Main Contents
Contents: Strangers & Wayfarers
Strangers & Wayfarers Text
Harper's Text

The Taking of Captain Ball
Sarah Orne Jewett
Table of differences between the Stranger's & Wayfarer's Text and the Harper's Magazine Text.

Consistent differences:
    House-keeping and other forms in Harper's becomes housekeeping etc. in S&W.
    Ship-masters in Harper's becomes shipmasters in S&W.
    Willful in Harper's becomes wilful in S&W.
    Free-handed becomes freehanded; dress-maker becomes dressmaker; head-wind becomes headwind; door-step becomes doorstep.
    'Tis" becomes 'T is, and other contractions are opened.
    Harper's is consistent about "the cap'n," while S&W sometimes capitalizes and sometimes does not.
    "Alister" in Harper's becomes "Allister" usually in S&W.
 
 

Paragraph   Strangers & Wayfarers Text   Harper's Text
     
1
    There was a natural disinclination

in the mind of Captain Ball

had not liked much better to live on board ship

decline of the merchant service,

He regretted that he could no longer follow the sea, and, in spite of many alleviations, grumbled at his hard fate.

other excuses than that of old age and infirmity

     THERE was a natural disinclination

in Captain Ball's mind

had not cared more for living on board ship

decline of the merchant-service,

He regretted that he could no longer follow the sea and  grumbled at his hard fate, in spite of many alleviations.

other excuses than that of age and infirmity

2
beautiful china for the parties that she never gave

read them through with heavy sighs,

not his sister's principles but her phrases 

read and reread into tatters, and among her papers

glowing fires of loyalty

beautiful china for the tea parties that she never gave

read them through, though with heavy sighs,

not his sister's principles, but her phrases 

read and re-read into tatters, and among her own papers

glowing fire of loyalty

3
to cough, hoping to hide

than the divil in a gale

was a man at any rate

to cough, and so hide

than the devil in a gale

was a man, at any rate

4
a gentle feminine rap a gentle, feminine rap
5
moment's reflection, he scowled and went and lifted the latch.  moment's reflection he scowled and went to lift the latch. 
6
a middle-aged woman a middle-aged-looking woman
11
that his guest might enter that his guest could enter
14
feet under, beside settling her bonnet a little, as if she feet under, setting her bonnet a little aside, as if she
15
His sister Ann had saved him

the captain was well aware of the existence

Ann had saved him

the captain was aware of the existence

20
you can fry it or make us a chowder, just you can fry it or make a chowder, just
24
my natural feelin's were all worked up. my natural feelin's war all worked up.
30
she kept the upper hand

the time of affliction, that when

had evaded such pleasant social occasions

malady, or by staying boldly among the wharves

she had the upper hand

the time of affliction that when

had evaded such occasions

malady, or staying boldly among the wharves

33
that it was as good a wearin' piece o' goods as he had that was as good wearin' a piece o' goods as he had
35
it to Philadelphy because it to Philadelphy that time I went because
36
some I could name" — Miss Hull at this point some I could name —" Miss Hull at this point
37
Ann Ball was the meanest woman about such expense. She always looked respectable too

given away hundreds o' dollars in that direction

Ann Ball was the meanest woman about expense. She looked respectable too

given away hundreds o' dollars in that way

39
chance." She thought that Miranda had indulged high hopes chance." Miranda had indulged high hopes
41
the minister an' Mis' Calvinn the minister and Mis' Calvinn
43
any time o' day, as Ann Ball any time o' day as Ann Ball
44
was there to tea, Mis' Calvinn

with some new kind of a fancy jelly in it,

when she went home, if she wanted to, speakin'

was there to tea Mis' Calvinn

with some kind of a fancy custard in it,

when she went home, if she wanted it, speakin'

45
Mirandy Hull, that Mis' French is a fox!" Mirandy Hull, that Mis' French is a fox!["]
50
some of ‘em came here an' made visits.

there was a smart young Miss Ball, niece

some of ‘em came here years ago.

there was a smart young girl, niece

52
pleasant-tempered man, that I take time pleasant-tempered man that I take time
53
a most trying husband; it was difficult a most trying husband: it was difficult
55
get a look into some o' the clusets,

you couldn't find no end to it.

mice ain't hivin' into it

get a look in some o' the clusets,

you couldn't find an end to it.

mice ain't banging [bangeing?] into it

56
 I don't like to carry news from one house  I don't like to carry from one house
60
ladies of the parish themselves had not dared to asperse her character to the gruff captain

at the eleven o'clock rendezvous,

what they did not find in eatables they should make up in drinkables

every morning for a social glass

discreet behavior, as well as by

ladies of the parish had not dared to asperse her character themselves to the gruff captain

at the eleven-o'clock rendezvous,

what they didn't find in eatables they would make up in drinkables

every morning for the social glass

discreet behavior as well as by

64
but it could not be undone but it couldn't be undone
65
‘t was excellent good coffee ‘twas good coffee
66
pretended to look into the street

It was early September and flies

pretended to look inthe street

It was early September, and flies

68
speak out, can't ye ma'am speak out, can't ye, ma'am
69
you ought to get your niece -- " you ought to get your niece" --
70
letting off super-abundant steam

when a vessel comes driving at you

letting off superabundant steam

when a ship comes driving at you

71
got through with the preserves, and got through with my jelly, and
74/74A
and wrote the brief note to his great-niece

with a sense of victory. He dreaded the next interview
 

Then the captain regretted his letter

one cool evening beside, when

"She well knows how able she is

and wrote a brief note to his great-niece

with a sense of victory.
     He dreaded the next interview

The captain regretted his letter

one cool evening, when

"She knows well how able she is

75
enter between the outer capes and drop

ruled those ships, and been the ablest

There is no such absolute monarchy

enter between the outer points and drop

ruled those ships themselves, and been the ablest

There's no such absolute monarchy

77
and signed her name. and her name, "Ann."
78
and turned from him with a pettish movement and left him with a pettish movement
79
old ship the Ocean Rover leaving

and the white canvas all spread to the very sky-scrapers

 watched Mrs. French gather an armful of her own

old ship the Ocean Rover leaving

and the canvas was all spread, to the very sky-scrapers

 watched Mrs. French gather her armful of her own

86
I'm sure, I didn't want to be." I'm sure I didn't want to be."
88
‘twould be a good lesson" — ‘twould be a good lesson — "
89
wrote that card from the post-office wrote that post-card from the office
91
you women-folks!" but Captain Ball ventured you women-folks!" and Captain Ball ventured
92
needn't let on, that you haven't

aunt knew all about me.

needn't let on that you haven't

aunt knew well about me.

93
I ain't a hard man at sea

no head for genealogy

I ain't a bad man at sea

no head for geneology

95
before he had been hemmed in on every side before he had felt hemmed in on every side
96
he handed her the post card he handed her the post-card
97
acknowledged Captain Asaph Ball, handsomely acknowledged Captain Asaph, handsomely
97/98
of the old school.

     Early on Monday morning he had

of the old school.
     On Monday morning early he had
 
100
     Captain Ball spoke in a cheerful tone      Captain Asaph spoke in a cheerful tone
103/
103A
One would have thought that

a decaying piece of ship-timber

from the family likeness. From this time Captain Ball 
 

sewing by the front window, in all her foolish furbelows, as he came

You would have thought that

a decaying piece of ship timber

from the family likeness.
     From this time Captain Ball 

sewing, in all her foolish furbelows, by the front window, as he came


Main Contents
Contents: Strangers & Wayfarers
Strangers & Wayfarers Text
Harper's Text