Sarah Orne Jewett Works
The Queen's Twin
 

 

Martha's Lady

Sarah Orne Jewett

Table of Differences between the texts in The Queen's Twin and in The Atlantic.


Paragraph The Queen's Twin Atlantic
1 green garden was bright 

Under the elms in the large shady front yard you might

quote that great author, Dr. Johnson, and

green garden beyond was bright

In the large shady front yard under the elms you might 

quote his favorite Dr. Johnson and

2 the tall gate-posts with their white urns

fill the prim best rooms and find them full of cheer.

the tall gate-posts, with their white urns

fill the prim best rooms and find them pleasant.

3 something past thirty,

accept the fact of age, and

At thirty-five she had 

a little past thirty,

accept the fact of age at once, and

At thirty she had 

4 her own doorway, she

reaction toward formalism, especially
 

a new freedom had hardly yet begun.

     The dull interior, the changed life of

her own doorway she

reaction toward formalism, and even stagnation of thought and behavior, especially

a new freedom had hardly yet begun, except as a growl of thunder or a flash of lightning draws one's eyes to the gathering clouds through the lifeless air of a summer day.

     The dull interior, the changed life of

5 life of the old house, whose former

conditions, and a little leaven

life of the old house whose former

conditions, and the little leaven

6 where many pleasant people came

tenor voice, though sadly out of practice; but when

such delicious fashion that

where many pleasant persons came

tenor voice though sadly out of practice, but when

such delicious fashion, that

8 last branch that will bear me. last branch that will bear anyone.
10 wide open upon the large sunshiny

It was now late in the afternoon

in full sunshine, and Miss Harriet

wide open into the large sunshiny

Now it was late in the afternoon

in full sunshine still, and Miss Harriet

11 in the dining-room, already, slow in the dining-room already, slow
11-12 her ignorance and patient efforts.

     The two young creatures, mistress and maid

her ignorance and patient efforts.

     The two young creatures, mistress and maid

14 "Yes 'm," said Martha sadly. "Yes, 'm," said Martha sadly.
20 wooden house, was like a 

in an art museum, such

Pyne's fashion of life; and Martha's

wooden house was like a 

in an art museum; such

Pyne's fashion of life, and Martha's

21 the two ladies, who were sitting the two ladies who were sitting
22 and returned his thanks. and sent his thanks.
24 "Only a few cherries," "Only a few of your cherries,"
28 "It must be his 'Sermons on the Seriousness of Life;' they

"They are considered very fine discourses.

"It must be his Sermons on the Seriousness of Life; they

"They are considered very fine; remarkably able discourses.

32 where they had gone, like other households where they had gone like other households
36 so charming, that I told her so charming, and I told her
37 "Oh, yes, Miss Helena!" 

we're dreadful hard pushed.

"Oh yes, Miss Helena!" 

we're dreadful hard pushed at home.

42 with a brass ring on top with a brass hinge on top
44 for cherries with his six-foot-two." for cherries with his six foot two."
46 unnecessary guest just then, in the busiest

cut a piece of a great cake 

a brilliant, much-varied foreign life

unnecessary guest just then in the busiest

cut a piece of the great cake 

a brilliant much-varied foreign life

48 this tall, gaunt woman this tall gaunt woman
49 said Martha, half aloud, as she sat said Martha half aloud as she sat
50 wedding of Helena Dysart's only daughter; wedding of Mrs. Dysart's only daughter;
51 round white old English dish

with a bit of glass like a ruby

round white Limoges dish

with a piece of glass like a ruby

54 "Who do you think is coming this very night at half-past six?

Miss Helena Vernon, -- the Honorable Mrs. Dysart, she is now."

"Who do you think is coming this very night at half past six?

Miss Helena Vernon, the Honorable Mrs. Dysart, she is now."

59 "It is all ready," said Martha. "I can carry some of those little sweet-brier roses upstairs before she comes." "It is all ready, I think," said Martha. "I can bring some of those little sweet-brier roses upstairs before she comes."
62 Hannah, the cook, who Hannah the cook, who
63 the long-expected guest the long expected guest
65 behind the white lilac-bushes as the carriage behind the white lilacs as the carriage
66 Then Mrs. Dysart looked up and smiled  Then Helena looked up and smiled 
66-7 and Miss Helena had come.

     That night Martha waited

and Miss Helena had come.

     That night Martha waited

67-8 but Helena called her back. She suddenly knew the whole story and could hardly speak.

     "Oh, my dear Martha!" she cried, "won't you kiss me good-night? Oh, Martha, have you remembered like this, all these long years!"

but Helena called her back.

     "You have always remembered, haven't you, Martha dear?" she said. "Won't you kiss me good-night?


Sarah Orne Jewett Works
The Queen's Twin Contents