Tales of New England
Main Contents
Return to "A Lost Lover"

Differences between two texts of "A Lost Lover"

Paragraph #    1907 Reprint of Old Friends and New 1879    Text from Tales of New England 1890
1 and that he had been lost at sea and that he been lost at sea
1 her acquaintances had found out or made up her acquaintances found out or made up
2 could be liked and respected, and she could be liked and respected and she
2 some lilac-bushes around it; some lilac-bushes near it;
2 She was a kind, just woman, whose She was a kind, just woman whose
3 elderly cousins living at a distance, and elderly cousins who lived at a distance, and
3 no young people staying in the house no young people staying in her house
3 after she had spent a fortnight after spending a fortnight
3 Her father had laughed at the visit Her father had laughed at this visit
3 When the village-people saw her glance at the girl affectionately, as they sat together in the family-pew of a Sunday, or saw them walking together after tea, they said it was a good thing for Miss Horatia; how bright she looked; and When the village people saw her glance at the girl affectionately, as they sat together in the family pew of a Sunday, or saw them walking together after tea, they said it was a good thing for Miss Horatia; how bright she looked! and
4 she was not mercenary: she was not mercenary;
4 and she liked to please her. and really liked to please her.
4 she was sensible and economical and busy; she was sensible, and economical, and busy;
4 old Andrew, the man, to whom old Andrew, the man servant to whom
4 knew the village-people almost knew the village people almost
4 has that tact and cleverness has the tact and cleverness
5 new friends said, in new friends asked, in
5 she kept her eyes and ears open she kept eyes and ears open
6 At last it happened one day that she had a good chance for a friendly talk with Melissa; for who should know about the family affairs better than she? At last it happened one morning that she had a good chance for a friendly talk with Melissa; for who should know the family affairs better than she?
6 to do some morning errands to do some household errands
6 shady kitchen-doorstep, shady kitchen doorstep,
6 bother yourself," said she: "I've bother yourself," said she. "I've
10 "but, as many years as I "but as many years as I
10 didn't keep company long: it didn't keep company long; it
10 they never were engaged they never was engaged
12 I know he gave her that whale's tooth with the ship drawn on it that's on the mantel-piece in her room. I expect he gave her that whale's tooth with the ship drawn on it that's on the mantelpiece in her room.
13 side of the door: they were straying side of the door; they were straying
13 only Miss's mother she set everything by 'em only Miss's mother, she set everything by 'em
13 good for bee-stings good for bee stings
13 stalks of white lilies and its wandering stalks of white lilies, and its wandering
13 picked a little nosegay of late red roses picked a little bouquet of late red roses
13 to put on the parlor-table. to put on the parlor table.
13 Miss Horatia's brothers, and Miss Horatia's uncles and brothers, and
13 she would tell her her own little love-story she would tell her own little love-story
13 she sat in the front-window-seat ... the sharp noise of the front-gate-latch waked her; and she looked out she sat in the front window-seat ... the sharp noise of the front gate-latch waked her; and she looked out
14 to the kitchen, and to the kitchen and
17 argue it with her: it ain't my place; ... any day; and, though I do say argue it with her, it ain't my place; ... any day; and though I do say
17 he made a prayer, and he kep' sayin' `this aged handmaid,' I should think, a dozen times. Aged handmaid!" said Melissa scornfully: he made a prayer and he kep' sayin' `this aged handmaid,' I should think a dozen times. Aged handmaid!" said Melissa scornfully;
18  Nelly laughed; Melissa looked cross  Nelly laughed. Melissa looked cross
20 "I wonder," said Nelly, after "I wonder," said Nelly after
23 Melissa's grummest tone Melissa's grum tone
24 light in the house; and light in the house, and
24 some pine-chips I had handy for morning on the kitchen-fire some pine chips I had handy for morning on the kitchen fire
24 I remember, when I come here, I remember when I come here,
25 were straight, in a minute spent before the old mirror, and then she hurried down the long elm-shaded street to buy a pound of citron for the cake. She left it on the kitchen-table when were straight in a minute spent before the old mirror, before she hurried down the long elm-shaded street to buy a pound of citron for the cake. She left it on the kitchen table when
26 After tea Nelly and Miss Dane sat in the front-doorway, - the elder woman in a high-backed arm-chair, and the younger on the doorstep. After tea, Nelly and Miss Dane sat in the front doorway, - the elder woman in a high-backed chair, and the younger on the door-step.
26 made no trouble; for his wife ... Miss Horatia had received the business-letter for which made no distress; for his wife ... Miss Horatia had received the business letter for which
28 in her tone: "I find it ... and I don't mind it so much as I suppose you would." in her tone; "I find it ... and I don't mind it as I suppose you would."
33 it is almost time to get a letter from him." it is almost time to get a letter."
35 I suppose we are, too: only  I suppose we are, too; only 
35 but he guessed at it himself but he guessed it himself
36 the hour of Miss Dane's bed-time. the hour of Miss Dane's bedtime.
37 did not go to bed at ten: she did not go to bed at ten; she
38 This is such a natural thing: This is such a natural thing;
38 used to trouble us so much when we look used to trouble us so much, when we look
38 the more she had thought of it, the more the more she thought of it, the more
38 on the ship Chevalier! on the brig Chevalier!
39 granted her many blessings. She would try and serve him better. "I am an old granted her many blessings. "I am an old
40 looking out at the moon?" thought she. "It is very silly; but it is such a beautiful night. looking out at the moon?" she thought. "It is very silly; but this is such a beautiful night
41 Next morning at breakfast Nelly Next morning at breakfast, Nelly
41 sat there in the morning, it was sat there in the morning; it was
42 and she was busy for a while in the parlor and was mysteriously busy for a while in the parlor
42 I think it was the tune of Windham Perhaps it was the tune of Windham
46 after another on the kitchen-table, after another on the kitchen table,
47 "I put up at an old barn three "I lodged in an old barn three
49 Now, if I could go by water, Now if I could go by water,
50 the conversation seemed to flag for a time. the conversation flagged for a time.
54 "I'm a slow traveller," said he: "sailors "I'm a slow traveler;" said he: "sailors
54 There was something in his being for once so comfortable - perhaps it was being with a lady like Miss Dane, who pitied him - that There was something in his feeling, for once, so comfortable, - perhaps it was being with a lady like Miss Dane, who pitied him, - that
54 my mates died of it, and I was sick. my mates died of it, and I was down myself.
60 Why, I didn't come back You see, I didn't come back
60 I was always a hard fellow. I've spent as much as a couple o' fortunes, and here I am.  I was always a gay fellow. I've spent as much as a couple o' fortunes, and here I am a-begging.
61 The round stone that Melissa used The round stone which Melissa used
61 Nelly was a little annoyed: she liked to hear ... that was hard to sew; so Nelly was a little annoyed; she liked to hear ... that was hard to sew, so
64 I said he had been lifted a little The old beggar had been lifted a little
64 quick as I can, hope quick as I can; hope
64 things in which the old sailor found pleasure things in which it was possible to find pleasure
65 But Nelly and Melissa both had heard a strange noise in the kitchen, as if some one had fallen, and had found But Nelly and Melissa both heard a strange noise in the kitchen, as if some one had fallen, and they found
65 They helped her walk into They helped her to walk into
65 as long as she lives what a comfort as long as she lives, what a comfort
66 forgot the old sailor-tramp forgot the old sailor tramp
66 truly called himself a wreck: he was truly called himself a wreck; he was
67 Miss Dane thought many times in the days that came after. Miss Dane thought bitterly, many times in the days that followed.
67 the missing ship Chevalier the missing brig Chevalier
68 She had been a person She had always been a person
68 She would not have liked even to touch him. She had never imagined She had not liked even to stand near him. She had never imagined
68 such a brave, good man, with such a brave, good man with
69 yet the towns-people still whispered it to strangers, and even Melissa and Nelly never knew how she had lost her lover yet the townspeople still whispered it to strangers, and even Melissa and Nelly never knew how she had really lost her lover
69 the whale's tooth had disappeared the whale's tooth disappeared
70 but I so often wish when a story comes to an end that I knew what became of the people afterward. Shall I tell you that but we so often wish, when a story comes to an end, that we knew what became of the people afterward. Shall we believe that
70 Shall I say that Miss Dane ... as she used to be, and somehow misses Shall we say that Miss Dane ... as she used to be, and secretly misses
70 harder thing to understand and a graver thing harder thing to understand, and a graver thing


Tales of New England
Main Contents
Return to "A Lost Lover"