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Table of Differences for Chapters 26 - 30

THE TORY LOVER
Sarah Orne Jewett

The Atlantic Monthly Serialization

- The Atlantic Monthly text has no chapter titles or epigraphs.  These were added to the First Edition text.
- The first word of each section in the Atlantic Monthly text appears in "small caps" font.
- "Gundelow" in the Atlantic text becomes "gundalow" in the first edition text.
- Both texts are inconsistent in hyphenating guardhouse / guard-house.
Chapter 26


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 1
Wallingford insisted that he must carry out the captain's plain instructions Wallingford coldly insisted that he should carry out the captain's instructions
5
he plainly heard Dickson's voice once more, he heard Dickson's voice once more plainly,
 8
waked the town; he must have found the guardhouse at once, for the watch waked the town, and had found the guardhouse at once; for the watch
 9
running and crying confusion, and boats running and crying, and boats

 

Chapter 27


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 8
wind on the fells blew wind on the raise blew
9
her satin gown and her laces and her black satin gown and her best lace and
 12
old corporal, who had old corporal who had
 13
nowt for 't now but a litter, an' nowt for 't but a litter now, an'
14
"Get him a-horse again!" "Get him ahorse again!"

 

Chapter 28


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 1
spinning room in the second story

her handmaidens one warm spring

spinning room in its second story

her handmaidens, one warm spring

 2
seat of the young maids 

great house; also the shipyard

seat of those maids 

great house, also the shipyard

 3
could look across the river

comfort in watching for each

could see across the river

comfort in looking for each

 4
"O Death, rock me asleep"

sang Peggy dolefully;   

"O Death, rock me asleep,"

sang Peggy dolefully.

 5
At last the poignancy of feeling At last her poignancy of feeling
 6
announced Peggy with

she sings right on inside me

announced Peggy, with

she sings right on inside of me

 7
She stopped to tie

young caroling voice,

"Two pence ha'penny is his rent,
   And he cannot come every day to woo!"

She now stopped to tie

young caroling voice,

"Two pence ha'penny is my rent,
   And I cannot come every day to woo!"

 8
she had felt some dim foreboding that

full of spring-time calls

she had felt, too, some dim foreboding, that

full of springtime calls

 10
torn in strips for them that's wounded torn in strips for those that's wounded
 16
as the eager girls dropped

and workmen from the wharves

as all the girls dropped

and some workmen from the wharves

 17 / 18
in New Jersey.
      The messengers stood 
in New Jersey.

     The messengers stood 

 19
John Ricker's dead, and John Marr and Billy Lord's

and young Mr. Wallingford's deserted

John Ricker's dead, and Billy Lord's

and young Wallingford's deserted

 20
at every stopping-place for miles at every stopping place for miles
 26
young mistress turned away young mistress of the house turned away

 

Chapter 29


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 3
lasts very late to-night; you have lasts very late to-night, yet you have
 4
It will soon be dark  'T will soon be dark 
 5
mind, before I heared folks

Cæsar felt bad when he was

but he's got his proper feelin's

mind, an' then I heared folks

Cæsar felt so bad when he was

but he's got proper feelin's

 6
she had been long alone she had been very long alone
 8
see things their proper size at first.

I'd put on my big caldron

I nodded my head and let

see things their proper size.

I'll put on my big caldron

I nodded and let

 10
Will you bespeak the boat? Will you bespeak a boat?
 11
there's our own watermen ready

a can o' mulled port, an'

there's all our own men ready

a glass o' port juice, an'

 13
listen to me; she must listen to me: she must
 14
The pairs of rowers were

mounted their liveries, such

desire for display, but a plainer

The four rowers were

mounted their livery, such

desire for display.  A plainer

 15
handed Miss Hamilton to her seat with handed Miss Hamilton into her boat with
 17

17A

17B

They had thought it lucky that

swore under their breath for

large house on the hill. As Mary passed
 

the girl felt no fear now

something to be done. There was no light 

They had thought it well that

swore under their breaths for

large house on the hill.
      As Mary passed

the girl felt no fear now that there

something to be done.
     There was no light 

 18 / 19
unbarred the door.

    "They tell me there

unbarred the door.
     "They tell me there
19
that danger already hemmed them in that danger hemmed them in
 20
I need my son    oh, I have had I need my son    I have had
 22
was now rallying all her forces. was rallying all her force.
26
if they are strangers, we if they be strangers, we
27
sight of her they gave sight of her figure they gave
40
you should know that he has not broken you know that he has not broken
41
done with their Royalties," and

sound of heavy trampling, all

done with their royalties," and

sound of heavy treading, all

42
I am Mary Hamilton of the Patriots, and I am Mary Hamilton, and
44
midst, with friends behind him

Shackley in his scarlet cloak; Parson

were all there together.  They

midst, with others behind him

Shackley in his scarlet cloak, Parson

were all there too.  They

45
will not see a Christian woman and kind will not see a Christian gentlewoman and kind
49
["]You may tell "You may tell
50
You may fetch me a little water

you can help me get to the dining 

You may bring me a little water

you must help me get to the dining 

51
window still glittered on the floor window still glistened on the floor
52
friends in peril," she said, "but

my sad situation.["]

friends in peril," she added, "but

my sad situation."

53
has in consideration an act of great severity against

If he be still living now

has an act of great severity in consideration against

If he still be living now

54
pondering the matter with her eyes pondering, with her eyes
58
"I do acknowledge the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA to be free, independent; and sovereign states, and declare that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience to GEORGE THE THIRD, KING OF GREAT BRITAIN; and I renounce, refuse, and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him; and I do swear that I will, to the utmost of my power, support, maintain, and defend the said UNITED STATES against the said KING GEORGE THE THIRD, his heirs and successors, and his or their abettors, assistants, and adherents, "I do acknowledge the United States of America to be free, independent and sovereign states, and declare that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience to George the Third, King of Great Britain; and I renounce, refuse and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him; and I do swear that I will, to the utmost of my power, support, maintain and defend the said United States against the Said King George the Third, his heirs and successors, and his or their abettors, assistants and adherents,
59
Chadbourne half rose in his eagerness

great land-holder, and

and it were better if

Chadbourne half rose, in his eagerness

great landholder, and

and 't were better if

60
Is this the oath that Roger Is that the oath that Roger
62
and all our fortunes in your hands and all his fortunes in your hands
63
last night.  You must thank the other good men who last night, dear friends.  You must thank the other gentlemen who
 68
and Mr. Hill have both told

a month's waiting and uncertainty here;

and Mr. Hill both told

a month's waiting and uncertainty

70
It was thought a useless venture

went last to Virginia I thought

It is thought a useless venture

went to England last I thought

72
and a good sailor too. and a good sailor.
74
she whispered.  "I shall she whispered,  "I shall
78
Your young heart speaks now, and

own; it would make you

'Tis your young heart that speaks, and

own; 't would make you

81
will build a hundred houses

Yet, you must always

will build a dozen houses

Yes, you must always

82
she even smiled as she spoke she even laughed as she spoke
84
as if the last night's peril

The fruit-trees were coming into bloom: a young cherry-tree

the pear-trees were ready

as if last night's peril

The fruit trees were coming into bloom: a young cherry tree

the pear trees were ready

89
waits her clearance papers waits her clearing papers
91
shall send many other things by boat shall send down many other things by boat

 

Chapter 30
In paragraph 4 of the Atlantic text, "Charles Radcliffe" appears.  Elsewhere in the Atlantic, the name is "Ratcliffe"


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 2
she exclaimed, at the end she exclaimed at the end
 3
was pleased with his success 

frankly expressed amusement.

was pleased by his success 

frankly expressed amusement:

 4
aapprentice boy to a French upholsterer; this

ghost of Hamlet at Covent Garden.  Well, it was

and parading in his pasteboard armor

aapprintice boy to a French upholsterer: this

ghost in Hamlet at Covent Garden.  Well, 't was

and paradin' in his pasteboard armor

 6
like a last year's bird's nest

officer out of his uniform or a doctor wanting

self that ever belonged to my

like a bird's nest

officer out of his uniform, or a doctor wanting

self that was ever belonging to my

 12
"You look at a poor man as if he were the front of a cathedral," he chided her, again trying to be merry.  "There, don't look at a poor man as if he were the front of a cathedral," he begged her, trying again to be merry. 
 17
old people started back, they believed old people started back, as if they believed
 18
I am so full of hope that I have come I was so full of hope that I must come
 20
the quick firelight, sprung afresh, made her look like a bright flame the bright firelight, sprung afresh, made her look like a red flame
 22
wrap you well and hold wrap you and hold
 23
from its unconscious clinging from her unconscious clinging
 25
I have heard of the fray last night, but you will find letters here that will be of service. I heard of the fray last night.  You will find letters here that will serve you.
 26
The girl's face was full

being safely done.

Mary's face was full

being safely done. So she sprang to her feet.

 29
he added with a smile.  "You do not know your Rabelais he added, with a smile.  "You have not learned your Rabelais
 32
that you had been prevented that you were prevented
33
I must not lose this fair wind to get I do not like to lose this breeze to get
35
I stay with you and Phebe with me, and Susan I stay with you, and Susan

 
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