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Table of Differences for Chapters 1-5

THE TORY LOVER
Sarah Orne Jewett

The Atlantic Monthly Serialization
November 1900 -- 86:590-606

- The Atlantic Monthly text has no chapter titles or epigraphs.  These were added to the First Edition text.
- The first word of each section in the Atlantic Monthly text appears in "small caps" font.
- "Gundelow" in the Atlantic text becomes "gundalow" in the first edition text.


Chapter 1


Paragraph   First Edition Text   Atlantic Monthly Text
     
1
worn red morocco leather. The sun had just gone
 

dip of long oars,

worn red morocco leather.
      The sun had just gone

dip of the long oars,

2
with plenty of well-plaited ruffles

the most impressive figure among them was

of fixed Arminian opinions.

with plenty of well-plaited white ruffles

the most impressive figure of all was

of fixed Arminian opinions.  Here was a figure that could dignify the best occasions.

3
counted him a second Sir William Pepperrell counted him a second William Pepperrell
4
a long hill behind the house

its deep channel over noisy falls

a long slope behind the house

its deep channel and over noisy falls

5
down toward the water,

long stretch of water was greater

as if restless with unspoken jokes.

down toward the river,

long stretch of the water was greater

as if with unspoken jokes.

6
to the landing-place with to the landing place with
8
by boat-cramp, as he now

seemed not to observe things

by boat-cramp as he now

seemed not to notice things

9
the door of the dining parlor. the door of the dining room.

 

Chapter 2


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 1
sat in Parliament at Westminster

self-furtherance in public matters,

sat in the House of Parliament at Westminster

self-furtherance in high matters,

6
 best of news; there

wealth of the town were

best of news, and there

wealth of Berwick were

8
guest of honor was not unmindful of excellent claret guest of honor was keen for his claret
9
your Northern home.  They little know in Great Britain what stately living is among us.  The noble Countess of Selkirk thought your Northern house.  They little know in Great Britain what stately living is among us.  My friend, the Countess of Selkirk, thought
10
the colonies, it would the colonies it would
11
be amused, at first, be amused at first,
12
and the Court for his Spanish gentlemen," said

now; there is the cause of all our troubles.  Norman and Saxon have never yet learned to agree."

and the Court," said

now; 't is the cause of all our troubles.  Norman and Saxon never yet have learned to agree."

14
"For me," explained the major

been a parson myself

Huyghens, author of the Cosmotheoros

my father's kinsman, and

Tilly of stern faith

"For me," continued the major

been a minister myself

Huyghens, the author of the Cosmotheoros

my father's cousin, and

Tilly of the stern faith

23
     "I must beg your reverence's kind pardon if I contradict you," said Paul Jones, with scornful bitterness.      "I must beg your reverence's kind pardon," said Paul Jones, with scornful bitterness.  "When I was first aboard the Two Friends, slaver, I took the work like any other, and did my poor duty to my owners like any thoughtless sailor.  We bought our freight when we must, and stole it when we could, – most of them were poor, gay-hearted children pleased with their beads and trinkets, and when we easily coaxed them on board they sang their foolish songs and played their tricks for us, and laughed until the very last; ‘t was a place where slavers had never come before.  We weighed anchor, but they had no thought we should not bring them back.  There was a mother with a good human face, who tended a hunchbacked boy that could not step alone; she had brought him, a heavy weight in her arms, to get some gifts with the rest.  The captain had them take him from her to carry to the last boat that went ashore to fetch some sailors off; she stood on the deck, laughing, for to wait her own turn, but the light went out of her eyes; she stood like a stone, and saw them throw the poor creature upon the beach . . .  they took her down quick between decks, and she shrieked all night above the rest, and in the morning she had bit the cords in two that bound her, and flew to the deck, leaped over the side and sank; we were almost out of sight of land.  ‘God helping me, a sinner,' says I, ‘I shall never set my foot on board a hellish slaver again.' I had supped too full of horrors.  I left the Two Friends when we came to Barbadoes, and forfeited all my share of gain."
24
the table; the captain's reply was

Miss Hamilton standing near the open

smiled at him as she colored deeply

the table, but the captain's anecdote was

Mary Hamilton standing in the open

smiled at him through the shining tears that filled her eyes; then colored deeply

26
a good country house of Queen Anne's time a good house of George the First's time
27
some of our Berwick elms

lends to our high ridges

from court, I missed a well-started row of young elms

down river by the packet

some of our strong young elms

lends to the high ridges

from court I missed a well-started row of elms
 

down river by Varney's packet

30
I am afraid that we can

the Earl of Halifax tavern

A friend of mine

old Rumford had been unfairly driven

says Wallingford in a loud voice

I am afraid we can

the Wentworth mansion

And a friend of mine

old Rumford had been fairly driven

says he in a loud voice

35
Boston have often made Boston have sometimes made
36
homespun shirt-sleeves homespun shirt sleeves
37
General George Washington General Washington
39
"Some of our leaders in "Some of our partners in
43
the part of their Rockingham towns

his wife saw Adams's great anxiety

When the good lady told

it is men like Sam Adams 

the part of New Hampshire

Madam Gilman saw his great anxiety

When Madam Gilman told

't is men like Sam Adams 

46
had sense enough to lift the tax and give us liberty for our own trade, had sense enough to lift the tax,
51
 stately dining-room of his host  stately dining room of his host
54
our ancient Berwick traditions our Berwick traditions
55
house in old Barvick and a mug

This summer has found

take their old swords again

house in old Berwick and a mug

This season has found

take the old swords again

57
startled; as if the war might really end without having served his own ambitions. startled; the war might really end without having served his own purpose.

 

Chapter 3


Paragraph   First Edition Text   Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
1
to-night.  Sullivan is a soldier born. to-night.  Yes, Sullivan is a great man and soldier.
3
he talked not only of our unfortunate King James, but he spoke not only of our unfortunate King James the Third, but
6
the best Frenchmen of his time

his coming here, there are

and some that 't was for

the best men of his time

his coming here there are

and some say that 't was for

8
great lack of classical teaching in all this region for great lack in all this region of classical teaching for
11
a pretty boy busy with a pretty man busy with

 

Chapter 4


Paragraph   First Edition Text   Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
1
opened the door the large room opened the door, the large room
2
hear the men's voices hear the gentlemen's voices
3
beauty as Miss Hamilton beauty as Mary Hamilton
5
said she fronted him

but in breaking his own colt on a Sunday.  Yet nothing

said she had fronted him

but breaking his own colt on a Sunday. But nothing

6
so full of kind thought so full of thought
8
said Mary, in a voice said Mary in a voice
11
 to the doubting Patriots, then  to the doubting patriots, then
12
 Oh, Betsey, what in the world  Oh, Betty, what in the world
13
spoken long ago, if only spoken long ago if only
14
ready now, dear Betty, and make

with our beaux all gone to the army

ready now, and make

with all our beaux gone to the camp at Cambridge

16
 come to-night, there may  come to-night there may
17
 across the water.
     "We must make us fine
across the water.  "We must make us fine

 

Chapter 5


Paragraph   First Edition Text   Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
2
young peach-trees young peach trees
4
I must speak with you I must talk with you
5
the window-sill the window sill
6
I hoped that you were still in Portsmouth.  Go, – it is your I hoped you were still in Portsmouth.  Go, – 't is your
7
come out to me for a moment come out for a moment
8
and tossed aside the curtain, turning again and, tossing aside the curtain, turned again
9
outside in the moonlight out there in the moonlight
10
The dancing went on; The dancing went on,
13
see the moon;"

the elm-trees'

her dancing-shoes

see the moon,"

the elm trees'

her dancing shoes

14
and life-long habit and life long habit
19
bringing sorrow and danger to

In another hour your mother's

scruples any more; and

bringing danger and sorrow to

In another night your mother's

scruples any more, and

22
Mr. Langdon and his officers

gave it me, though your noble captain 

my peace with the commander, if it is your pleasure

Mr. Langdon and the officers

gave it me, but your noble captain 

my own peace with the commander, if 't is your pleasure

25
my guests;" but my guests," but

 
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