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Table of Differences for Chapters 31 - 34

THE TORY LOVER
Sarah Orne Jewett

The Atlantic Monthly Serialization

- The Atlantic Monthly text has no chapter titles or epigraphs.  These were added to the First Edition text.
- The first word of each section in the Atlantic Monthly text appears in "small caps" font.
- "Gundelow" in the Atlantic text becomes "gundalow" in the first edition text.
- "Smallpox" in the Atlantic text becomes "small-pox" in the first edition text.


Chapter 31


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 1 / 1A
 half-clad man to shivering.  The dreary place  half-clad man to shivering. 
     The dreary place
 6
how I should have it next how I should take it next
 7
man off The Yankee Hero man off the Yankee Hero
 9
trying his sea legs, like an eel trying his sea legs like an eel
 10
don't know who it is. don't know who 't is.
 18
heavily built, kind-faced old mariner heavily-built, kind-faced old mariner
 19
some on ye caw-handed cutters, an' keep some on ye, an' keep
 21
any way they could," said young Earl angrily. any way they could."
 23
returned Warren with indignation. returned Warren indignantly.
24
the old Lower Landin' an' the old Landin' an'
 25
were all thought guilty of treason were all guilty of treason
 26
while some one else rubbed while some else rubbed [probable error]
 31
 said with wide-eyed bewilderment  said, with wide-eyed bewilderment
 33
"Well, I bain't"repeated Warren, 

and it's a good deal worse 'n layin' at home

right in sight o' the river 'n all 's a-goin' on.

We get no sort of news

"Well, I bain't,"repeated Warren,

and 't is a good deal worse 'n layin' at home

right in sight o' the river 'n' all 's a-goin' on.

We get no sort o' news

35
count upon good friends," but some count upon good friends." But some
37
it is by no fault of mine 't is by no fault of mine
39
I knew there was business afoot! I knew there was such business afoot!

 

Chapter 32


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 2
ever a final certainty in her breast

force of love.  Love itself had

ever a certainty in her breast

force of love.  Fate itself had

 3
a warmer head-covering, or  a warmer head covering, or 
 8
it was a fit town 't was a fit town
 10
the Halifax friends.  But I saw one stranger shake the Halifax folks.  But I saw one man shake
 14/1
said the older woman.

of a courting man, he was older

heart, which lives by longing,

said the elder woman.

of a courting man. He was older

heart, that lives by longing,

 15
"Oh, yes.  I always "Oh yes.  I always
 16
"She had great beauty "Then she had great beauty
 17
our river neighborhoods their name.  Peggy says there were other white people in Barvick long ago; the old Indians had some strange legends of a folk who had gone away. our river neighborhoods their name.  Heaven knows who cleared and planted them; 't was no Indian work. Peggy says there were other white people in Barvick long ago; the old Indians had some strange legends of a fair-haired folk who had gone away.
 18
to forget such things.  I can see her sitting in the sun with a fescue in her hand, teaching the little children.  They needed bravery in those old days; nothing can to forget such things.  They needed bravery in those old days; in our time nothing can
 21
"Do not say ‘rebels'!" "Do not say rebels!"
 23
 upon these!  and we have Mr. Franklin

let us agree, if we can

 upon these; and we have Mr. Franklin

let us agree if we can

 24
hopes and quick intuitions hopes and its intuitions
 26
captain was a staunch Royalist captain was a stanch [probable error] Royalist
 28
'T is a delicate, frail, spirited face.

seems but the other day

a Goodwin look, small featured

'T is but a delicate, womanish face.

seems but t' other day

a Goodwin look, small-featured

31
she meant,' Peggy declared next

off to the kitchen with

she meant,' says Peggy next

off to her kitchen with

42
as if it were but a holiday as if 't were but a holiday




Chapter 33

Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 1
the long landing-stairs.

after their four long weeks at sea

the long landing stairs.

after their six long weeks at sea

 2
There it is, the large house  There 't is, the large house 
 3
shy and much occupied captain shy and much-occupied captain
 5
"I am Mary Hamilton, of Berwick," "I am Mary Hamilton, of Barvick,"
 6
in her half familiar face

off the sea by your fresh looks.

I was thinking of cousin Wallingford

in her half-familiar face

off the sea, by your fresh looks.

I was thinking of Mistress Wallingford

 8
 pride of my dear old Barvick  pride of my old Barvick
 11
and your old friend Madam Wallingford and our old friend Madam Wallingford
 14
you must bid your maids you may bid your maids
 18
a small, old vessel, but she wears a small vessel, but she wears

 

Chapter 34

Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 2
cause to be grateful for

old friends.  It was the threshold

cause to be so grateful for

old friends. 'T was the threshold

 3
and many others.  The Sewalls and Russells, the Faneuils, and the Boutineaus, who were still in Bristol, had already sent 

living in the Davises' house;

came in; it was a heavy charge

the heavy box with brass scutcheons

a proper English waiting-maid chosen

did not wish to bring a weight

and of many others.  The Sewalls, the Faneuils, and the Boutineaus who were still in Bristol had already sent 

living in the Davis's house;

came in; 't was a heavy charge

the small, heavy box with brass scutcheons

a proper waiting maid chosen

did not wish to be a weight

9
own province, and was silent,  [error in this edition] own province, and was silent.
 12
all along the sea-coast by all up and down the coast by
 13
would soon know," Mary answered him. would soon know," replied Mary.
 15
You are so kind and I am so You are so kind, and I am so
 19
stood straight, and dropped whatever

sat at home and grieved.

stood straight and dropped whatever

sat at home at first and grieved.

 21
only have security for its continuance.  We did not wish to separate from England, and if the separation has come, it is only from our sad necessity.  Cannot you see only have security enough for its continuance.  We did not wish to separate from England.  If it has come, it is only from our sad necessity.  But cannot you see
 24
son of that Radcliffe who was a Scotch rebel in '45, son of that Ratcliffe who was a Scotch rebel in the year '45,
 30/31
 and drew back a little.
     "I hear the King
and drew back a little. "I hear the King
 32
loyal to the King, however

If her foolish son had been

in a gentler tone:  – 

loyal to our government, however

If her son had been

in a gentler tone:


 
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