under the elms; so

she said; "Now, what did you bring 

not had to hurry, and

baking in the oven and some

molasses gingerbread beside, when she cream in his tea; so she called her niece Martha to the kitchen and asked

sun-bonnet; it was not a great way, and shady under the elms, so

she said, "Now what did you bring

33 said Miss Spring; and with a word or two more she went hurrying home. As I have said, it was not far; but said Miss Spring, and with a word or two more she went hurrying home. As I have said, it was not far, but
34-5 when, to her horror, the train suddenly moved. She screamed, "Stop! stop!" but nobody saw her, and nobody heard her; and off she went, cream-pitcher and all, without a bit of a bonnet. It was simply awful.

     The car behind her was the smoking-car, and the one on which she stood happened to be the Pullman. She was dizzy, and did not dare to stay where she was; so she opened the door and went in.

when to her horror the train suddenly moved. She screamed "Stop! stop!" but nobody saw her and nobody heard her, and off she went, cream-pitcher and all, without a bit of a bonnet. It was simply awful.

35.     The car behind her was the smoking car, and the one on which she stood happened to be the Pullman. She was dizzy and did not dare to stay where she was, so she opened the door and went in.

35 in the passage-way, getting a drink

in a dainty little tumbler; and she

wished to speak; and she smiled,

in the passage way getting a drink

in a dainty little tumbler, and she

wished to speak, and she smiled,

36 "I'm carried off," said poor Aunt Catherine hysterically.

Oh! what shall I do? I'm

"I'm carried off," said poor Aunt Catherine, hysterically.

Oh, what shall I do! I'm

37 next station; is it very far? next station: is it very far?
38 said Miss Spring despairingly; "and said Miss Spring, despairingly, "and
39 you didn't try to get off," said the girl gravely: "you might you didn't get off," said the girl gravely; "you might
40 of the compartment, and on

felt comforted at once; and when

of the compartment; and on

felt comforted at once, and when

41 rode off, and could tell them!["] rode off, and could tell them!"
42 in a long time, the fun of the thing outweighed the misery,

nearer the mountains for the summer. Miss Ashton was just getting over a severe illness; and they asked about the place to which they were bound, but 

in a long time; the fun of the thing overshadowed the misery,

nearer the mountains, for the summer. Miss Ashton was just getting over a severe illness, and they asked about the place to which they were bound; but 

44 said Miss Spring; and then she stopped, and flushed a little. I believe, if she had thought a moment, she would not have spoken; but Miss Ashton saw the hesitation and the flush. said Miss Spring, and then she stopped and flushed a little. I believe if she had thought a moment she would not have spoken; and Miss Ashton saw the hesitation and the flush.
45 said she, by and by, in her frank pleasant way. And Miss Catherine said, "I wish you were," and sighed quietly; she felt wonderfully at home with these strangers, and, in spite

something else; and, if she had been alone with Miss Ashton, I think

said she, by and by, in her frank pleasant way; and Miss Catherine said, "I wish you were," and sighed quietly; she felt wonderfully at home with these strangers, and in spite

something else; and if she had been alone with Miss Ashton I think

46 next station; and, after paying him, gave as much money next station, and after paying him gave as much money
47 how to thank you," said she; "but how to thank you," said she, "but
48 No, indeed!" said the girl: but Miss Spring looked unhappy; and Miss Ashton, with truer kindness, gave her the direction, saying, -  No, indeed!" said the girl; but Miss Spring looked unhappy, and Miss Ashton with truer kindness gave her the direction, saying:
49 friends at home; because Alice friends at home, because Alice
50 You have been so kind; I sha'n't  You have been so kind, I sha'n't 
51 from her travelling-bag a little white

in some paper, when Miss Catherine 

from her travelling bag a little

in some paper when Miss Catherine 

54 had not tasted any thing so delicious

Yes, indeed: they had more than

had not tasted any-thing so delicious

Yes, indeed. They [they] had more than

55 most cordially, and were so sorry to say good-by most cordially and were so sorry to say good-bye
55 her off the car, and nodded good-by her off the car and nodded good-bye
57 happened to be just here, happened to be right here,
58 but aunty, I think it was but, aunty, I think it was
59 wait for the down-train, said to herself, 

be stared at and made fun of.["] They had been so courteous and simple and kind: why are there not more such people in the world?["] 

over her forehead; she paid

wait for the down train, said to herself: 

be stared at and made fun of. They have been so courteous and simple and kind; why are there not more such people in the world?" 

over her forehead. She paid

60 the gingerbread; and the niece took them out of the oven, and 

gone a good while, and went

went to the front-gate to look

Miss Stanby joined her; and they

the gingerbread, and the niece took them out of the oven and 

gone a good while -- and went

went to the front gate to look

Miss Stanby joined her, and they

61 something or other: they're always asking her advice about things," said he carelessly.

into the house; and nobody 
 

louder and louder; and Joseph
 

meaning to show his unconcern, but

something or other; they're always asking her opinion about things," said he, carelessly.

into the house, and nobody 
 

louder and louder, and Joseph
 

meaning to show his unconcern but

62 asked Miss Stanby timidly. asked Miss Stanby, timidly.
63 she had gone to Mrs. Hilton's, Martha? I'll walk down there, and see  she had gone over to Mrs. Hilton's, Martha? I'll walk down there and see 
65 said Mrs. Hilton in dismay. "Why, what can have become of her? She came in before half-past five, in a great hurry; and said Mrs. Hilton, in dismay. "Why, what can have become of her? She came in before half-past five, in a great hurry, and
67 They went out together, and

if they had seen his aunt; and when

looked in the barn even: they went out into the garden and through the house, for she might possibly have come in without being seen; but

They [This] went out together and 

if they had seen his aunt, and when 

looked in the barn, even; they went out in the garden and through the house, for she might possibly have come in without being seen, but

68 It had seemed so foolish at first

Martha Spring said decisively, "She

get some men, and have a regular

until we find her." And they 

all the time, - that it would be

committing suicide, that for a moment her nephew could not resist a smile; but

in confidence, that Miss Spring was somewhat pinched for money, - that 

It had seemed foolish at first

Martha Spring said, decisively: "She

get some men and have a regular

until we find her:" and they 

all the time - that it would be

committing suicide that for a moment her nephew could not resist a smile, but

in confidence that Miss Spring was somewhat pinched for money; that

70 disappearance public. He would go to the depot, there

The church-bell began to ring for Wednesday-evening meeting,

back there, and tell the people

stop at the station, it was

as he walked. To tell the truth, he was thinking about the funeral, and suddenly he heard a familiar voice say, - 

disappearance public; he would go to the depot; there

The church bell began to ring for Wednesday evening meeting,

back there and tell the people

stop at the station; it was a 

as he walked; to tell the truth, he was thinking about the funeral, and suddenly he heard a familiar voice say:

72 "Heavens and earth, Aunt Catherine! Where have you been?" And he caught her by the shoulder, and felt

went home later that evening. "I declare, it took the wits right out of me."

"Heavens and earth, Aunt Catherine! where have you been?" And he caught her by the shoulder and felt

went home, later that evening. "I declare, it took the starch right out of me."

73 had that afternoon, the excitement

Miss Stanby kissed her, and cried

had that afternoon; the excitement

Miss Stanby kissed her and cried

74 over with; and, as soon

that pretty hood! I wish I had

over with, an, as soon

that pretty hood. I wish I had

75 said Miss Catherine. "Well, you said Miss Catherine; "well you
76 very late supper! They were all as hungry as hunters, even poor little Miss Stanby; and the re-action from such suspense made the guests merry enough,
 

since he was there before; and the tea was made fresh over a dry-shingle fire, which blazes in a minute, as every one knows. There were more than enough pound-cakes; and Martha 

very late supper! - they were all as hungry as hunters, even poor little Miss Stanby, and the reaction from such suspense made the guests merry enough;

since he was there before, and the tea was made fresh over a dry-shingle fire, which blazes in a minute as every one knows. There were more than enough pound cakes, and Martha 

77 The moon had come up, and was shining through the trees. It was so cool and fresh and bright an evening, with a little yellow still lingering in the west after the sunset!  The moon had come up and was shining through the trees; it was so cool and fresh and bright an evening, with a little yellow light still lingering in the west after the sunset. 
78 "I saw the prettiest little old-fashioned table up in the garret," "I saw the prettiest little table up in the garret,"
79 "No, you won't," said her husband, with "No, you won't [wont]," said her husband with
80 isn't Wednesday evening, and what isn't Wednesday evening and what
81 talked to Joseph, she must talk

the joke; and, after the 

to bear than that, if you

talked to Joseph; she must talk

the joke; and after the 

to bear than that; if you

82 It rained; and nobody came in 

took it to the window, and looked

proved a pleasant one to read. It was from Alice West, Miss Ashton's niece; and Miss Catherine read it slowly, and 

It rained, and nobody came in 

took it to the window and looked

proved to be a pleasant one to read. It was from Alice West, Miss Ashton's niece; and Miss Catherine read it slowly, and

83 "My dear Miss Spring, - 

like your house; but perhaps 

If Brookton suits my aunt, we may wish to stay as late as October; and

"My dear Miss Spring:

like your house, but perhaps

If Brookton suits aunty, we may want to stay as late as October, and

84 "Yours sincerely,            & nbsp;            "Alice West." Yours sincerely,            & nbsp;            Alice West.["]
85 rubbed against her foot, and purred

heart in the half-hour she had already spent with them. She had wished then that they were coming to her: it would

twenty dollars a week, - that would

save so many steps, and could wait

Mondays and Tuesdays; and how glad she would be of the extra pay! Miss

June twilight, to look at the two familiar front-chambers,

looked so pleasant, and were

being suited. She patted the pillow

thought with pride that they would find no fault with her way of cooking, and

rubbed against her foot and purred

heart in the half hour she had already spent with them. She had wished then, that they were coming to her; it would

twenty dollars a week - that would

save so many steps and could wait

Mondays and Tuesdays, and how glad she would be of the extra pay. Miss

June twilight to look at the two familiar front chambers,

looked so pleasant and were

being suited; she patted the pillow

thought with pride, that they would find no fault with her way of cooking. And

86 people beside their hostess. 

great thankfulness, that it was the loss of her money for a while that
 

so happy to go live at Miss Spring's after all, and did her very best, - a patient, steady, willing little creature she was! and I am sure

people besides their hostess. 

great thankfulness that it was the loss of her money for a while, that
 

so happy to go to live at Miss Spring's after all, and did her very best - a patient, steady, willing little creature she was! And I am sure

88 I am sure you will think, in reading all this, just what I have thought as I told it, - and what Miss Catherine herself felt, - that it was such a wonderfully linked-together chain. All the time she thought she was going wrong, that it was a series of mistakes. "I never will be so miserable again," said she. "It was all ordered for the best; and may the Lord forgive me for doubting his care and goodness as I did that day!" It went straight to her heart the next Sunday, when the old minister said in his sermon, "Dear friends, do not let us forget what the Psalmist says, that the steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord. He plans the way we go; and so let us always try to see what he means in sending us this way or that. Do not let us go astray from wilfulness, or blame him for the work he gives us to do, or the burdens he gives us to carry, since he knows best." I am sure you will think in reading all this, just what I have thought as I told it - and what Miss Catherine herself felt - that it was such a wonderfully linked together chain. All the time she thought she was going wrong, that it was a series of mistakes. "I never will be so miserable again," said she. "It was all ordered for the best, and may the Lord forgive me for doubting His care and goodness as I did that day." It went straight to her heart the next Sunday when the old minister said in his sermon: "Dear friends, do not let us forget what the Psalmist says: that the steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord. He plans the way we go; and so let us always try to see what He means in sending us this way or that. Do not let us go astray from wilfulness, or blame Him for the work He [he] gives us to do, or the burdens he gives us to carry, since he knows best."
89 must make every thing go wrong: we say, 
 

book of sermons, and to see the title of one, "Every Man's Life a Plan of God." I did not read the sermon itself, and have never seen the book again; but

must make everything go wrong; we say, 

book of sermons and to see the title of one: "Every Man's Life a Plan of God." I did not read the sermon itself and have never seen the book again, but

90 Miss Catherine liked:

       Who saith, 'A Whole I planned;
Youth shows but half; trust God: see all, nor be afraid!'"

   Miss Catherine liked: --

    Who saith, 'A Whole I planned;'
Youth shows but half; trust God: see all, nor be afraid!



 
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