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Table of Differences for Chapters 40 - 45

THE TORY LOVER
Sarah Orne Jewett

The Atlantic Monthly Serialization

- The Atlantic Monthly text has no chapter titles or epigraphs.  These were added to the First Edition text.
- The first word of each section in the Atlantic Monthly text appears in "small caps" font.
- "Gundelow" in the Atlantic text becomes "gundalow" in the first edition text.
- "Smallpox" in the Atlantic text becomes "small-pox" in the first edition text.
- "Ratcliffe" in the Atlantic text becomes "Radcliffe" in the first edition text.
Chapter 40


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 6
The mermaids they at the bottom of the sea, 

began the song again

The mermaids they at the bottom of the sea

began the song once again

 7
the broad window-sill where  the broad window sill where 
 10
back to the water-side down back to the water side down

 
 

Chapter 41


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 2
pillow of his arm and fell sound asleep pillow of his arm, and fell sound asleep
 5
the air of a kingbird which  the air of a king-bird which 
 7
and I shall leave you here to-night and I must leave you here to-night
 9
over the downs into Bristol over the downs by Redlands into Bristol
 16
that it was not yet day,    and that it was not yet day?    and
 21
morning, it was almost morning, 't was almost
 26
Plymouth; it would be Plymouth; 't would be
 30
the inn is no doubt near!" the inn is no doubt near."
 31
slip of paper, Dickson would be rich enough at that day's end. slip of paper Dickson would be richer at that day's end by one hundred pounds.

 

Chapter 42


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 1
ancient ferrying-place where travelers

the road-bed was worn

ancient ferrying place where travelers

the road bed was worn

3
It was a poor tired country nag

as if she harbored no ill will in spite of hardships.

'T was a poor tired country nag

as if in spite of hardships she harbored no ill will.

4
a squeal from crowded horses a squeal of crowded horses
8
We must trouble you for supper

some brandy at once for my comrade

We must need trouble you for supper

some brandy for my comrade

12
waiting for Mr. Davis, there was waiting for Mr. Davis there was

 

Chapter 43


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 1
visit to his counting-room

a disreputable looking fellow

visit to his counting room

a disreputable-looking fellow

 3
to Roger W , of Piscataqua  to Roger W d, of Piscataqua 
 9
Perhaps we shall hear from Roger. Perhaps we shall hear that Roger's alive.
 11
we may have news of him we may have word from him
 13
in danger of the gout in danger of my gout
 18
St. Mary Radcliffe stood like gray rocks

close to the water-side

St. Mary Redcliffe stood like gray rocks

close to the water side

 19
with a little gable window

offered a resting-place to

with one little gable window

offered a resting place to

 20
on the window-sills, and on the window sills, and
 21
noisy Welsh pack men and drovers noisy Welsh pack-men and drovers
26
tray with the desired refreshments. tray with his desired refreshments.

 

Chapter 44


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 9
You have this document o' one You have this paper o' one
14 / 15
our honest right."
      There was a heavy tramping 
our honest right."

     There was a heavy tramping 

19
answered the trapped adventurer answered the gentleman adventurer
21
yelled Dickson, like a man suddenly crazed

bid him pay and begone

yelled Dickson, who was like a man suddenly crazed

bid him pay for what he had and begone

23
at Dickson; it was a pretty encounter at Dickson; 't was a pretty encounter
27
said Captain Paul Jones quietly, standing said Captain Paul Jones, standing
29
pity on my sick wife and little family pity on my sick wife and my little family
32
poured some of the yellow gold poured out some of the yellow gold
33
Forgive me if you can Forgive me, if you can
34
loudly, turning to his sailors

Take him down to the boat and put off.

loudly, calling to his sailors

Take him down to the boat, and put off.

35
his poor revenge; he sent the crumpled

sailors kicked him before

his poor revenge: he sent the crumpled

sailors pushed him before

41
he was a free unchallenged man he was a free, unchallenged man

 

Chapter 45


Paragraph  First Edition Text  Atlantic Monthly Text
 
 
 
 1
signals of any kind, or signals of any sort, or
2
these tales, of the lieutenant's forced leave of absence, some said his discharge, by reason of his wounds and these tales of the lieutenant's forced leave of absence; some said his discharge, by reason of his wound and
4
On the terrace by the southern door

black, Major Haggens, with his red cloak

and Master Sullivan, with his stately white head

On the flagstones by the southern door

black, Major Haggens with his red cloak

and Master Sullivan with his stately white head

5
friends: Miss Betsy Wyat friends: little Miss Betsy Wyat
7
garden to the water-side garden to the water side
8
home together; we did not know

he said with sorrow

home together.  Thank Heaven; we did not know

he said, with sorrow

11
your good Rodney!["]  Oh,

[ Erroneous quotation mark in this edition ]

your good Rodney!  Oh,

 
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