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The Queen's Twin

Aunt Cynthy Dallet

Sarah Orne Jewett

Table of Differences between the texts in The Queen's Twin and in Harper's Bazar.

Consistent Differences

- In The Queen's Twin, New Year and New Year's Day; in Harper's Bazar, New-Year and New-Year's day.

- In The Queen's Twin, most contractions contain spaces. I've removed these in both editions except for those containing "it," which appear differently in the two texts; hence -- 't ain't, 't wa'n't, 't was 't is, etc. in The Queen's Twin; in Harper's Bazar, t'ain't,'twa'n't,'twas and 'tis.

     Also, in all texts, I routinely add a space for contractions containing "as" and "than": mostly "same's" becomes "same 's," "more'n" becomes "more 'n."
 
 

Paragraph The Queen's Twin Harper's Bazar
Title Aunt Cynthy Dallett The New-Year Guests
1 speaking wistfully, - "no, we 

grandmother were old-fashioned folks, 

how 't was then, Miss Pendexter: nobody took much notice of the day except to wish you a Merry Christmas."

speaking wistfully - "no, we

grandmother are old-fashioned folks,

how 'twas then, Miss Pendexter: nobody took much notice of the day except to wish you a merry Christmas."

2 "Sometimes nowadays I hear folks "Sometimes now I hear folks
4 those that lives alone, as they

went upstairs to the north garret 

all dark an' safe, same 's usual.

spoke to her about it, - the

those that lives alone as they

went up stairs to the north garret 

all dark an' safe, same's usual.

spoke to her about it - the

6 "Yes'm; it's a great "Yes, 'm; it's a great
10 old Mr. Nathan Dunn, - left

bill for the funeral expenses

the neat fold o' bills, as

old Mr. Nathan Dunn - left

bill for funeral expenses

the right fold o' bills, as

13 I hope to come out square myself, I hope to come out even myself,
14 your aunt Dallett, New Year's Day your aunt Dallett New-Year's day
16 Hand cheerfully; and so they parted. As Miss Pendexter went down the foot-path to the gate, she send Hand, cheerfully; and so they parted. As Miss Pendexter went down the foot-path to the gate she send
17 may only have wishes may have only wishes
18 what winter can be at its very best

especially Miss Pendexter's, but

that they should be a very great

what winter weather can be at its best

especially in Miss Pendexter's case, but

that they would be a very great

19 pretty footin'!" said Mrs. Hand, with satisfaction. "Seems to me as if my feet went o' themselves; gener'lly I have  pretty footin!" said Mrs. Hand, with satisfaction. "Seems to me as if my feet went o' themselves; gener'ly I have 
22 the elder woman kindly the elder woman, kindly
26 hens don't cost much to keep hens don't cost much to keeps
27 I shall miss 'em" said Abby I shall miss 'em," said Abby
28 Your aunty Cynthy ought Your aunt Cynthy ought
33 Oh, no, I never  Oh no, I never 
38 only for a cup o' tea, perhaps

damp to me, - the s'rubs

It all fell to pieces. I never

hospitality that ever I see!" -

only for a cup o' tea perhaps

damp to me - the s'rubs

It all fell to pieces, an' I never

hospitality that ever I see - "

46 The table was loaded down; there was cup-custard and custard pie,

an' elegant cake, - one kind

We set down together an' 

The table was loaded down: there was cup-custards an' custard pie,

elegant cake - one kind 

We set down together, an' 

47 laughing like a girl; the speaker's

tell that to Aunt Cynthy, if conversation

laughing like a girl, the speaker's

tell that to Aunt Cynthy if conversation

50 she said, aloud, -  she said, aloud - 
51 like schoolboys fighting

October than the first of January, 

into the green dooryard, and

her denomination, and a pair

like school-boys fighting

October than the 1st of January,

into the green door-yard, and

her denomination and a pair

52 Happy New Year, - she  Happy New-Year - she 
60 somebody is comin'; he don't  somebody is comin', he don't 
61 out of the woods, - the two women out of the woods - the two women
64 of a body under a shoulder-shawl and thick petticoats. She got back to her chair again, and the guests took off their bonnets in the bedroom, and returned discreet and sedate in their black woolen dresses.

a year ago, that day

"And I ain't seen you now

of a body in its shoulder-shawl and thick petticoats. She got back to her chair again, and the guests took their bonnets off in the bedroom, and returned discreet and sedate in their black woollen dresses.

a year ago that day

"And I [']ain't seen you now

65 said Aunt Cynthy kindly. said Aunt Cynthy, kindly.
67 Gener'lly he's about here

a good, stiddy boy

Gener'ly he's about here

a grand, stiddy boy

69 made out, poor 's he was

corner o' the mantelpiece

the 'Life o' General Lafayette,' in a green cover, - I've got it now, but we child'n 'bout read it to pieces, - 

made out, poor 's [poors] he was

corner o' the mantel-piece

the Life o' General Lafayette, in a green cover - I've got it now, but we child'n 'bout read it to pieces - 

70 hard a time now, - all 

an' mothers done the rulin'."

hard a time now - all 

an' mothers done the rulin'[.]"

72 Aunt Cynthia compassionately.

dried up, Abby does. She

Aunt Cynthia, compassionately.

dried up, Abby does[.] She

77 you would, if you were

winter with me, - just

anxious these long winter nights

you would if you were

winter with me - just

anxious these winter nights

80 till spring, - not if I had Foss's 

she said beseechingly.

till spring - not if I had Foss's

she said, beseechingly.

81 I've been lonesome sometimes" -  I've been lonesome sometimes - "
83 said Aunt Cynthia gayly. 

proper for the Queen.

said Aunt Cynthia, gayly. 

proper for the queen.

87 This is Saturday, you may This is Saturday; you may
88 she announced calmly she announced, calmly

 
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The Queen's Twin